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Blinking Lights And Other Revelations


Price: CDN$ 18.09 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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16 new from CDN$ 12.16 6 used from CDN$ 1.46

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 26 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Universal Music Group
  • ASIN: B0007Y8AMO
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #38,691 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. Theme From Blinking Lights
2. From Which I Came/ A Magic World
3. Son Of A Bitch
4. Blinking Lights (For Me)
5. Trouble With Dreams
6. Marie Floating Over The Backyard
7. Suicide Life
8. InThe Yard, Behind The Church
9. Railroad Man
10. The Other Shoe
See all 17 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. Dust Of Ages
2. Old Shit/ New Shit
3. Bride Of Theme From Blinking Lights
4. Hey Man (Now You're Really Living)
5. I'm Going To Stop Pretending That I Didn't Break Your Heart
6. To Lick Your Boots
7. If You See Natalie
8. Sweet Li'l Thing
9. Dusk: A Peach In The Orchard
10. Whatever Happened To Soy Bomb
See all 16 tracks on this disc

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Most helpful customer reviews

By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWER on April 26 2005
Format: Audio CD
It was Van Gogh who said that one must suffer for art. If that is true, then the loss of several family members explains how the Eels turned out an album like "Blinking Lights and Other Revelations." Their sixth album breaks away from their past work, into a two-disc album saturated with death, God, questions and desolate grandeur.

"Blinking Lights and Other Revelations" has been worked on, on and off, throughout the past decade, which makes it a bit uneven in places. Every band grows and changes, and so do the songs included here. But after a quiet, twinkly intro, the Eels launch into expansive folk-rock, country, explosive rock'n'roll, hallucinogenic music-box music, delicate piano pop, and melancholy songs dripping with whiskey and depression.

The first disc is a hodgepodge of styles, veering without rhyme or reason from one style to another. The second is a bit softer and milder -- despite the odd rock song like "Losing Streak," it relies more heavily on the poignant acoustic tunes, bits of experimental music, and delicate piano tunes.

Mark "E" Everett's voice has been worn to a croak in places, but he can still emote with the best of them."The stars shine in the sky tonight/like a path beyond the grave/when you wish upon that star/there's two of us you need to see," he sings mournfully over piano and swelling strings. He sounds tired and a bit croaky, but he pulls through on most songs.

There's no such unsteadiness in the Eels' music -- in fact, they sound more confident than ever before. It's rooted in guitar, drums and other typical rock instruments. But the Eels have spiced it up with piano, strings, eerie sound effects, bells, electric organ, xylophone and creaking hinges. Yes, creaking hinges -- at least that's what it sounds like.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 82 reviews
70 of 81 people found the following review helpful
Tales of Vulnerability, Candor and Courage April 30 2005
By Juan Mobili - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
A number of reviews that precede mine have already addressed how "Blinking Lights..." compares and rates within Eels discography, so I will not even attempt to do that, since I could not do it better nor offer much of a different opinion.
What I do want to share here, because the power of its music took me there without much of a choice on my part, is how this album stands so firmly and beautifully on its own, and it takes Eels music even farther that it has managed to go so far.
You've probably read already about Eels' "E" Everett's tragic family losses -her mother and sister dying within a short frame of time several years ago, her sibling by committing suicide- and about this double album being a diary of sorts of his coming to terms with these events, written and worked on for close to seven years.
I assume that some people -whether out of empathy, solidarity or morbid curiosity- may have been attracted to this music given reports of his mental fragility and their love for this man's music. In my case -nothing I'm necessarily proud of- when it comes to any art form, the artist's life is secondary: neither something I believe to predict the beauty or value of their work, nor a guarantee of depth because their subject is apparently serious.
Bottom line, I want to hear someone who can say something ... anything -that although very personal- has the capacity to be relevant to my life and help me learn something about the world that I was too busy or too dense to have noticed by myself. In other words, I don't want to read someone else's "journal" but make more sense of mine.
This is where Everett has succeeded so much. Whether you've been through similar or so much grief as he has or not, this music is going to educate your heart and bless you with some of the most moving songs you may hear all year.
As he sings on "The Trouble With Dreams," "the problem with dreams is that you never know / when to hold and when to let go," yet Everett chose, perhaps, the hardest path: to take on every dream and find out which ones keep close and which ones he was ready to say goodbye to.
In that sense, these songs, at times, may be somber but not depressing. There's no wallowing in pain but a diary of personal healing. Honest and sad, hopeful and tender, Eels' songs make his experience matter to anyone human and willing enough to hop on for the ride.
Musically, you can expect the depth and variety he's already shown in past albums: hushed folk confessions, gorgeous pop moments, timely strings and disturbing passages. All in all, this is further proof of Everett's impressive musical breadth and remarkable depth of feeling.
Even if you are a long time fan of Eels, "Blinking Lights ..." is bound to hold surprises for you. If not new sounds perhaps, there will certainly be special moments, where the vulnerability, candor and courage of these songs will take you over, and leave you seeing with new eyes.
20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
Honesty from Eels July 9 2005
By C. Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I have been on the fence about Eels for many years. The raspy voice of frontman Mark Everett has kept me from buying their albums. I was torn, because I think the songwriting has been quite good, but I can only take so much of his harsh vocals.

