The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract [Paperback]

Bill James
4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
List Price: CDN$ 34.99
Price: CDN$ 21.94 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 13.05 (37%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Thursday, October 23? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition --  
Hardcover --  
Paperback CDN $21.94  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

June 13 2003 New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract
When Bill James published his original Historical Baseball Abstract in 1985, he produced an immediate classic, hailed by the Chicago Tribune as the "holy book of baseball." Now, baseball's beloved "Sultan of Stats" (The Boston Globe) is back with a fully revised and updated edition for the new millennium.
Like the original, The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract is really several books in one. The Game provides a century's worth of American baseball history, told one decade at a time, with energetic facts and figures about How, Where, and by Whom the game was played. In The Players, you'll find listings of the top 100 players at each position in the major leagues, along with James's signature stats-based ratings method called "Win Shares," a way of quantifying individual performance and calculating the offensive and defensive contributions of catchers, pitchers, infielders, and outfielders. And there's more: the Reference section covers Win Shares for each season and each player, and even offers a Win Share team comparison. A must-have for baseball fans and historians alike, The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract is as essential, entertaining, and enlightening as the sport itself.

Frequently Bought Together

The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract + Baseball Between the Numbers: Why Everything You Know About the Game Is Wrong + The Book: Playing the Percentages in Baseball
Price For All Three: CDN$ 55.88

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

A premier baseball analyst and brand name, James (The Bill James Player Ratings Book, The Bill James Guide to Baseball Managers) releases a revised edition of his 1985 classic, with expanded player and team histories and reconsidered commentary. Divided into two sections, "The Game" and "The Players," this comprehensive and opinionated tome describes the evolution of the sport over the decades (uniforms in the 1890s, best minor league teams of the 1930s, the Negro Leagues, etc.) and the characteristics of its players (stats, injuries, habits and proclivities). The thumbnail player sketches in the second section (the 100 greatest players at each position) vary widely in content and tone: the entry on Lefty Gomez includes a page on his public-speaking abilities, while of Kevin Brown, James merely writes, "I don't root for him, either, but he is a great pitcher." (James has assigned the rankings according to a statistical rating formula he calls Win Shares, which he explains conceptually and mathematically.) The game section, though, is the standout. It may not contain detailed statistical leaders or standings for each year, or even who won each World Series, but it does offer information on new stadiums, the competitiveness of different leagues and shifts in the way the game was played. At the end of each chapter, a "decade in a box" lists major statistics and Jamesian awards, varying from the quantitative (the team with the best record) and the qualitative (the best switch hitter) to the quirky (the decade's ugliest player). (Dec.)Forecast: There are enough baseball and Bill James fans to ensure steady sales, and the pub date near enough to the World Series might encourage a few extra readers. A uniquely personal, even iconoclastic guide, this belongs in baseball libraries to counterpoint The Baseball Encyclopedia and Total Baseball.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

True to form, James's new Historical Baseball Abstract is filled with often fascinating and frequently quirky evaluations and insights regarding the history of baseball. Starting with the 1870s, James explores, decade by decade, how and where the game was played and who played it. He discusses nicknames, top minor-league teams, and the most admirable superstars, among other matters. At the close of the initial 13 chapters, the author highlights each ten-year period "in a box," with a player or two tagged as the best-looking, the ugliest, the fastest, the slowest, and so forth. The last half of the book presents James's evaluations of the top 100 or more players at each position. Some are expected, with Lou Gehrig and Jimmie Foxx, for example, deemed the top first basemen. But Hank Greenberg is slotted in only at eighth place, and then James spends most of his time ragging on the great slugger's performance as the Cleveland Indians' general manager from 1949 to 1957. In other instances, the description of a player's on-field antics is melded with curious social commentary. All of this makes for a sometimes illuminating, occasionally exasperating book certain to engender controversy among baseball aficionados. For general libraries. R. C. Cottrell, California State Univ., Chico
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
The first section of this book looks at the history of baseball as it has unfolded, decade by decade, since 1870. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:


Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A must-have for lovers of sabermetrics.... Feb. 26 2003
Format:Hardcover
.... but not quite as ground-breaking as the original edition.
Overall, it is a definitive book to have on your baseball shelf. James rates many more players than he did in 1987 and introduces a new statistic called "Win Shares" from which most findings are based. I was disappointed with his explanation for wins shares theory and even more frustrated to learn that you had to buy the "Win Shares" companion piece [not cheap] just to understand his derivations. The preface/introduction in the historical abstract does not fully describe the intricacies of the method (particularly for defensive win shares), making it difficult to appreciate his conclusions. His finding that Craig Biggio is the 35th greatest player of all time, for example, is met with skepticism because the reader is not given complete proof. Yes, we know Biggio can create runs -- that is a Jamesian throwback -- but how precisely do these runs contribute to wins? The reader won't know all the details until he purchases the "Win Shares" volume.......
Some of James' conclusions arbitrarily deviate from the quantitative analyses. He goes to the trouble of developing a systematic approach for win shares but then does not do us the service of explaining why certain players rate higher than their individual values would indicate (see Don Mattingly). Such deviations do not lend confidence to a value scheme which Mr. James himself is VERY fond of.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Impressive Synthesis June 10 2004
Format:Paperback
I bought the original when it came out years ago, and read it, and read it, and read it until it's spine cracked and pages started falling out. This time I bought the hardcover edition (buy whatever edition you can get your hands on, and can afford) and have read it, and read it, and read it; but thanks to hardcover binding it is not falling apart. One of the most fun aspects of this version is seeing how James has used his Win Shares method of evaluating performance to rank players by position. (By the way, the book Win Shares is an absolute classic, and should be purchased with this book, if at all possible.) For example, if you were to look strictly at the numbers you may say that Ty Cobb or Tris Speaker (or even the Mick) was the greatest center fielder of them all; but armed with his Win Shares method he makes you seriously consider that it has to be Willie Mays. I certainly have no argument against James's evaluation, but with Win Shares there seems to be a more logical, statistical basis for that judgment than by comparing raw numbers (not that Willie Mays needs to apologize for anything; he did after all have some huge seasons while playing at Candlestick park. How would he have done, I wonder, playing the last half of his career in Atlanta?) If you are a baseball fan, young or old, buy this book and get a wonderful overview of baseball history.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars Impressive Synthesis April 23 2004
Format:Paperback
I bought the original when it came out years ago, and read it, and read it, and read it until it's spine cracked and pages started falling out. This time I bought the hardcover edition (buy whatever edition you can get your hands on, and can afford) and have read it, and read it, and read it; but thanks to hardcover binding it is not falling apart. One of the most fun aspects of this version is seeing how James has used his Win Shares method of evaluating performance to rank players by position. (By the way, the book Win Shares is an absolute classic, and should be purchased with this book, if at all possible.) For example, if you were to look strictly at the numbers you may say that Ty Cobb or Tris Speaker (or even the Mick) was the greatest center fielder of them all; but armed with his Win Shares method he makes you seriously consider that it has to be Willie Mays. I certainly have no argument against James's evaluation, but with Win Shares there seems to be a more logical, statistical basis for that judgment than by comparing raw numbers (not that Willie Mays needs to apologize for anything; he did after all have some huge seasons while playing at Candlestick park. How would he have done, I wonder, playing the last half of his career in Atlanta?) If you are a baseball fan, young or old, buy this book and get a wonderful overview of baseball history.
Was this review helpful to you?
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Original, Poor New Edition Jan. 28 2004
Format:Paperback
The original 2001 "New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract," which makes up the bulk of this 2003 edition, is a fantastic book, perhaps James' magnum opus. If someone said that no baseball library is complete without this book, he would be wrong. No baseball library is adequate without this book.
However, there is no reason for owners of the 2001 edition to consider buying the new edition. There's really nothing new here. Well, sure, James has added a few pages of new material, but it's not very good and it does not add anything substantive to any of the myriad topics raised in the book's 2001 text. Most of the genuinely new material consists of James' corrections. But the editors of the new edition have not actually made any of these corrections to the text itself. For example, James writes that he erred in saying that the 1914 A's had history's best infield, judged by Win Shares; a mathematical error led him to overlook the 1913 A's, whose infielders earned even more Win Shares. But page 548 still lists the 1914 A's as the Win Sharingest infield of all time.
Most infuriatingly of all, James casually mentions in this edition that all index references to pages after 945 were off by a page in the previous edition. But the new edition does not correct this error; the new index is just as wrong as it was in the old edition. So when you go to look up John Dopson, the index tells you to look on page 956. Only his name does not appear there; it appears on page 957.
Here, then, is something innovative: A reference book that cannot be referred to, and a new edition that mentions but does not correct errors in the previous edition.
All in all, this might be the sorriest excuse for a "new edition" in recent publishing history. Considered in the abstract, "The New Bill James Historical Abstract" deserves five stars. But considered as an updated edition of a classic, the 2003 version deserves no stars at all.
Was this review helpful to you?
Want to see more reviews on this item?
Most recent customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Lies and damned lies
Bill James has been cooking statistics to support his own prejudices for twenty years. Think about it. Read more
Published on June 10 2004 by antistat
5.0 out of 5 stars A must-have for any serious baseball fan
The Historical Baseball Abstract is one of the most important books ever written about baseball. It covers the history of the Major Leagues in a very enlightening and entertaining... Read more
Published on Dec 10 2003 by Jeffrey Lichtman
4.0 out of 5 stars Great...but Not for the Casual Fan
I like this book, but I must caustion the prospective buyer that Bill James is an acquired taste, even for fans of advanced baseball statistics. Read more
Published on Aug. 17 2003
5.0 out of 5 stars Stat-Heads Everywhere, Rejoice!
This latest edition shows James at his finest, in the form of numerous essays and thoughts about the game, ranging from the "history" he provides of the game from the... Read more
Published on Aug. 8 2003 by Todd Hawley
4.0 out of 5 stars Good
This was good, but maybe not as good as I expected. As noted by Michael Lewis in "Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game", Bill James has been the unsung hero of a... Read more
Published on July 17 2003 by Randy Given
5.0 out of 5 stars Feel like staying up all night?
One of my friends who lives two blocks from Wrigley Field but (inexplicably) does not give a hoot about baseball once commented to me, "I can't stand baseball fans. Read more
Published on July 10 2003 by P. Cook
5.0 out of 5 stars The best!
This is by far the most authoritative, informative and entertaining baseball guide around. It is not, however, objective and Bill James does not keep his likes and dislikes well... Read more
Published on June 3 2003 by Lisa Bahrami
5.0 out of 5 stars For every baseball fan
How can you not like this book?
Bill James is a stat-head. You already know that. And if this were simply a compilation of obscure stats -- many made up by James himself --... Read more
Published on May 13 2003 by Marc Davis
4.0 out of 5 stars Too Technical
James has bias. He loves Mantle and has figured out a way to elevate him in his rankings. He dislikes Nolan Ryan and tries to show why Ryan should not be ranked higher. Read more
Published on May 12 2003 by Barry Baldini
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback