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Blind Man of Seville Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007117809
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007117802
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.5 x 4.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 612 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,177,896 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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First Sentence
It had started the moment he'd walked into that room and had seen that face. Read the first page
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By charles falk on April 16 2003
Format: Hardcover
THE BLIND MAN OF SEVILLE is a tour de force. Robert Wilson melds police procedural with psychological thriller as he leads the reader through the social, geographic, and historic topography of Seville and Tangier. Along the way Wilson offers insights into the vagaries of memory, the discomforts of truth, and the origins of loneliness.
Seville's chief homicide detective Javier Falcon, son of a famous painter, struggles to identify a killer who mutilates his victims while showing them unendurable images from their past. At the same time Falcon is wrestling with ghosts of his own past: his divorce and the contents of his dead father's studio which he's kept locked away for nearly two years. What he learns in these simultaneous investigations brings Falcon to verge of collapse.
This may not be a book for readers who want their mysteries to be simple mind candy. It is dark, violent, and frightening. However, if you admire the dark stories of Ruth Rendel and Nicolas Freeling, you should read THE BLIND MAN OF SEVILLE.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dale F. Powers on Nov. 8 2003
Format: Hardcover
The telling of the story draws you into the mind of Javier Falcon, police detective. As he is compelled to follow the path of his choice you are drawn along with him. The plot takes many disturbing twists but that is what makes it a must read. Obsession takes many forms in this story - human weaknesses that are nurtured by those with their own flaws for their own benefit.
The book can and will be unsettling, not because it is gory, but it is disturbing where the minds of the characters take you.
This book easily moved into my top 10.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Toni Osborne TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 24 2008
Format: Paperback
Javier Falcon book 1

Inspector Jefe Falcon is called to the home of Raul Jimenez, a successful and politically influential man in his 70s --- he had been tortured until he died of heart failure. The eyelids have been cut from the mutilated body by his killer so that he cannot avoid the images playing on his TV screen, this, triggers a reaction in Falcon that is something more than horror. The primary suspect at the outset is the widow, Dona Consuelo Jimenez. But the widow is certainly not the only suspect, perhaps the murderer came out of Raul's distant past.

Falcon is tormented by this murder, more than any other crime, as the case proceeds it strikes fear into his heart...what twisted mind could have committed such a gruesome act. During the investigation, he sees a link to his family, curious he consults his father's journals revealing a dark past....

The pace in this book heightens when the journals are introduced and becomes a nail bitter as details are revealed. The author masterfully describes physical sensations: sights, smells and feelings are accomplished in a profound and disturbing way. Unfortunately, this novel includes a hefty dose of words and phrases from another language, a distraction that takes adjustment, a glossary or translation would have helped with the flow of the story. The author exploits fear to its maximum with fascinating exchanges between characters wanting to forget their painful memories and associations. The most lovable character is Falcon, he is breathtakingly lifelike.

This is a brilliant psychological thriller, an intellectual as well as frightening experience, one that draws you deeply into the subconscious texture of the plot. A wonderful read....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By RachelWalker on April 3 2003
Format: Hardcover
This, the new novel by the award-winning author of A Small Death in Lisbon, appears to have much going for it. The first draw is its rather curious title, the second is its exotic setting, Seville, Spain. Plus, the plot itself sounds rather fascinating...
Thursday 12th of April, and a leading restaurateur is found slain in his home. Tied to a chair in front his TV, he has been forced to view horrifically unendurable images. The horrors of these scenes is evidenced by the self-inflicted wounds caused by Raul Jimenez's desperate struggle not to watch them. On top of that, his eyelids have been removed. The normally dispassionate detective Javier Falcon is shocked deeply, and becomes inexplicably frightened by this killer who seems to have know, intimately, every single detail of his victim's life. Never in his career has he confronted a scene so barbaric.
But, for Javier Falcon, the worst is yet to come. Because, in investigating the victim's complex past, he discovers that it is inextricably connected with that of his own father, world-famous artist Francisco Falcon. The case eventually becomes not just a hunt for a killer clearly prepared to strike again, but a voyage of discovery for Falcon as he, through Francisco's journals, learns much about his father's past and the dark secrets it hides...
This story, told through the dual narratives of fascinating diary extracts and standard third-person narration, is told expertly. Even though the first hundred pages or so grow slightly dull at times, and it takes a while to settle all the numerous characters in your mind, the pace soon picks up as we learn that the case has as much to do with the past as it does the present. The setting is described wonderfully, and the city of Seville is really brought to life, shimmering with vitality.
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By Robert Busko on Feb. 26 2003
Format: Hardcover
The Blind Man of Seville is my first Robert Wilson book, but it won't be my last. Written in a manner that is engaging and just a little poetic, The Blind Man of Seville is filled with wonderful characters in a great setting.
Detective Javier Falcon, Chief Inspector of the Seville Homicide Department is called to investigate the murder of a well known restaurateur Raul Jiminez. Falcon not only struggles with the brutality of the murder, but also the meticulous manner in which the killer planned and stalked his prey. Falcon very quickly discovers that he is dealing with a brilliant psychopath. Ultimately, his investigation begins to touch his own past. In some ways, and with obvious differences, The Blind Man of Seville reminds me of Jeffery Deaver's The Bone Collector because of the way the killer plays with the police. However, the treatment of children in this story is disturbing....nuf said.
If there is a weakness to this book, and it is a small one, it would be the referrals to the long lost journal kept by Falcon's father. The constant break in the ebb and flow of the first story is distracting.
I am looking forward to the release of Instruments of Darkness, Wilson's next scheduled book for U. S. readers.
This is a worthy book and deserving of your attention.
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