Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Beyond Death Hardcover – Dec 12 2012


Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 34.77 CDN$ 11.62

Join Amazon Student in Canada



Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Smithsonian (Dec 12 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1560985127
  • ISBN-13: 978-1560985129
  • Product Dimensions: 26.1 x 18.5 x 1.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 608 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,694,557 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

By Atheen M. Wilson on July 4 2000
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit to a fascination with mummies that dates to when I first saw one at the Chicago museum as a child. I remember purchasing a slender volume at that time about mummies and their preparation, making myself a young "expert" on the subject. Over the years I have had the opportunity to see and read about other types of mummiform bodies including the wonderful collection of pharonic aristocracy at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo and the Inca collection in Lima, Peru. I've read with interest the discovery of the Chalcolithic Tyrolean mummy, Otzi the Iceman, of Jaunita and her "siblings" abandoned on the peaks of the Andes, and of the Tarium mummies of the China deserts. The Chinchorro mummies of Chile are an even earlier group of preserved human remains with which I was only vaguely familiar by virtue of a mention of them on an educational program on TV. Arriaza's book elaborates on the subject in considerable detail. It discusses their accidental discovery, their place in the history of South America, the methods of their creation, and of considerable interest to me as a nurse, their health as a population. In particular I learned that naturally occuring arsenic may have seriously affected the health of the people of the area. I had recently read of efforts made decades ago to improve the safety of water in India that had inadvertently gone awry, subjecting the population using the wells created to provide biotically pure water to increased levels of arsenic from ground water. Issues of public health are of interest to me and both of these and the possible introduction of lead into the Roman water system by it's efforts to improve public access to water are similar.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Mummies July 4 2000
By Atheen M. Wilson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit to a fascination with mummies that dates to when I first saw one at the Chicago museum as a child. I remember purchasing a slender volume at that time about mummies and their preparation, making myself a young "expert" on the subject. Over the years I have had the opportunity to see and read about other types of mummiform bodies including the wonderful collection of pharonic aristocracy at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo and the Inca collection in Lima, Peru. I've read with interest the discovery of the Chalcolithic Tyrolean mummy, Otzi the Iceman, of Jaunita and her "siblings" abandoned on the peaks of the Andes, and of the Tarium mummies of the China deserts. The Chinchorro mummies of Chile are an even earlier group of preserved human remains with which I was only vaguely familiar by virtue of a mention of them on an educational program on TV. Arriaza's book elaborates on the subject in considerable detail. It discusses their accidental discovery, their place in the history of South America, the methods of their creation, and of considerable interest to me as a nurse, their health as a population. In particular I learned that naturally occuring arsenic may have seriously affected the health of the people of the area. I had recently read of efforts made decades ago to improve the safety of water in India that had inadvertently gone awry, subjecting the population using the wells created to provide biotically pure water to increased levels of arsenic from ground water. Issues of public health are of interest to me and both of these and the possible introduction of lead into the Roman water system by it's efforts to improve public access to water are similar.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback