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Bitter Bitch Paperback – Jan 27 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Constable (Jan. 27 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849012687
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849012683
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 1.7 x 21.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 259 g

Product Description

Review

This is one of the books that really gets at you. And it is entertaining. (...) It is not just a polemic, not just divisive, not narrow-minded. After Bitterfittan the discussions round the dinner table can do more for equality than all the extremist speeches in the world. -- Mattias Bergman Expressen The book's strength lies in Maria Sveland's honesty and conviction - her anger, sorrow, powerlessness and rebelliousness reach out to us in a way that feels absolutely genuine. -- Paulina Helgeson Svenska Dagbladet There should be a law demanding that all parents-to-be must read this book. -- Moa Eriksson Hallandsposten If Maria Sveland's very first book isn't among the paperback bestsellers within six months, then I'll be surprised. Because here there is something sweet and something salty for everyone. -- Agneta Rosendal Nerikes Allehanda --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Maria Sveland was born in Sweden in 1974. She graduated from Dramatiska Institutet (University College of Film, Radio, Television and Theatre) in 2000 and has since made a number of acclaimed programmes for Swedish public radio and television. Bitter Bitch is her first novel.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 9 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Introspective approach to society's undiscussables Sept. 5 2011
By C R Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Sara, the protagonist narrator, takes us on an introspective journey into her current state of mind through her present observations and memories of her past. She has taken leave of her husband and toddler son (and January in Stockholm) to get away for a week and collect herself. The author deftly brings us back and forth between Sara's present state and her childhood/young adulthood. In a very readable story, the author addresses many of our modern society's undiscussable realities: that women aren't as happy and equal as many pretend to be or convince themselves that they are. She also raises some of society's darker undercurrents (alcoholism/divorce/sexual assault) in the context of a real life without being gruesome or titillating and without making them stereotypical or tidy. Throughout the story, she interweaves quotes from Erica Jong's Fear of Flying as a backdrop to Sara's reflection on how things have (or haven't) changed in over 30 years of feminism.

So many of her observations captured my thoughts and feelings about today's society and its expectations, especially of women. Her views are so similar to mine, yet so taboo--at least here in the US where every woman is expected to want/have/love children in this happy happy (and unreal) place. At times, I found myself laughing at the author's insightfulness about topics I wouldn't discuss with my best girlfriends for fear of offending them with my opinions.

I'm afraid that what I've written doesn't do the book justice or serve it well, but I thoroughly enjoyed it and would highly recommend it to anyone who likes books a little deeper than the more common "Women's Fiction" pablum.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Food for thought-a thought provoking read Nov. 7 2011
By S.Kar - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Bitter bitch; translated from Swedish to English, is written by Maria Sveland, a journalist and feminist about her experience of motherhood. Recently, a new mother myself, I read this book with great interest. Beautifully interspersed with poignant memoirs from her childhood, in which lie the foundation for her theme about the inherent challenge to female self-worth, Sveland starts her story when she escapes on a week-long holiday by herself leaving her husband and son behind. But she is so brimming with rage and bitterness that at the start of the story, she agitates, alienates, even annoys with her aggression. Perhaps the clunky English from the translation does not help? But then her intelligence and the brutally honest questions started to resonate, and I ended up wanting to recommend it to all my friends, male or female who have recently become parents. I have even re-read this book again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Insightful Sept. 7 2011
By MSW - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This author has great insights and sees so much of what is strange and awkward about gender power dynamics in families and work places. I love her honesty and unabashed sharing of what she sees. I haven't read such a clearly written hard hitting book in decades - and I read hundreds of books a year - and felt a thrill of recognition at the turn of every page. Well worth reading!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Best Book For Bitter Bitches Jan. 3 2013
By M. Archer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I am a product of being a teen in the early 70's, so much hope for all of us, but as we progressed into the 80's our independence and respect for our needs and wants were overtaken by the media referring to us a manly, non domestic, lesbians, unable to even understand any complex thoughts. I was so high on being a women with options in the 70's I got an engineering degree. Talk about a "minority" fill job, they want you mainly to fill their diversity needs, not much chance of moving up too far and oh my! when I did get married and have a child my salary was cut because I'd been out of the workforce for 3 months. I was encouraged to just "stay home with my child". Life has turned out just as s**^^y for over achieving women as this author writes about. You have to be a woman to understand I guess. Highly recommended. I too am a Bitter Bitch!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Not easy to be a mom May 1 2012
By Laura A. Wideburg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book takes up the challenges that face young mothers when a career is on hold and time for yourself becomes rare and fleeting. The author expresses many emotions that women feel but keep to themselves. The feeling of being abandoned can be extremely strong in that first year. Although I often dreamed of escaping for some time to reflect during my first year as a mom, I wasn't able to do so. The novel's main character, Sara, takes such a trip as an escape and reflects over the difficulties of real female equality in a relationship undergoing the radical shift of the first child. At times, the main character appears a bit whiny, however, but she is honest. I read this book as part of a book club and noticed that the older generation was much more condemning of the audacity of the main character to be so "selfish" as to leave her child with her husband for one week. The husband has been leaving the child for weeks at a time! Younger women today do not have the surrounding community of stay-at-home moms that my mother's generation had -- and the dream of just getting some sleep reflects the reality that working people are not as available for their families as they'd been in the past. A good read with much to think about.

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