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Beginning Access 2000 VBA [Paperback]

Robert Smith , Dave Sussman
3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
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Book Description

April 3 2000 0764543830 978-0764543838 1
What is this book about?

Access 2000 is an important part of the Office 2000 program suite, and is available on both the Premium and Professional editions of Office 2000. Access has traditionally been the Office suite database program par excellence. It still remains that way, but with Office 2000 the face of Access is changing. This book will look at the traditional role of Access and its future uses in the Office suite.

Using VBA (Visual Basic for Applications), the user can program his or her own programs in what is essentially a subset of the Visual Basic programming languages. This is tremendously powerful, as it allows you to create great User Interfaces (forms etc), as a front end to actual database storage and manipulation. This continues to be one of the great strengths of programming Access VBA.

This book updates, expands and improves Beginning Access 97 VBA Programming, in an Office 2000 setting. All the great tutorial content, teaching people how to program with VBA in Access is there, but now majorly rewritten to take account of Office 2000.

  • Updated to take account of the Office 2000 facilities
  • Constructs a substantial example application with VBA
  • Database theory taught in the Wrox Beginning style

What does this book cover?

In this book, you will learn how to

  • Construct a substantial example application with VBA
  • Master the foundations of Visual Basic for Applications
  • Understand the concepts behind classes and objects
  • Understand how Automation can be used to link Office applications
  • Create custom objects using the Class Module feature
  • Debug your programs and implement robust error handling
  • Add support for multiple users
  • Publish your Access database on the Internet
  • Optimize and add polish to your finished database application

Who is this book for?

This book is for users who already have a basic knowledge of databases and the basic Access objects, such as tables, queries, forms and reports. You now want to expand on your existing knowledge of Access and wish to learn how to program in VBA. You don't need any prior programming experience, although a basic knowledge of Access macros would be helpful.


Product Details


Product Description

From the Publisher

This book is for the Access user who already has a knowledge of databases, and the basic objects of an Access database, who now wants to learn how to program with VBA. No need of prior knowledge of programming required. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

Access 2000 is the fifth version of the hugely successful desktop database from Microsoft. When it was first released in 1992, Access immediately gained praise for its ease of use and power. Each release of Access has added features and increased usability, and with Access 2000 we now have a unified development environment for the whole of the Office 2000 suite of applications. Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is the programming language that gives Access its real power, allowing you to automate complex tasks and create applications with more scope and flexibility than is possible with its default forms and macros. VBA has a simple syntax allowing even complete novices to learn programming with very little effort, and this book illustrates the concepts with plenty of examples and exercises.

Who is this book for?

This book is for users who already have a basic knowledge of databases and the basic Access objects, such as tables, queries, forms and reports. You now want to expand on your existing knowledge of Access and wish to learn how to program in VBA. You don’t need any prior programming experience, although a basic knowledge of Access macros would be helpful.

What does this book cover?

  • Constructing a substantial example application with VBA
  • Mastering the foundations of Visual Basic for Applications
  • Understanding the concepts behind classes and objects
  • How Automation can be used to link Office applications
  • Creating custom objects using the Class Module feature
  • How to debug your programs and implement robust error handling
  • Adding support for multiple users
  • Publishing your Access database on the Internet
  • How to optimize and add polish to your finished database application

