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Being There


Price: CDN$ 12.97 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Being There + A.M. + Summer Teeth
Price For All Three: CDN$ 33.72

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Oct. 29 1996)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Reprise
  • ASIN: B000002N7G
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  LP Record
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (73 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,752 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Misunderstood
2. Far, Far Away
3. Monday
4. Outtasite (Outta Mind)
5. Forget The Flowers
6. Red-Eyed And Blue
7. I Got You (At The End Of The Century)
8. What's The World Got In Store
9. Hotel Arizona
10. Say You Miss Me
Disc: 2
1. Sunken Treasure
2. Someday Soon
3. Outta Mind (Outta Sight)
4. Someone Else's Song
5. Kingpin
6. (Was I) In Your Dreams
7. Why Would You Wanna Live
8. The Lonely 1
9. Dreamer In My Dreams


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K on April 8 2004
Format: Audio CD
Like most double albums, this epic of ambient roots-rock has difficulty justifying its own self conscious hyperperbole (beyond, of coarse, the common excuse of "We wrote alotta stuff"). Detail production aside, Wilco connect here only when they pick up their electric instruments and go for broke; "Outta Sight (Outta Mind)", "Monday", and "At the End of the Century" set ambitions aside by basking in their own revelry. Being There is, otherwise, too padded to function as a wholely satisfying listen. Opener "Misunderstood" does happen upon a nicely lilting melody, but the remaining down-tempo material ("Hotel in Arizona", "Sunken Treasure", etc.) sacrifices hooks for light experimentation or genre integrity.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Kluge on Feb. 25 2004
Format: Audio CD
This was a fairly staggering conception, warts and all, and it wouldn't be until the next release that Wilco truly become masters of the artform, but it's quite a worthy, powerful ride for what it is. The record, for the first place, should have been on one CD and trimmed a bit. There are some half-songs ("Red Eyed and Blue," "I've Got You," which while peppy has some pretty dumb lyrics, and "Kingpin") and it gets a bit mired in its own moroseness towards the end (though "(Was I) In Your Dreams," Why Would You Want to Live," and "The Lonely 1" are all lovely songs in their own respects, it's a bit punishing to have them back to back to back), but there are such dizzying moments of transcendence on this record that you can mostly forgive it for its faults.
The two focal points of the record, "Misunderstood" and "Sunken Treasure," are powerful, emotionally geared epics that set the course for the whole record- themes of loss, betrayal, and distance. The whole record throbs with an organic closeness- the songs feel like they're no more than a few inches from reach. "Far Far Away" sounds like the band's encircling you in the studio, Jeff Tweedy in front of you strumming an aching melody. "Dreamer In My Dreams" is like a racous live take (hoe-down, even?), with some frenetic violin playing and an improvised feel with Tweedy's hoarse vocal.
One could say the record throbs with pain, as well- the sonic equivalent of pain and trying to be ambivalent about it. It's the band's most intimate recorded performance, and though they will aim for and achieve higher, this will hold a special place in any fan's heart too.
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By T. Bigney on July 26 2008
Format: Audio CD
Jeff Tweedy's first post-Uncle Tupelo venture began as all-around underwhelming substitute for hungry, belt-buckled alt-country fans: Wilco's humble debut, the twang-heavy country-pop offering A.M., contained virtually no hints of the band's potential for subtle sound-sketching. It wasn't until 1996's double-disc, the 19-track Being There, that Tweedy and company began tapping into the skittish, textured atmospherics that would-- nearly six years later-- secure them a fixed spot in the American canon. Being There is a notoriously inconsistent effort. Deeply ambitious, its missteps (see the overstated, Stones-lite faux-boogie of "Monday") were ultimately incapable of sullying the transcendence of its epic successes. Among those, opener "Misunderstood" pit 60s psychedelia (pinging strings, studio fuzz and unexpected splats of sound) against a sweet, spare piano melody, while "The Lonely 1" cemented the band's ability to eschew sentimentality without sacrificing warmth. Being There was Wilco's original coming-of-age, an occasionally awkward, ultimately profound transformation into something altogether new and beautiful.
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By Dano M on Nov. 26 2003
Format: Audio CD
Being a longtime fan of Wilco, I love introducing people to the group. While I was first introduced to 'AM', I think they really moved to another level with 'Being There'. The album foreshadows the directions that Wilco will take in the future, while still remaining attached to their progenitors, Uncle Tupelo. From the juxtaposition of the alt-country in 'Far Far Away' with the power pop of 'Monday' to the overwhealming saddness of 'Sunken Treasure' to the sheer joy that is evident in the rousing 'Dreamer in My Dreams', Wilco is found noodling around with many different ideas. Try to name a recent album that brings to mind everything from the Beatles to the Beach Boys (yes, the Beach Boys! Listen to the harmonies on Outta Mind, Outta Sight!) 'Being There' shows the band trying on so many different styles, experimenting with so many different paths to follow that this becomes a must for anyone attempting to follow the band's rise.
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By Train on Oct. 24 2003
Format: Audio CD
No one is playing and writing better music than Jeff Tweedy and Wilco these days. The guy has talent. Every song is diverse, yet still retains a style that is his own. One song may be a quiet ballad, the next a heavy rocker, then a country type song comes through. He makes use a so many instruments, piano, violyn, banjo, horns, wierd studio sounds all make up a sound that is just outstanding. Wilco is doing something very special now, and this music will be around for a long time.
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Format: Audio CD
This CD is just stupendous. Its awe inspiring almost. The 2nd CD by this amazing Chicago-based band leaves a fresh taste in your mouth. The CD manages to avoid the problem that many artists have of having all the songs sound the same. "Being There" has many different sounds to their songs, from the sweet country feel of "far, far away" to the almost Weezer-ish sound of "outta mind(outta site)"- all of which are driven by their impressive lyrics. If you like any of Wilco's other work, or if you appreciate good lyrics or slow mesmorizing melodies, you must buy this CD.
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