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Blazing Angels Squadrons of WWII

by Ubisoft
Nintendo Wii
 Teen
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Game Information

  • Platform:   Nintendo Wii
  • ESRB Rating: Teen Teen
  • Media: Video Game
  • Item Quantity: 1

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Product Description

Blazing Angels: Squadrons of WWII [CD-ROM] [Nintendo Wii] For the unknown

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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A "blazing" good time Jan. 13 2010
By LeBrain HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER
Fun: 4.0 out of 5 stars   
I am very much enjoying Blazing Angels for the Wii. The great thing about the Wii is the use of the Wiimote as a controller. You can configure the controls a number of different ways, but I like using the nunchuck as the control stick. The controls are simple once you get the hang of it. You have the control stick which is very intiutive. You have throttle and brake. You have one control to give orders to your wingmen, and to keep things simple there are only three orders: fly in formation, cover me, and attack. However, in addition to this, as you go forward in the game you gain specialized wingmen. With another very simple control, you can tell one guy to help you repair damage to your plane, tell another guy to get an enemy off your tail, and tell another guy to attack a target.

The setting is WWII and you will fly in several theaters. The European front is yours, as is the Pacific and Africa. The missions vary, they can be ground attack, air attack, surveillance, and so on. As you progress, you will gain more aircraft to fly, including Japanese planes. I have not unlocked everything, but I sure hope I get to fly an ME262 by the end. (I know there's an ME262 in Blazing Angels 2.)

I'm enjoying this game a lot. I'm just getting into it now, and it's very easy to pick up. There's a training mission to start you off, and new controls are never introduced without some warm up time.

Cool game. Grab it for the Wii. 4 stars.
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5.0 out of 5 stars BLAZING ANGELS SQUADRONS OF WWII Jan. 22 2013
Verified Purchase
Another good game from Wii. Good flying techniques.. Color good. I can't say anything bad about it right at this moment.
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4.0 out of 5 stars For non-pros of the video games Feb. 28 2011
By PRich
Fun: 4.0 out of 5 stars   
I don not play video games such as X-Box or Ps3.

I found B Angels to be easy to learn (though the instructions are not very numerous.

Only one drawback, you have to finish a level (haven't found a way to save one)and the difficult part is always the last, Of course. And the commentaries of your wingmen or commanders are repetitious (you can turn them off but if you want a realistic view...)

I have found myself playing for one hour without even noticing ( though my fingers were sore form gripping; ah the stress of the dogfight)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.7 out of 5 stars  115 reviews
126 of 131 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It is fun to shoot down Nazis. April 23 2007
By Luke Meyers - Published on Amazon.com
Fun: 5.0 out of 5 stars   
I got this game a week or two ago and wanted to share my endorsement of it. I have very fond memories of Sierra's Red Baron games on the PC and Mac, and the WWII dogfighting action of Blazing Angels strikes the same chord. I haven't gotten terrifically far in the missions -- 5 or so -- but with one exception (the sandstorm level, which is apparently the worst of the bunch by far based on forum posters' complaints) they're fun and present a good amount of challenge.

There are several non-campaign modes. One-on-one dogfights with an "ace" flying the same plane (chosen from all those you've unlocked) pit you against a fairly tough opponent. I've found the difficulty to depend a lot on the kind of plane, though -- the ace dogfight for the very first plane is pretty tough because the weapons are underpowered, but I had other fights that were over in the first 15 seconds. There's an "arcade" mode that pits you against waves of less-challenging opponents. And then there are little "mini-campaigns" which are like one-off versions of the campaign missions (haven't tried them yet).

Then there's multiplayer. I was initially annoyed because I read on Amazon that you could play with up to 16 players online, but there's no mention of this in the game or on the box. From what I've read, Nintendo is starting up its online play service in June, with a Pokemon title as the big launch hoohah, so hopefully Blazing Angels will be updated at that point for online play. Without online, there's still very satisfying 2-player split-screen play, both versus and co-op.

Now, the question for all Wii titles -- how are the controls?

Basically, I like them a lot. Several control schemes are available, and they vary along a couple of axes. First, you've got the choice between arcade-style and simulation-style. Arcade-style makes it sort of simpler to turn, but you can't do barrel rolls; I strongly recommend using simulation and never looking back. There are several different control configurations. There's a single-controller config (no nunchuck), a "classic" config (with nunchuck) which doesn't use motion sensitivity, and the default style which uses both controllers and tilt sensitivity for pitch and roll. You can have the tilt sensitivity on either the remote or the nunchuck (I think the default was the nunchuck, but I liked the remote more).

I did most of my initial play with the wiimote-sensitive version of the default scheme. I really like the feel of turning the remote around in the air to control the plane. Takes some getting used to, but there's a nice nimble feel to it once you do. However, there were certain things that really nagged at me about this control scheme. In particular, the targeting controls are very poorly placed. The analog stick on the nunchuck is used for throttle (up and down), but left and right on the same stick are used to select targets. This is a horrible thing because you're constantly using the throttle during fights, and it's extremely easy to let the stick slip to the side and lose your target. Holding the A button makes the camera track your current target, which makes fighting a *lot* easier, but this advantage is lost if you're constantly switching targets.

