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Begin to Hope


Price: CDN$ 12.21 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
18 new from CDN$ 5.21 12 used from CDN$ 4.27

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Begin to Hope + Far + What We Saw From The Cheap Seats
Price For All Three: CDN$ 42.88

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  • In Stock.
    Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • Far CDN$ 13.52

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    FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ CDN$ 25. Details

  • What We Saw From The Cheap Seats CDN$ 17.15

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 13 2006)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Bros
  • ASIN: B000FFJ80I
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,874 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Fidelity
2. Better
3. Samson
4. On The Radio
5. Field Below
6. Hotel Song
7. Apres Moi
8. 20 Years Of Snow
9. That Time
10. Edit
11. Lady
12. Summer In The City


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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

By Peter Cantelon TOP 500 REVIEWER on May 20 2008
Format: Audio CD
Such a powerfully creative talent in Regina Spektor! This album contains some very memorable and imaginative songs.

Spektor's song writing abilities remind one of Leonard Cohen and her playful voice has similarities to Yael Naim. Despite these similarities Spektor is a talent unto her own, unique in style and content.

Songs on this album worth listening to on a regular basis include Samson, Fidelity, Apres Moi, Hotel Song and Summer in the City (although they are all good).

It is rare to find such a complete album in terms of quality and listenability. Highly recommended!
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By Mike Salvatores on Jan. 29 2008
Format: Audio CD
Russian-born Regina Spektor is a truly refreshing voice in the world of female singer-songwriterdom.
She's often been compared with Tori Amos, but really, her sound is entirely her own, mixing a wide variety of musical influences and flavors - everything from jazz and classical (she's a classically-trained pianist) to traditional Russian and Jewish music.
Her voice is distinctive and unique, as are her lyrics and songwriting: unconventional song structures and vocal techniques abound, making this CD both involving and rewarding.
Spektor might be something of an acquired taste for some, but believe me, it's a taste worth acquiring.
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 25 2007
Format: Audio CD
In her previous three albums, Regina Spektor specialized in quirky anti-folk. Piano, odd melodies and poetic lyrics.

But Spektor tries a new sound in her long-awaited fourth album, "Begin to Hope." Instead of anti-folk, her music here is more polished and poppier... or perhaps it's anti-pop. Either way, while this album has its middling moments, most of the songs are still Regina Spektor at her best.

It kicks off with the oddball "Fidelity," a trilling little song with the piano edged in synth. Spektor doesn't fare quite as well in the second one, which sounds too generic for her talents -- guitar pop with only a dash of piano, and only a few of her vocal flourishes.

But then the album changes, as if Spektor feels she's done enough "typical" pop. Instead she switches to the soft-edged piano melody of "Samson" ("You are my sweetest downfall"), followed by a strong string of songs that stick to her strengths: piano anti-folk (or anti-pop), and songs that don't sound like anything "On the Radio."

Instead she leans on soft piano ballads, silky piano folk and jagged little rock songs. Songs like "Edit" and "20 Years of Snow" are pure Spektor, with the cascading piano melody and the quirky singing, while "That Time" is a strange, mocking little rocker about reading Shakespeare and burying bits of a cat's body. The finale is a quiet, meditative song about loneliness in the city, and missing the one you love. For anyone who misses a lover, this will be a heart-tugger.

And the special edition has a bonus EP, perhaps for fans who adore her quirkier side. There are the bittersweet piano ballads like "Another Town" ("my soul feels so old!"), the bittersweet "Baobabs" and "Dusseldorf.
Read more ›
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By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on Feb. 22 2007
Format: Audio CD
In her previous three albums, Regina Spektor specialized in quirky anti-folk. Piano, odd melodies and poetic lyrics.

But Spektor tries a new sound in her long-awaited fourth album, "Begin to Hope." Instead of anti-folk, her music here is more polished and poppier... or perhaps it's anti-pop. Either way, while this album has its middling moments, most of the songs are still Regina Spektor at her best.

It kicks off with the oddball "Fidelity," a trilling little song with the piano edged in synth. Spektor doesn't fare quite as well in the second one, which sounds too generic for her talents -- guitar pop with only a dash of piano, and only a few of her vocal flourishes.

But then the album changes, as if Spektor feels she's done enough "typical" pop. Instead she switches to the soft-edged piano melody of "Samson" ("You are my sweetest downfall"), followed by a strong string of songs that stick to her strengths: piano anti-folk (or anti-pop), and songs that don't sound like anything "On the Radio."

Instead she leans on soft piano ballads, silky piano folk and jagged little rock songs. Songs like "Edit" and "20 Years of Snow" are pure Spektor, with the cascading piano melody and the quirky singing, while "That Time" is a strange, mocking little rocker about reading Shakespeare and burying bits of a cat's body. The finale is a quiet, meditative song about loneliness in the city, and missing the one you love. For anyone who misses a lover, this will be a heart-tugger.

And the special edition has a bonus EP, perhaps for fans who adore her quirkier side. There are the bittersweet piano ballads like "Another Town" ("my soul feels so old!"), the bittersweet "Baobabs" and "Dusseldorf.
Read more ›
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