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Black Hawk Down Soundtrack


Price: CDN$ 16.48 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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27 new from CDN$ 6.64 11 used from CDN$ 5.52

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Jan. 22 2002)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • Run Time: 144 minutes
  • ASIN: B00005UWHH
  • In-Print Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #9,352 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Hunger
2. Barra Barra - Rachid Taha
3. Vale Of Plenty
4. Chant
5. Still
6. Mogadishu Blues
7. Synchrotone
8. Bakara
9. Of The Earth
10. Ashes To Ashes
11. Gortoz A Ran-J'Attends - Danez Prigent & Lisa Gerrard
12. Tribal War
13. Leave No Man Behind
14. Minstrel Boy (film version) - Joe Strummer & The Mescaleros
15. Still Reprise

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Audio CD
This is composer Hans Zimmer's fifth collaboration with director Ridley Scott. The chaos of war and the bond of soldiers caught up in war is the subject of the music. I purchased it today and after listening to it cover to cover I came to the conclusion that no one's ever done a score like Black Hawk Down. Hans Zimmer has proved himself, in my opinion, to be a great composer who infuses modern sensibilities to his creative mix of energetic, nightmarish, sad, emotional, and inpiring music. One of the best scores I've ever heard. This music has made me want to see the film. I've also recently purchased the novel Black Hawk Down by Mark Bowden but haven't come around to read it yet.
The soundtrack's great mix of innovative music includes:
1. Hunger
2. Barra Barra (Performed by Rachid Taha)
3. Vale of Plenty
4. Chant
5. Still
6. Mogadishu Blues
7. Synchrotone
8. Bakara
9. Of the Earth
10. Ashes to Ashes
11. Gortoz A Ran - J'attends (Performed by Denez Prigent & Lisa
Gerrard
12. Tribal War
13. Leave No Man Behind
14. Minstrel Boy (Performed by Joe Strummer and The Mescaleroes)
15. Still Reprise
I highly reccomend this soundtrack album to anyone . It is a great addition to any album collection, and is worth the purchase price. I have also now become a fan Hans Zimmer's scores, and have added the Gladiator soundtrack to my collection, being one of Hans Zimmer's compostions. Distributed by Decca Records and UMG Soundtracks.
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Format: Audio CD
I defy anyone to listen to Rcahid Taha's "Barra Barra" and not immediately be transported back to the streets of the capital of Somalia as you saw it in the movie.

The whole soundtrack is great background music as it's like those old soundtracks where they actually put the "music" on the albums rather than "songs."
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Format: Audio CD
This sountrack by Hans Zimmer is terrific. I don't believe you can watch the film and not leave the theater without the music in your head. Ethnic, violent, hanunting and tragic all at the same time it continues to bring to life the tragedy of the film with each listen. A powerful ride and well worth the purchase!
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By A Customer on May 30 2004
Format: Audio CD
The thing that made me buy this cd was the movie.AfterI bought the movie and wached it the music inspired me to get the cd and its great.
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By Jason Farcone on May 14 2004
Format: Audio CD
I've been a fan of Hans Zimmer since day one; in fact, his score for Crimson Tide back when I was a small youngin' was the first soundtrack I ever purchased.
His score for Black Hawk Down is, yes, ecclectic. Yet, I find myself dismissing much of the album, in fact, ALL of the album -- despite it being fresh, original, and exciting -- because track 11, "Gortoz a Ran", performed by Danez Prigent and Lisa Gerrard, is one of THE most haunting pieces of music I have ever heard...
I'm a music lover and have a wide variety of tastes. Hell, I'm a film music fantatic (or at least at one point). That being said, few pieces of music, individually, evoke so much emotion out of me. I'm a very analytical person. One rendition of "Gortoz" and I'm near in tears. It just brings out whatever grief or sorrow I have in myself, unlike any other piece of music. It makes me grieve on a small, personal scale, and for Humanity as a whole, and the suffering and injustices we endure. And yet, the lyrics are anonymous. It doesn't matter. It's pure tone, pure mood... It is a Religious piece of music. It can put one immediately into a state of compassionate meditation. It melts the heart.
The saddest thing is the track stands out as being so spectacular -- above the rest, really -- and the rest of the album is still of the utmost quality. It's Zimmer experimenting and creating a clever and intriguing musical landscape, with a longing, mournful theme, and as other reviewers have stated, several other stylings. All in all, it's very, very good, one of Zimmer's best, in fact (right behind his best effort, The Thin Red Line, another war effort)....
And yet, I always come back to "Gortoz"..........
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Format: Audio CD
When I first watched the movie, I noticed the music immediately and it captured my interest throughout the entire film. It was a mix of rock, synthesizers, classical, and traditional African music that formed a style unlike any I'd heard before. Haunting dirges described a famine stricken land, Islamic themes seemed to echo out from centuries past, and intense traditional music at a fast beat backed with rock guitars would heighten tension in fight scenes. In most movies, the soundtrack is a sickly background presence, but in Black Hawk Down, it's up front, making all the action larger than life.
I find that this unique music does well on its own or under any circumstance. It just is wonderfully powerful music that gets the heart going.
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By V. Clancy on April 15 2004
Format: Audio CD
The last musical score that impressed me was Dr. Zhivago. Zimmer's score on this one leaves haunting strains which keep coming back-more from Thomas Moore's(Strummer really does great)piece done at the end of the movie.
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Format: Audio CD
The soundtrack to "Black Hawk Down" (a good movie in it's own right) offers up a change from the usual soundtrack, although fans of Hans Zimmer may find nothing new.
The booklet for the CD describes that the intention in the soundtrack was to combine "traditional" and "modern" instruments. The traditional instruments represented the Somalis, while the modern instruments represented the Americans. What you get is perhaps best heard in "Barra Barra" - which I can only describe as Arab rock. The track "Tribal War" reminds me of a time in music when composers looked to ancient tribal drums to add a flavor of primitive culture in their music. There are also some stringed instrument sections mixed in with Middle East vocals. It's all very "Gladiator"-like, but with a contemporary touch. That makes the soundtrack unique in it's own right.
I also have to compliment the rendition of "Minstral Boy." I love it, and it's probably my favorite version of it next to John McDermott's rendition.
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