Fortunately, it turns out that the dark horse -- the single controller with no nunchuck -- is a vastly superior control configuration. I wound up trying this during multiplayer and can confidently say I'll never switch back. It has the same basic flight feel as the default -- better, actually; there's something very natural about holding a horizontal controller and tilting it around, sort of Excite Truck style, in the way that one might when getting a little excited about a game with no motion sensor controllers at all. The big advantage, though, is that the less-commonly-used functions are out of the way. The B button

(trigger) is used as a shift button to enable these lesser-used functions. It just works a whole lot better, and you don't have to fuss with the nunchuck -- love it!

So... yeah. Fun game if you like flying around and shooting down Nazis.

And who doesn't?
58 of 64 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I have mixed feelings about this one June 27 2007
By bixodoido - Published on Amazon.com
Fun: 3.0 out of 5 stars   
in Blazing Angels you play the part of a WWII pilot and guide him through his war experience, through training and in several missions in key battles during the war. While the game makes innovative use of the Wii's control system, the game falls short in graphics and lacks a real addictive element to draw in the average gamer.

Audience: I thought, with the Wii's control system, that this game would be a blast for anyone, but I was at least partially mistaken. I'm not a flight sim fan, and it turns out the game couldn't really capture my attention for very long despite the cool control setup. This game would probably appeal to WWII fans and/or fans of flight games, but its appeal outside those demographics is limited.

Graphics: Definitely a shortfall here. I don't expect stellar graphics from the Wii, but I had a difficult time even identifying ground targets at times. I guess the red boxes that outlined my targets were supposed to make up for that...

Gameplay: The missions I played (and I didn't get all the way through the game) were pretty standard for this type of game--escort something, blow up a convoy, protect a bridge, etc.

Control: This is the game's strong point for sure. There are several control options, which let you choose between using the motion sensor capability on the Wiimote or the nunchuck and give you a wide variety of other options for controlling your craft.

Challenge: Some parts of the campaign are really challenging. There is also a single player dogfight mode that offers a wide range of difficulty.

Storyline: The campaign storyline was enjoyable, and the scenes in between fights were well done.

Overall this is a...well, an adequate game. Despite the game's excellent use of the Wii's controls there was nothing in the game that really made me want to continue playing it. If you're into WWII games or flight sim games I'd definitely recommend giving this one a shot--if not it may be just worth a rental.
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Graaak gak gakcak..... May 16 2007
By P. Webb - Published on Amazon.com
Fun: 5.0 out of 5 stars   
What Blazing Angels for the WII does right far outweighs the few downsides. Capturing the thrill of flight and the adrenaline rush of dogfighting the controls are EASY to pick up initially (I like the Nunchuck sensitive arcade control in my right hand with the wii mote laying on my leg like a control panel. This leaves all the primary plane controls (pitch, angel, acceleration, both weapons)in one hand and it just feels right to me, the downside of this control scheme is that you need to use your other hand to make formation adjustments and camera changes, but I find it works great. Gameplay is fun with the standard issue WWII action and dialogue and the SFX are terrific in this game as you unlock more powerful planes and guns. The game has a great amount of unlockable content, and is the perfect combination between aracade and sim. Many experienced fliers might find the options a little thin eventually. There doesn't appear to be any online (yet?) so don't buy it for that. Recommended heartily.
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Bottom Line Feb. 22 2009
By Johnny Rocket - Published on Amazon.com
Fun: 4.0 out of 5 stars   
The bottom line is, for Wii and for $20, this game is pretty fun, especially if you like flight sims or World War 2. Will you be amazed by the graphics, no. Are the flight controls fun, absolutley. The story line is long, probably 15 or so missions, with some being quite challenging, especially landing a broken aircraft. Don't worry about what this game isn't and enjoy it for what it is.
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very fun, and Wii-mote makes it even better May 5 2007
By Patterson Edward - Published on Amazon.com
Fun: 4.0 out of 5 stars   
When the Wii was first announced to have motion sensitive controllers I like many people anticipated that this would translate well to flight simulators. It's true. The game has many different controller modes that you can choose. You can use only the remote, the joystick on the nunchuck, and my favorite the motion sensitivity of the nunchuck which makes it feel like you're using a joystick to fly.

The game is fun, the graphics aren't the best but I think that Wii is showing the games derive more of their quality and fun from game play rather then detailed graphics. You fight in about 8 different battles with your choice of many different planes. My only major complaint is that it's such a short game in terms of the campaign. The 8 missions will likely take you less than an hour per mission.

However, there are multi-player and single-player challenges. It's a war game but not really too graphic for children. I'd recommend it for anyone over the age of 13. Overall its fun, just a little short for my taste but it seems that all World War 2 games seem to suffer from that weakness.
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