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The Best American Travel Writing 2011 [Paperback]

Sloane Crosley , Jason Wilson

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Book Description

Oct. 4 2011 Best American
The Best American Series®
First, Best, and Best-Selling

The Best American series is the premier annual showcase for the country’s finest short fiction and nonfiction. Each volume’s series editor selects notable works from hundreds of magazines, journals, and websites . A special guest editor, a leading writer in the field, then chooses the best twenty or so pieces to publish. This unique system has made the Best American series the most respected—and most popular—of its kind.

The Best American Travel Writing 2011 includes

André Aciman, Christopher Buckley, Maureen Dowd,
Verlyn Klinkenborg, Ariel Levy, Téa Obreht, Annie Proulx,
Gary Shteyngart, William T. Vollmann,
Emily Witt, and others

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Mariner Books; 1 edition (Oct. 4 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0547333366
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547333366
  • Product Dimensions: 20.8 x 13.7 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 318 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #353,010 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"[Crosley's] selections succeed in piquing the armchair traveler’s wanderlust."
--Booklist

About the Author

Sloane Crosley is the author I Was Told There'd Be Cake, which was a finalist for the Thurber Prize for American Humor. Her second collection, How Did You Get This Number, finds her riffing on European vacation disasters and doing bridesmaid duty in Alaska. 


JASON WILSON is the drinks columnist at the Washington Post, the series editor of The Smart Set, and the author of Boozehound: On The Trail of the Rare, the Obscure, and the Overrated. He teaches at Drexel University.


Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  14 reviews
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sparkling Selections Feb. 3 2012
By Anne Burnik - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The criteria for selecting the pieces that make up this collection are stated in the Forward and in the Introduction to this collection of essays. Travel writing isn't guidebook information and a series of lists. Rather it is storytelling and approaching a place or certain locale from a different perspective that illuminates the subject matter by storytelling. It is a window into life as we don't know it. It presents the unexpected.

The travel writing in this anthology does just that. Each author presents life in a new and different light that makes the reader pause and think. We are given insight into the culture, geography, and history of a certain place or people through another's observation, description, analysis or comment.

The beauty of this collection is in the variety of places in the individual pieces and the particular voice of each author. Some essays are light and playful while others are quite serious. Ben Austen's "Southern Culture on the Skids" is a far cry from William Vollmann's "A Head for the Emir." Annie Proulx's "A Year of Birds" could also be described as excellent nature writing. "Miami Party Boom" by Emily Witt displays an edgy youth culture totally unfamiliar to suburbanites.

I'm not sure the articles in this volume are the very best of travel writing today since there is so much published in print and online, but each of these articles did provide the unexpected in an entertaining manner. Each essay presented a new experience for the reader, giving meaning to present life in an engaging manner that was fresh, original and creative. That's what I like.
40 of 50 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Love the Series, Hate the Kindle Table of Contents Oct. 13 2011
By J. Peyton - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
NOTE: This is not a review of the contents. This is a buyer beware notice:

Author names aren't included in the Kindle version table of contents. That may seem minor, but one of the great things about these anthologies is that you can skip around from author to author. The Kindle version makes it impossible to do this, which is frankly kind of annoying. The "Look Inside!" table of contents for the paperback version is what it should look like.

If you read anthologies from front to back, then ignore this "notice". If you're like me and you like to skip around by author (or even magazine), you might be better off buying the paperback. I wish I had.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great way to travel while curled up on the couch... Oct. 19 2013
By Katie Pickard Fawcett - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Every year I buy The Best American Travel Writing. A different editor every year and this is reflected in the essays that appear. It's always a great read and so much better than travel books that provide simply lists of hotels and attractions and places to eat. These essays let you walk the cities and trek the jungles and climb the mountains with the authors. If you like to travel or just read about travel, this is a great series.
10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A poor and motley selection April 4 2012
By Ewe Paik Leong - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Sloane Crosley, in doing her selections, has failed to see the forest for the trees. In searching for interesting tales from a literary point of view, she has overlooked the fundamental question: Is this essay travel related? A few of the essays, though well-written, cannot be pigeon-holed as travel writing of any sub-genre whatsoever. The biggest black eye is "Famous", which concerned a terrorist attack in Mumbai, India in 2008. The author narrated the attack, dwelled on the background of one terrorist, including describing his home. Bah! Who gives a damn about a worthless scum's motivation and background? Another story of a similar kind is "The Last Stand of Free Town". Here the author went to Copenhagen in 2004 and stumbled into riots in the district of Christiania. Interwoven with descriptions of the riotings are commentaries on the social/political circumstances at that time. Would a would-be traveller to Copenhagan bother with the politics of the country in 2004? If an out-of-state visitor had gone for a vacation in Dallas on November 22, 1963 and witnessed the assassination of President Kennedy, would his account of the event be classified as travel writing? I am not going to buy the 2012 edition of this series.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Always Great Aug. 13 2013
By Mark Price - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I look forward to these every year. They never disappoint. Yes, there are some authors and stories that you will enjoy more than others. But you are sure to find a few gems that you would not otherwise have come across. This is not guidebook travel writing. This is great travel storytelling.

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