Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Bible Believers: Fundamentalists in the Modern World Hardcover – Dec 1987


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
CDN$ 0.78

Best Books of 2014
Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett’s tour of the world’s most unlikely micro-nations, moving villages, secret cities, and no man’s lands, is our #1 pick for 2014. See all


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 248 pages
  • Publisher: Rutgers Univ Pr (December 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813512301
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813512303
  • Product Dimensions: 21.3 x 14 x 1.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,999,662 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

Nancy Tatom Ammerman spent a year in 1979-1980 participating in, observing, and interviewing the members of a suburban Connecticut congregation, described on its church sign as "Independent, Fundamental, Premillennial, and Baptistic." Although she is not a fundamentalist, Ammerman's own background was similar enough for her to fit in easily and to be accepted and trusted.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
This is a good book, and I recommend it, but it's not perfect. Although Ammerman did a lot of ethnographic work, it seems like she relies mostly on interview material rather than direct observation, and that was sort of frustrating. I have to assume that if what she was told by her subjects had contradicted what she saw, she would have said so, but I still found myself wishing I had a clearer picture of daily life in the congregation. Still, I don't know of a better book on the same subject -- that such a good book as this has these limitations only shows how difficult a subject it was to tackle.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Paperback
Having read dozens of books on evangelical Christianity and Fundamentalism for my Masters Degree, this one truly stands out. Nancy Ammerman spent months with a medium-sized fundamentalist Church in New England, observing services, attending meetings, and interviewing members of the congregation. The result is this fine book that very fairly points out some of the successes and flaws of this church, and fundamentalism in general. It is well-footnoted and easy to read, quite an accomplishment in an academic book. I highly recommend it.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
Excellent book Nov. 30 2006
By cs - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This is an intelligent, well written book that conveys how Fundamentalists structure their lives and what their world view is. It was just perfect for my interest as a psychotherapist who is trying to understand this mindset in a client. The writing style is analytical without being ponderously academic, dry or theoretical. It is also extremely even-handed, neither favoring not condemning a mindset but rather just describing how Fundamentalists make sense of the world and what measures they take to maintain their beliefs in the face of the larger secular society. It assumes no religious bias on the part of the reader, which I find intelligent and refreshing. For me, it clarified in accessible, dispassionate terms what the (psychological) benefits of membership are, as well as the (psychological) sacrifices and limitations which membership imposes.
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
an important source on fundamentalist Christianity July 20 2001
By Lalalalaura - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a good book, and I recommend it, but it's not perfect. Although Ammerman did a lot of ethnographic work, it seems like she relies mostly on interview material rather than direct observation, and that was sort of frustrating. I have to assume that if what she was told by her subjects had contradicted what she saw, she would have said so, but I still found myself wishing I had a clearer picture of daily life in the congregation. Still, I don't know of a better book on the same subject -- that such a good book as this has these limitations only shows how difficult a subject it was to tackle.
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Excellent book. May 20 2011
By J. Reames - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I had Ammerman as a professor years ago. She knows the wherefore of which she speaks, having grown up in this background. The fact she can write about it with a fair hand, a *neutral* hand, says a lot about her grasp of cultural relativism. But it also gives her a unique insight as to exactly what makes these communities tick (and more largely, what drives Fundamentalism itself, as a worldview.)


Feedback