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Beauty and the Werewolf [Mass Market Paperback]

Mercedes Lackey
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
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Book Description

May 22 2012 A Tale of the Five Hundred Kingdoms
The magic continues in New York Times bestselling authorMercedes Lackey's enchanting Tale of the Five Hundred Kingdoms, when a beauty must battle some beasts before she rescues her prince... 

The eldest daughter is often doomed in fairy tales. But Bella-Isabella Beauchamps, daughter of a wealthy merchant-vows to escape the usual pitfalls. 

Anxious to avoid the traditional path, Bella dons a red cloak and ventures into the forbidden forest to consult with "Granny," the local wisewoman. But on the way home she's attacked by a wolf-who turns out to be a cursed nobleman. Secluded in his castle, Bella is torn between her family and this strange man who creates marvelous inventions and makes her laugh-when he isn't howling at the moon. 

Bella knows all too well that breaking spells is never easy. But a determined beauty, a wizard (after all, he's only an occasional werewolf) and a little Godmotherly interference might just be able to bring about a happy ending....


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Review

"Lackey's satisfying fairy tale will captivate fantasy readers with its well-imagined world and romance fans, who will relish the growing relationship and sexy scenes."

-Booklist on The Fairy Godmother

"Fans of Lackey's Valdemar series as well as general fantasy enthusiasts should enjoy this classic fairy tale with a pair of proactive, resourceful heroes."

-Library Journal on Fortune's Fool

"[P]lenty of twists and laughs...most of the fun comes from finding all the fairy tale in-jokes peppering the pages.

-Publishers Weekly on The Sleeping Beauty

"A delightful fairy tale revamp. Lackey ensures that familiar stories are turned on their ear with amusing results. Appealing characters faced with challenging circumstances keep the plot lively. You don't want to mess with godmothers!"

- RT Book Reviews on The Snow Queen

About the Author

New York Times bestselling author Mercedes Lackey has written over one hundred titles and has no plans to slow down. Known best for her tales of Valdemar and The Five Hundred Kingdoms, she's also a prolific lyricist and records her own music.

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4.0 out of 5 stars Fun read Dec 18 2012
By ggn
Format:Mass Market Paperback
As in the other 'fairy tales' of this series it is a good, fun read. Lackey always puts an interesting twist on the tale, so it matters not that the plot is lifted from a well known story. They are a light read. Do not expect this series to be as engrossing as her Valdemar series, but they are good entertainment none-the-less.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another work of Art March 1 2012
Format:Hardcover
Mercedes Lackey's Beauty and the Werewolf is another wonderfully re-imagined classical fairy tale. Where a young, well to do woman is whisked from her stable and routine life, and placed into the care of the local lord, with very little explanation as to why. This story though based on a well known fairy tale will happily surprise readers. The world Lackey has created is a magical and complex place. Lackey's characters are well imagined and thought out giving life to the story, Bella (Isabella) is a very likeable and easy to emphasize with, sympathetic to those around her, she is quick witted with a sharp tongue, without coming across as rude. Sebastian the local is a sweet character, if a bit reclusive. For the most part Lackey kept the story moving at a good pace thought the end felt slightly rushed, not enough to pull readers from the story but enough to be noticed, the book may have benefitted from another five to ten pages for more in-depth explanations and solid ending. Over all this novel lives up to all expectations set by her previous books, and will leave readers wanting more.

Anxiously anticipating Lackey next novel

Bookworm4life
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Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  133 reviews
32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Some weaknesses, but charming. Nov. 2 2011
By Cally Steussy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
This is, I think, one of the better installments of the 500 Kingdoms series. Mercedes Lackey has clearly taken to heart some of the lessons from The Sleeping Princess: the overall tone of the book is much more tongue-in-cheek and playful, without the attempt to make everything deep and dramatic, and also relatively free of (as another reviewer phrased it) the preachiness that has marked some of the other books in this series. In addition, the romantic relationship between the protagonists is handled very well, without the feeling of "I need a romance, let me throw it in out of nowhere" that some of the earlier books suffered.

Bella is a mostly likeable protagonist, although she still has some of those requisite "more practical than thou" moments. (They're a staple of this series in particular, and they get a little tiresome after the third or fourth book.) One point that I did find somewhat disappointing was the way her character development was handled: unlike the standard heroines of the 500 Kingdoms, Bella starts out with an unexplicated but quite visible selfish streak. There was one point in the book where she thinks that the werewolf can't possibly feel as bad about her situation than she does. This is a man who has lived as a complete hermit for five years in terror of the thought that he might cause exactly this situation! Bella does grow up, by watching how her family pulls together to deal with her absence. I just kept waiting for a moment where she would acknowledge that perhaps she did not give Sebastian sufficient credit when she first met him.

Sebastian is a completely endearing character as well. Like Seigfried in The Sleeping Princess, he takes one of the classic MALE stereotypes of folklore - in his case, the absentminded, unworldly scholar - and both plays to his stereotype and goes beyond it. He is unworldly, but he is also a powerful and skilled sorcerer who clearly takes his responsibilities seriously. (Which is part of why Bella's failure to acknowledge that side of his character grated somewhat.)

