Quantity:1

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Syms/Bells/Symphonic Dances Box set


Price: CDN$ 23.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Usually ships within 3 to 6 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
17 new from CDN$ 19.84 6 used from CDN$ 17.20

Artists to Watch


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 22 2011)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 4
  • Format: Box set
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B004I7MCI4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,665 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Product Description

All of Pletnev's acclaimed Rachmaninov recordings with the Russian National Orchestra in a single box for the first time. Also includes the tone-poems The Rock and Isle of the Dead, and Taneyev's cantata John of Damascus. Sung texts and translations included.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Quel beau Coffret de 4 disques CD...Avec une douceur dans l`interprétation d`Orchestre sublime...avec un Chef au pupitre du nom...
de Mikhaïl Pletnev avec l`ensemble the Moscow State Chamber Choir pour la final...Formidable.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Have you ever heard the RNO dance? Not yet, you haven't. Sept. 25 2014
By Kalvin Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
One can accuse both Rachmaninoff and Pletnev in lacking sophistication (not something I do personally! I stand at odds with them only rarely), but this album is well-armored against that sentiment. Others have praised the sound and interpretation fairly thoroughly, so I concede I have little to offer.

My focus on this is the finale of the Symphonic Dances, which sounds almost "slow" before some other recordings I've flicked through. The concluding movement is a mad dash between opposing light and dark, not some laid-back mosey through the meadow. And it's not! Pletnev trades off raw speed for great nuance: the episodic leaps here and there are really brought into rosier contrast with the pace Pletnev sets. The sharp, sleek playing of the RNO under his baton does these works great justice at those tempi. This is especially true of the very end of the dances: they snuff themselves out with four (five) mighty chords spaced out like orchestral lightning strikes. It is hard to convey the sense of climax balanced so perfectly in those final chords - everything seems to fall in place, from the skittering triplets to the dreadful statements of "Dies Irae" - which have a real "snap" to them that I have a hard time finding in other recordings. Especially the final chord - I've never heard a sharper attack. For some reason the percussion seems to habitually overpower the orchestra in the finale - not so with Pletnev. It's there, but it's appropriate. Hats off to the DG recording team for balancing things so well. The fading sound of the gong gives me chills as the dances disappear like banished spirits.

The Taneyev, I should add, is a real treat. Pletnev has spoken very positively about Taneyev (contrast that with his opinion on Tchaikovsky; I recall he dismissed his symphonies in context of public demands against his artistic convictions) and certainly seems to have invested a great deal on "John of Damascus." The sonics seemed a little blurry on this, but I suppose that's just thick writing on Taneyev's part than any fault of the interpreters or the recording team. I developed a thorough enjoyment for this cantata after a few goes.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5 stars for the symphonies, if not for all the other works June 26 2014
By Long-time Listener - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I'm surprised to find myself giving Pletnev a 5-star rating here. Based on my previous contact with his music-making, I was pretty sure I didn't like his style--I thought his two-disc set of Scarlatti sonatas, and his conducting of the Beethoven symphonies, were ruined by exaggerated management of tempos and phrasing. But this is different. Pletnev's straightforward and sincere approach here produces excellent results, aided by beautiful orchestral playing and some of the nicest recorded sound for an orchestra I've heard in a long while.

Straightforward doesn't mean lacking in nuance, and these readings are informed with a natural grace and a romantic moodiness that ebbs and flows as it should. Pletnev's 1st isn't always played with the same abandon as, say, Ashkenazy's, but its climaxes are just as powerful, and its lines emerge more clearly--and melodies and orchestration don't have much effect (on me, anyway) if they can't be heard clearly. I think Pletnev's 1st is one of several recordings at the top of the heap. It also seems better to me than Jansons', but that is probably only due to the poor quality of recording given Jansons, since otherwise he seems to capture the sense and atmosphere of the work quite well. Rachmaninov's 2nd was slow going for me for a long time, but it was Pletnev's beautiful reading that finally opened my eyes (ears) to it. The 3rd is often said to be a weaker piece than the preceding symphony, and yes, with Pletnev conducting it sounds like a slightly lesser work than the 2nd, but only slightly, and I like the fact that I don't hear Pletnev trying to beautify or to inflate the material beyond what will naturally succeed. My only disappointment with this set really is the Symphonic Dances, often referred to as Rachmaninov's 4th symphony, which seem more earthbound under Pletnev's baton. I found his Isle of the Dead effective, but less so than Previn's, for example, although it's better than the early Fritz Reiner recording. At any rate, if Pletnev could make a believer out of someone who previously felt pretty lukewarm to Rachmaninov, it's entirely possible he could do the same for others as well. Here's hoping you have a chance to enjoy this set.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Rachmaninov Symphonies -- Russian National Orchestra Dec 18 2012
By Dr. Ian McKay - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The Russian National Orchestra's recording engineers selected an even balance between the orchestra's four sections, providing the listener with the auditory sense of being in the concert hall. Moreover, Pletnev was able to draw a pleasing bloom from the strings with the woodwind, brass and, especially, the percussion unobtrusive but coming to the fore when appropriate. Of the eight recordings I have of Rachmaninov's symphonies, this performance ranks second, pipped only by early recordings of the Scottish National Orchestra with Alexander Gibson. Of the second symphony only and in spite of my display of heathenism, my most exhilarating and scintillating recording is that of a concert performance by the Sydney Youth Orchestra (with which I have not been associated) under Henryk Pisarek in 1996.
2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Performances May Be Too Refined Oct. 17 2012
By JohnK - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
The best performances in this four-disc set are of The Isle of the Dead, The Rock, The Bells, and Taneyev's John of Damascus. Pletnev's Rachmaninov symphonies and Symphonic Dances are too refined and never really catch fire. While one appreciates Pletnev's attention to detail, performances by Previn, Ormandy, and Ashkenazy are far more exciting and involving than these.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback