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Beautiful Boy: A Father's Journey Through His Son's Addiction Hardcover – Feb 26 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; First Edition edition (Feb. 26 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618683356
  • ISBN-13: 978-0618683352
  • Product Dimensions: 2.6 x 14.4 x 21.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 476 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #268,197 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Ian Gordon Malcomson HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on April 10 2009
Format: Paperback
David Sheff, a professional journalist, has written a powerful account of his journey with his son, Nic, as he attempts to help him to recover from a meth addiction. This is a real-life story that is filled with a gamut of emotions such as fear, compassion, frustration and triumph. What is most compelling about his recollections is that they follow in an easy-to-read prose the daily struggles that both parent and son endure in order to get a handle on this deadly addiction. What Sheff ends up telling his readers is how to build a long-standing filial relationship with an addicted son by practicing love leavened with a lot of mercy and wisdom. On a more practical level, Sheff provides his readers with all the gruesome and sordid details of what it is like to become a crack addict, right down to the physiological and mental destruction such a dependency causes. I picked up the book because it was recommended to me by another colleague on staff who deals with crack users in her program. As I read it over a couple of nights, I couldn't help feeling that Sheff is a very unique person who expresses a solid commitment to seeing healing taking place in his son's life as well as his own. Seeing the tangible proof of Sheff's genuinely heartfelt desire to help his son while knowing that it might still not be enough make a difference is the real reward of reading this book. I was personally challenged to understand afresh what it really means to be a parent of a child going through such agonizing adversity.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Erol Aydin on Sept. 3 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is an excellent self observation of an entire family. David Sheff takes us to his own and his son's painful journey in fight with addiction and proofs that once a father always a father. A father never looses hope, never gives up even though sons and daughters give up. My boy always will be the "beautiful boy" addict or non addict.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Marc Lewis on Aug. 28 2012
Format: Paperback
Memoirs of an Addicted Brain: A Neuroscientist Examines his Former Life on DrugsI don't have much to add to the excellent comments above. But I read the book about 2 years ago, and it was completely heart-breaking. Having been an addict myself, this was one of the few books that brought me tightly into the perspective of "the other" -- the family -- those who get hurt almost as much as you do, in fact maybe more. It's one of the few accounts I've read that get you to hate addiction without having to stoop to a moral judgment, one way or the other.
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