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Beast Under The Wizards Bridge Paperback – Mar 21 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Puffin USA (March 21 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142300659
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142300657
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 12.7 x 1.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 113 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,561,893 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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For many months Lewis Barnavelt had been worried. Read the first page
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Oct. 2 2002
Format: Hardcover
Upon the death of John Bellairs, Brad Strickland stepped into some very hard-to-fit shoes. The story of "Beast Under The Wizard's Bridge" is both exceptionally clever and somewhat awkward in places, as Strickland still was adjusting to the necessity of writing like another author.
The old iron bridge over Wilder Creek is being torn down by the county, to make way for a newer, more modern structure. Lewis Barnavelt's uncle Jonathan is nervous about this -- not only is the bridge a familiar landmark, but it was constructed by a wizard to keep a long-dead relative from returning. The dead relative was Jedediah Clabbernong, a man obsessed with his own aging, and determined to become one of the immortal alien Great Old Ones.
Now something is creeping from Wilder Creek. Under the sway of the equally determined Mr. and Mrs. Moote, a hideous squidlike humanoid is rising to the surface again -- and it can suck the life from any creature and reduce it to a disintegrating husk. Now as a comet returns -- the comet that claimed Clabbernong a century before -- Lewis, Rose Rita, Jonathan and Mrs. Zimmerman must stop the Mootes before more hideous creatures are unleashed...
Brad Strickland sure knows how to send chills down a spine. In excellent imitation of Bellairs' style, he creates some outstandingly horrifying situations. Jonathan Barnavelt's description of the disintegrating woodchuck he encountered (and pounded to death) is only outdone by the encounter that Lewis and Rose Rita have with an incredibly old, hideous horse. What's wrong? While Bellairs was never the most subtle of writers, the twelve-foot-tall tentacled squid-headed Lovecraftian nightmare seems more than a little excessive.
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By A Customer on March 7 2002
Format: Hardcover
Lewis and Rosa Rita are back again in Brad Strickland's terrifying chiller. Lewis Barnevelt and Rosa Rita are moving fast in this sci-fi mystery. Their tearing down the old bridge on Wilder Creek revealing the secrets it hides! You'll have to join in on this creepy mystery Strickland style!
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Format: Hardcover
As a hardcore Bellairs/Strickland fan and fellow writer, it was with no small amount of pleasure that I found this one sitting on the library shelf and grabbed it, instantly knowing it would be a good read. Not many books can you do this with, few authors are talented enough that their books are given to be good before you read them.
This book is no exception. I was a very picky fan of John Bellairs, and when Brad Strickland began carrying on his work I was highly skeptical that he would be able to fill the shoes of an incredibly talented author. Not only has he done so with an uncanny ability to emulate Mr. Bellairs' style, he has also gone on to write some pretty memorable adventures involving the Bellairs characters.
I found this book to be one of the more inventive and memorable ones in the entire Bellairs/Strickland history since the Trolley to Yesterday. Strickland was not afraid to go to the same lengths that Bellairs himself did to give the reader a good scare, and I really enjoyed the added sci-fi element in this book.
Well done, Mr. Strickland!
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Format: Hardcover
Hard-core Bellairs fans, take up your hardcover Dial copies of "The House With a Clock in its Walls" and BLUDGEON! BLUDGEON the atrocity that is this book! ...Maybe I'm overreacting just a smidge. Nixing the theatrics, this book is typical hackneyed Strickland-as-Bellairs fare.. you can tell that he's trying, and he DOES imitate the style well. However, he falls flat when injecting the gloomy Catholic undertone, and the entire Clabbernong-farm thing was lifted COMPLETELY from a much better Bellairs book, "The Face in the Frost." Also, the Lovecraftian bits are good but not great -- but I'm happy to see that Strickland can get as gruesome as Bellairs could. The villains were more obnoxious than terrifying, and woefully underdeveloped. Yep. This was certainly a book, but I'm not buying it.
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