Oddly enough, however, my favorite part of this story was probably the villain. Villains are often a major weakness in Lackey's books - either they come from nowhere in the very end of the book (as was the case in The Fairy Godmother), or they are so blatantly, utterly evil that they're hard to believe. That was not the case in this book. On the one hand, it was more or less obvious who the culprit was by the end of the fourth chapter, which was one of the major weaknesses of the book - with only three central characters, there wasn't even a red herring to divert suspicion temporarily. On the other hand, the villain actually showed that in addition to his nastiness, he was also a responsible person in his own way, aware of his own failings, and even well-intentioned in a short-sighted way. (I also can't help but think that Godmothers and their ilk are so used to thinking of things in terms of The Tradition that they forget basic psychology and profiling in looking for culprits!)

Final analysis: fans of Mercedes Lackey will definitely enjoy this story; it's a fast, entertaining read, endearing, and it patches some of the more common plotholes in Lackey's writing. Those new to her writing should probably read The Fairy Godmother and perhaps The Sleeping Princess first - but this would be a good third choice.
33 of 37 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A reasonable continuation of the series Oct. 31 2011
By Rover - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Beauty and the Werewolf is the sixth and latest installment in the Tales of the Five Hundred Kingdoms presented by the talented Mercedes Lackey. Like last year's Sleeping Beauty, Lackey is building fairy tales on the well known and well-traveled landscapes we all know, and then throwing a hard left-right that leaves all of the figures scrambled and everyone saying someone else's lines.

Surprisingly, this year's Beauty is not nearly the departure from traditional storytelling that last year's was. In this story, our "beauty" is named, predictably, "Bella" and is the oldest of a blended family of three girls. As is proper and traditional, Bella is the self-created head of the household. Her useless but assuredly not wicked stepmother spends her time in the bliss of mild hypochondria, cared for by well-meaning and understanding old gents who do their best to keep her happy with her gossip and warm wraps. Bella's sweet and empty-headed twin step-sisters are merely the first gatekeepers to the plot; they are used and promptly discarded literally 20 pages into the story.

Bella throws on her crimson winter wrap, and tromps off into the forest Red-Hood-style to visit the old wise woman in the woods. While on her way to Granny's house, Bella runs into the very disagreeable woodsman Eric, who warns her away from the woods. Bella rebuffs and rebukes him quite strongly, has a lovely visit with Granny, and is promptly bitten by a werewolf - the reclusive Duke Sebastian - on her way home. And with that werewolf attack, Lackey snatches the plot off of the Red Riding Hood path and drops it firmly onto the Beauty and the Beast plot line, delivering Bella to Duke Sebastian's castle to live out a three-month quarantine on her werewolf bite.

In this series, which began with The Fairy Godmother, Lackey takes the fairy tales we remember (Rapunzel, etc.), reminds us of the trope and expectations within each, and then promptly twists them around into new stories and new endings. The mindless magical force that drives many of the life stories within the Five Hundred Kingdoms is The Tradition. The Tradition gets its magic from the repetition of stories around the fireplaces - the faith of the common people - but is agnostic about any particular endings, good or bad. The Fairy Godmothers, Sorcerers, and other Tradition-educated magic users are constantly in a battle of wits and wills to manipulate The Tradition's force into happy endings (which might not be the actual traditional ending). The readers learn about the forces involved as the characters - Bella and Sebastian - find themselves feeling oddly emotional in times and places when it does not make logical sense.

The strengths of this book, and the series, are the characters themselves. Bella is amazingly self-aware and logical about her situation, and horribly stubborn in going about her rebellion. While she rebels against being manipulated by the characters in the castle where she is moved to live out her possible werewolf quarantine, she also explores the reasons for the werewolf's existence and the woodsman's horrid attitude. She also pursues wide-ranging studies, and finally figures out what The Tradition can do for her when she decides what she wants for a solution.
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Beauty Is the Beast March 19 2012
By Amanda M. Hayes - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
I've read most of the Five Hundred Kingdoms series, but I'm not exactly a fan. I pick up each new one as I see it because the loyalty Mercedes Lackey inspired in me in my teens is hard to shake. I find Ms. Lackey's prose engaging even when I want to strangle her characters or take a hatchet to the soapbox they're standing on, but this may be the last of her Luna books for me.

There are a lot of problems here. The lesser ones (a padded story, the soapboxes, grammatical errors) have been endemic to Lackey for awhile now and shouldn't be more troubling here than elsewhere. Worse is that Lackey already retold this fairy tale and did a much better job of it in _Fire Rose_. If you've read that book, you know how this one will go--although you could probably guess within three chapters either way. In _Fire Rose_ the romantic lead was a flawed man, the heroine a sympathetic figure, the setting more distanced from the traditional and familiar, and the stakes more compelling. I liked Sebastian, but he's an innocent victim and less interesting for it than Jason Cameron, whose condition was of his own making. As for Bella--

Ugh, Bella. Give me Disney's Belle, Robin McKinley's Beauty, or Lackey's own Rose Hawkins any day, please, over this arrogant, bossy, self-important character. This quote sums her up for me: '[...] she might as well order him about while he was feeling guilty enough to listen and go along with her.' She won't shut up in her mind or her speech about how much she's owed for something that wasn't Sebastian's fault. She finds it appropriate to order around Sebastian's servants and take control of his household. She condemns snide comments and generalities about women, which would be reasonable if she didn't make her own snide generalities about men or hold women who aren't like herself in such contempt. By the midway point of the book I wished Sebastian would choose solitude over her company. Other reviewers have said, and I agree, that he and Bella have no chemistry anyway.