Everything changed for me with the release of "Blinking Lights and Other Revelations." The stark and honest material is complemented by Everett's emotive singing. The listener joins Everett through his melancholy journey through life. The trip is broken up with several "rest stops" with reprises of the "Blinking Lights Theme," always presented in a slightly different form. This helps the double disc album hold together as one cohesive piece of work.

Their current sound reminds me a lot of older Wilco, alt.-country/folk/pop, hard to categorize. Everett is like Bob Dylan without the metaphors, his feelings are presented in a plain and concise manner. I don't mean to imply that it's simplistic stuff, just not flowery.

This album is the uncorking of raw emotion without any trace of pretense. Although the band experiments with many unusual timbres, the album does not feel over-produced or self-indulgent. Could this have been cut down to one fantastic disc? Sure. But the passing of time is an important part of the experience. Plug your headphones into your stereo or iPod and take this trip with Eels. It's worth it.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
This is the Eels' real electro-shocker! May 15 2005
By Davey Jones - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Boring songs? No good rock and roll? I don't know what some of these reviewers are thinking. I nearly flipped when I heard the infectuous energy of Losing Streak and the startling power of The Other Shoe. Which isn't even to mention the enthralling Old Sh**/New SH** and irresistible Hey Man... It's true that the majority of this double album's songs are "slow" numbers. They are beautiful, heartfelt, well-crafted songs which contrast with the handful of bang-up stunners. Yes, it's still very much "Eels music". But give the slower songs some repeated listens, they'll grow on you quickly. No, it's not perfect...some of the songs are forgettable, and like most four-star double-disc epics, it could be whittled down into a one-cd marvel. Still, there's no excuse for ignoring these Blinking Lights.
15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Bright "Lights" April 27 2005
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It was Van Gogh who said that one must suffer for art. If that is true, then the loss of several family members explains how the Eels turned out an album like "Blinking Lights and Other Revelations." Their sixth album breaks away from their past work, into a two-disc album saturated with death, God, questions and desolate grandeur.

"Blinking Lights and Other Revelations" has been worked on, on and off, throughout the past decade, which makes it a bit uneven in places. Every band grows and changes, and so do the songs included here. But after a quiet, twinkly intro, the Eels launch into expansive folk-rock, country, explosive rock'n'roll, hallucinogenic music-box music, delicate piano pop, and melancholy songs dripping with whiskey and depression.

The first disc is a hodgepodge of styles, veering without rhyme or reason from one style to another. The second is a bit softer and milder -- despite the odd rock song like "Losing Streak," it relies more heavily on the poignant acoustic tunes, bits of experimental music, and delicate piano tunes.

Mark "E" Everett's voice has been worn to a croak in places, but he can still emote with the best of them."The stars shine in the sky tonight/like a path beyond the grave/when you wish upon that star/there's two of us you need to see," he sings mournfully over piano and swelling strings. He sounds tired and a bit croaky, but he pulls through on most songs.

There's no such unsteadiness in the Eels' music -- in fact, they sound more confident than ever before. It's rooted in guitar, drums and other typical rock instruments. But the Eels have spiced it up with piano, strings, eerie sound effects, bells, electric organ, xylophone and creaking hinges. Yes, creaking hinges -- at least that's what it sounds like.

But in virtually every album, there's a flaw, and there is here too. "Blinking Lights and Other Revelations" is a bit too big for its own good -- E lets his eccentric tastes run wild, and the result has no continuity. On the second disc, for example, there's a stretch of quiet songs interrupted by an uptempo rocker. And it could have used a little pruning here and there, with one or two songs that don't measure up, and could have been clipped out with no harm to the overall album.

Despite being a bit too big for its own good, "Blinking Lights and Other Revelations" is a slow, unsteady, beautifully overblown experience, a little bit wacky and a lot poignant.
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5 April 28 2005
By Nathan James - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
This album is brilliant. I bought it on a whim yesterday, seeing it on sale. It is gorgeous. Hold onto those heart strings. This little monster is going at them with everything it has.

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