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
You can achieve a great deal in Access without ever knowing anything about programming at all. Read the first page
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Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It's Good But Not For Absolute Beginners March 6 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
This is a solid book, nicely written, and the authors have obviously put a lot of thought and good effort into it. However, in it's introduction, the authors advise that you don't really need to know anything about programming in order to understand the book. In my experience that's not correct. While a beginner can understand parts of the book, you soon get the feeling that you are in over your head. It gets into fairly complex code quite quickly. It would be a great book if you are taking a class or have a teacher to explain the parts that need clarification. But for a beginner like myself trying to learn VBA on my own, it's too much too soon. Another thing that this book (or any book) could do to help you learn is provide a lot of problems at the end of each chapter for you to try and apply what you learned, sort of the way we learned algebra in high school.
Evan Callahan's Book, Step By Step Microsoft Access VBA is a much more basic beginner's book. It takes you by the hand and gets you writing code quickly. It does not take you very far into VBA, but does get you going.
The next book I'd recommend is VBA Handbook by Susan Novalis. It's a much more gentle intro than is Sussman's book. In fact, after you learn Novalis' book you will probably be ready for Sussman's book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars not a bad book to learn VBA Feb. 2 2001
By "ewon"
Format:Paperback
This is a great book that covers many important aspects of VBA and access programming. The title "Beginning" of this book, however, is a bit misleading, because the pace is probably too fast for people who are new to coding. The exercises at the end of each chapter usually require the readers to use new things not covered in the book, so most of the time, I would have to look at the answers first, and then try to understand how the problems are solved. Therefore I feel that the authors are trying to jam in as much information as they possibly can on the topics within limited space. Fortunately the explanations for the codes are well done, and the author stick to their promise that this is a book about the VBA, not 'How-to-use-access'. The authors stick with DAO all through the book and leave out ADO entirely. I agree with them on that decision, so that one can really get a good feel for DAO and not lose focus trying to learn 2 technologies at once. If you can go through this book and understand the concepts and details, I would recommend, as the next step, a developer's reference, such as Access 2000 Developers' Handbook from Sybex.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
I have about 12 books on Access development in my bookcase and this is one that I can't stop reading. Why? Because it's done like I think a good beginners book should be. Many books contain a lot of babbling and not enough 'good' examples. This one is different.
Hundreds of useful examples, well explained, waiting to be typed (or used from the CD) can be found. The book explains very well their choice of using DAO over ADO, I thing it's a very good idea. As far as I'm concerned, I thing it's one of the best solid introduction to Access VBA you can find. As an Access teacher, I found some very good concepts and approaches in their projects.
You're very familiar with Access interface? Was exposed to VBA a little? Willing to bring your apps to new heights? Want to see some examples? Then this book IS for you. The pace is reasonable, the writing is great, there are easy to more complex concepts explained. As the title implies, this is a beginning VBA book, not a developer's handbook. But don't be misled by the word 'Beginning', there is serious stuff in there like Class objects, networking issues and approaches to solving good problems.
You're tired of books saying, you could do this or do that without explaining how? This book is not like that. Finally, a book that left out that Northwind omnipresent database and came up with something different!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
By Norm
Format:Paperback
Do you really want to learn code? Do you even know what DAO and ADO are? When you do get behind Forms into VBA do you know what all that syntax means? Are you writing your own Functions? Do you know what every line of this code means? If you answer 'no' to any of these questions, get this book. It is great! You'll learn the nuts and bolts of Access 2000 and VBA. You will have to apply yourself some. I now know what this code means because I wrote it (and dozens and dozens of more lines) and you can too! (the code got messed up by the review formatting)
Private Sub SaveThisRecord_Click() Dim db As Database Dim rec As Recordset Set db = CurrentDb() Set rec = db.OpenRecordset("tbljobhoursdetail") rec.AddNew rec!EmployeeID.Value = Me![Text2].Value rec("job#").Value = Me("txtjob#").Value rec!DateWorked = Me!txtDateWorked.Value rec.Update rec.Close End Sub
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice follow up to Access 97 VBA Jan. 3 2002
Format:Paperback
I previously bought Access 97 VBA and recently ran into problems in Access 2000. After realizing that I was lost just enough to do damange to myself and my job, I bought this book. It explains the differences between ADO and DAO, which was the cause of most of my troubles, very well. As was the case with the 97 version, the examples clearly show how to do most of the things that I wanted to accomplish. This is listed as a beginning book but I think I'd recommend having some programming experience first. This is a nice companion to the 97 version or just a good place to start in on extending the functionality of Access 2000 with VBA.
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Most recent customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars How to make VBA impossibly confusing
The book seems to be written with the objective of showcasing how much the authors know about VBA without imparting any of this understanding to the reader. Read more
Published on May 24 2004 by Kelvin Dickenson
3.0 out of 5 stars Only two complaints
Overall, yes it is a very good book, but I have two issues with it.
1. The authors sometimes give code examples that use functions/syntax that are not explained until several... Read more
Published on May 17 2004 by Joe
5.0 out of 5 stars I know..it's 2004 but this book f*cking rocks!
Yeah, I still use Access 2000, but so freakin' what? Can most folks really justify the cost of upgrading to Access 2002/2003? Didn't think so...anyway, this book is just pure gold! Read more
Published on March 5 2004 by Tiffany Norman
5.0 out of 5 stars Pork loaf
Best book on VBA i've ever had the misfortune of reading. Not the most pleasant of subjects, but this book did a masterful job of presenting ideas, structures and syntax in a... Read more
Published on Sept. 12 2003 by ex12ex34ax311ab10
5.0 out of 5 stars Detailed examples, clear progression, lucid explanations.
I felt this book was written for me. I received it, turned to chapter 8, and there in front of me was a solution I had been searching for weeks. Read more
Published on March 18 2003 by AlexanderBanning
5.0 out of 5 stars Where have all the Macros gone?
After developing in Access & SQL Server for a number of years, I was always intimidated by VB development and had made a conscious effort to develop "work-arounds" for my lack... Read more
Published on Nov. 15 2002 by Jake Ledgerwood
4.0 out of 5 stars A book for people with no programming background
Maybe a good book for people with no programming background. For people coming from other programming languages, look elsewhere, unless you want to go through the basic concepts... Read more
Published on May 23 2002 by calvinyw
2.0 out of 5 stars Definitely NOT recommended for the beginner
I bougth this book and discovered that it was not for someone like me just learning Access VBA.
In fact I had to buy Access 2000 VBA Handbook by Susann Novalis (ISBN... Read more
Published on Feb. 16 2002
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Yet
Thank You!
Your publication, Beginning Access VBA 2000 is just what I need to learn VBA. I have several other books on Access, but have not been able to learn how to use... Read more
Published on Jan. 21 2002 by Robert Pittman
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful guide to improve skills
This book can really improve your skills in vba if you're new to it; it is the book to own to start programming with VBA. Read more
Published on Nov. 7 2001 by Vladimiro Cerni
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