The book picks up for awhile in the latter third and I considered moving it up to three stars on the strength of some of the scenes there, but the predictable ending disappointed me. Besides, even though I enjoyed those scenes, I'm not sure what point they served. I would rather have read about Bella developing certain talents that ended up critical to the finale but were established almost entirely off-camera.

Not only has this story been done better by other writers, but it's been done better by Lackey--with an intelligent, sensitive heroine who managed to be neither a damsel in distress nor egocentric! Seek out _Fire Rose_ if you want to see Lackey's take on Beauty and the Beast. Me, I'm going on a sabbatical from the Kingdoms.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Forgettable Fairy Tale Formula June 4 2012
By Astral - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
The idea for Mercedes Lackey's "Tales of the Five Hundred Kingdoms" book series is a sound one. Take a handful of well established fairy tales and turn them on their nose. Give us the beloved story but offer enough twists to keep it fresh, all the while referencing "The Tradition". This world basically operates on what they call "The Tradition", which is when magic attempts to influence people into following certain story paths, such as the knight and the damsel in distress, princess being kidnapped by a dragon, etc. The characters in her books attempt to resist the magic and go their own way with the help of Godmothers, greatly powerful magic users who are able to shape and influence The Tradition and keep peace in their respective kingdoms.

It is all very clever and the potential for thrilling stories in this setting is nearly infinite. However, Lackey seems to be running out of ideas and the last few books in this series have barely made it above extremely bland Harlequin romance territory (without all the ripping bodices even!). The Beauty here is Bella. She has grown up with two flighty stepsisters and a stepmother who can't seem to run a household despite obvious intelligence. Bella stepped into the role, so her father could concentrate on his business and that's all she's known since. She's in the very dawn of her 20s but is already considered a spinster and an old maid (and acts as if she is in her early 60s rather than her early 20s). A little trip in the forest to visit the local Granny (a kind of wisewoman) leads to Bella encountering a werewolf and being bitten. She's whisked away to a manor by the King's orders to be watched to make sure she won't turn into a were-creature, and is put face to face with the one who bit her (who is not quite what she expected).

Unfortunately this is as spicy and dicey as the novel ever gets. The werewolf is a Duke who has been put under some kind of spell where he turns into a wolf for three nights a month. Bella being headstrong and manipulative decides to re-arrange the household and start ordering the invisible magicked servants around as if it were her own house. She's bullheaded, arrogant and constantly reminding others of how entitled she is for this or that. The Duke is a wizard and a dreamer, easily cowed and infinitely apologetic over the nibble he took out of Bella's foot. By the halfway point, I was wishing he had eaten her for breakfast, as Bella continues to subdue his household, ride around in the woods on poacher patrol with the Gamesman on her little mule and enjoy music sessions played by the invisible servants. Nothing much particularly happens. Not for at least several hundred pages, as we are treated to dinner orders, lots of eating, and plenty of whining about her predicament (being trapped to the grounds of a spectacular mansion... how horrible). She is even allowed contact with her family every day but it is still not enough for the controlling Bella, who can't seem to even imagine how her stepmother and stepsisters could order a servant around without her (which they do fine, much to her chagrin).

If you are looking for something deep in The Tradition, it isn't mentioned much in the first half of the book, and only tokenly thereafter. If you want a romance, it's pretty bare of that as well. The brash Woodsman Eric seems a likely choice since there is zero spark between the bold Bella and the dreamer Duke. However, that's scrapped and she suddenly falls for the way Sebastian pushes his glasses around the bridge of his nose. They hold hands. There's a dramatic bit at the very end... but it feels unnatural and contrived. The twists can be spotted from the very beginning, and you hope that it's going to twist away into another path, yet never does.

A boring book, with an annoying leading lady... let's hope that next time Lackey feels a bit more inspired and delivers something intriguing in this world. The Tradition should demand it.
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read Oct. 22 2011
By G. Robinson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
This is not the book to start the 500 Kingdoms with. It is a bit more sophisticated but implicitly relies on some knowledge of the world that the author has built. Any of the previous novels would be a good starting point for this one.

This has an interesting cast of characters who are well developed and a villain who isn't a cardboard cutout. Nice plot as well as characters. A lot of humor some obvious some sly. Absent the common annoying editorial errors so prevalent any more. If you are a fan of the 500 Kingdoms this is great, if not read a book earlier in the series and then this one.

Starts out like Red Ridding Hood but then takes a sharp turn and then another.
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