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Big Girls Don't Cry Paperback – Sep 2 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 345 pages
  • Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press (Sept. 2 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0871137593
  • ISBN-13: 978-0871137593
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 13.9 x 20.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 399 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,565,482 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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Slap, slap, slurp: a hollow, juicy sound. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Hardcover
She's done it again. In her succinct, dry way, Fay Weldon has succeeded in capturing the hopes, dreams, crushing defeats, and stunning recoveries that mark, bruise, and reshape the women of today. Her "Big Girls" are really a small group, every member flawed of course. She shows them tripping falling, fighting, succeeding. The problem is simple. These women decided it was easier to change the world than to change themselves. Of course, they do change, and the world is all the better for them having done so. Weldon's characters give us all a short, succinct course in feminist history, as they rise from humble beginnings (naked dancing in a living room for all to see) to forces to be reckoned with in publishing circles. They change the world. They change themselves. They change the reader. Weldon's wit is superb. She can say more in a few simple sentences than many writers can in several paragraphs (myself included).
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By A Customer on March 14 1999
Format: Hardcover
Fay Weldon's been funny before; let us hope she will again, 'cause she sure struck out this time. This thing is so utterly meanspirited that it had me wanting to kick men and smack women. Had I not been trapped on a cross-country flight with nothing else to read, I wouldn't have endured it. As it was, I wished I was able to open the window; I would have chucked it.
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Format: Hardcover
You would think that after having written so many novels, and all about the same subject -- love and it's many complexities -- that Weldon would slip into formula writing. And I am still waiting for this to happen. A Weldon fan for more than 10 years, I have yet to be disappointed. How many times can one person write about lovers who cheat on each other (I haven't read a single Weldon novel that didn't involve multiple shades of adultery) and still keep it fresh? Obviously many. I've always considered Weldon more of a "womanist" than a feminist, and she uses this opportunity to trash the feminist movement of the 70s. Her satire is deliciously biting as she examines everyone's disparate perspectives. You don't know whom to sympathize with on what page because you can be sure that whomever you respected at the opening of the novel you will surely despise somewhere along the way, and vice versa. I eagerly await each new Weldon novel knowing that I am in for a wild ride. I had the opportunity to hear her read many years ago from her (then) new novel Darcy's Utopia and have never read her novels the same way since. She's like a cross between Mother Goose and Lizzie Borden. I would highly recommend this novel (or any other Weldon novel) to anyone who enjoys to laugh out loud, both at the characters and at him/herself. And there is just no way to be offended because she offends everyone at some point. On a down side I will say that her ending was a bit predictable, which is surprising for an author who usually can turn the formulaics of life into something spontaneous and exciting to witness.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Vintage Weldon: Mother Goose with an acid tongue. Jan. 26 1999
By Archimago - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
You would think that after having written so many novels, and all about the same subject -- love and it's many complexities -- that Weldon would slip into formula writing. And I am still waiting for this to happen. A Weldon fan for more than 10 years, I have yet to be disappointed. How many times can one person write about lovers who cheat on each other (I haven't read a single Weldon novel that didn't involve multiple shades of adultery) and still keep it fresh? Obviously many. I've always considered Weldon more of a "womanist" than a feminist, and she uses this opportunity to trash the feminist movement of the 70s. Her satire is deliciously biting as she examines everyone's disparate perspectives. You don't know whom to sympathize with on what page because you can be sure that whomever you respected at the opening of the novel you will surely despise somewhere along the way, and vice versa. I eagerly await each new Weldon novel knowing that I am in for a wild ride. I had the opportunity to hear her read many years ago from her (then) new novel Darcy's Utopia and have never read her novels the same way since. She's like a cross between Mother Goose and Lizzie Borden. I would highly recommend this novel (or any other Weldon novel) to anyone who enjoys to laugh out loud, both at the characters and at him/herself. And there is just no way to be offended because she offends everyone at some point. On a down side I will say that her ending was a bit predictable, which is surprising for an author who usually can turn the formulaics of life into something spontaneous and exciting to witness.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Big girls can do whatever. . . Nov. 28 1999
By mmm - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
She's done it again. In her succinct, dry way, Fay Weldon has succeeded in capturing the hopes, dreams, crushing defeats, and stunning recoveries that mark, bruise, and reshape the women of today. Her "Big Girls" are really a small group, every member flawed of course. She shows them tripping falling, fighting, succeeding. The problem is simple. These women decided it was easier to change the world than to change themselves. Of course, they do change, and the world is all the better for them having done so. Weldon's characters give us all a short, succinct course in feminist history, as they rise from humble beginnings (naked dancing in a living room for all to see) to forces to be reckoned with in publishing circles. They change the world. They change themselves. They change the reader. Weldon's wit is superb. She can say more in a few simple sentences than many writers can in several paragraphs (myself included).
3 of 9 people found the following review helpful
Godawful wretched piece of tripe March 13 1999
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Fay Weldon's been funny before; let us hope she will again, 'cause she sure struck out this time. This thing is so utterly meanspirited that it had me wanting to kick men and smack women. Had I not been trapped on a cross-country flight with nothing else to read, I wouldn't have endured it. As it was, I wished I was able to open the window; I would have chucked it.

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