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Blood in the Streets: Investment Profits in a World Gone Mad [Hardcover]

James Dale Davidson , William Rees-Mogg
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

June 1987
Reminiscent of the bestselling The Great Depression of 1990, Blood in the Streets is a groundbreaking book that offers a bold new approach to crisis investment and shows readers how to reap investment profits during financially uncertain times. HC: Simon & Schuster.
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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From Library Journal

"In unseen ways that most investors never suspect, the performance of markets is inevitably affected by megapolitical change on the global stage." These changes, according to the authors (publishers of the newsletter Strategic Investment ), are unseen by the individual and occur over long periods. They include the effects of British and American hegemony in the world economy and the effects of Communism, the Japanese economy, and Middle East terrorism. After reviewing these megapolitical events in some detail, the authors relate them to the goals of the investor by offering detailed principles and mechanics. While the advice is not new, the perspective is different and thought-provoking. A good item for public and academic libraries. Steven J. Mayover, Free Lib. Of Philadelphia
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

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4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Now Book Feb. 22 2004
Format:Hardcover
Davidson and Rees-Moog team up to tell us that when things seem the worse may be the time to take advantage of opportunity. The Chinese symbol for crisis also means opportunity.
This book shows that throughout history, some of the greatest became that way because they had the forethought, and sadly, sometimes the foreknowledge, of events that they took advantage of them and won in a big way.
The title of the book comes from Lord Rothshild's statement about when blood is running in the streets, invest in a future. Of course, what to invest in is really the question. This book will give you a look to see and evaluate the opportunities that are out there.
Although the book was written in 1987, it is a now book, filled with facts of how to take advantage of a market. Hey, did Warren Buffett read this? Or did he understand the concept of "Blood in the Streets."
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5.0 out of 5 stars Absurd in 1987, but Prophetic in 2004 June 21 2004
By 1.
Format:Hardcover
The 1987 U.S. stock market crash gave rise to all sorts of "now is the time to panic" and "the world is ending soon" books about financial crises, and economic depressions.
None of it came to pass, because the Reagan revolution demolished communism without a shooting war, and global capitalism surged in the aftermath.
But in 2004, the next workd war has already begun. It is an economic war, where blocs of countries are being organized and urged to join in alliances rooted in ethnicity, religion, or nationality.
The US failue to define terms of engagement, and thereby control the outcome of the Iraq war of 2003-2004 is the end of the dream pf a Pax Americana, with the US acting as the arsenal of a unified, largely democratic world. Instead, we have the non-polarized and chaotic world that Davidson and Rees-Moog feared.
It is a world where capital flows along paths of least resistance, and once welthy populations are devastated by capital outflows. Governments will likely become more tyrannical and shift from benevolent welfare statism to active police statism -- to preserve order.
The book takes its title from the infamous Baron von Rothschild quote about investing where blood runs in the streets. In such places, people crave peace, and safety. They care not who makes the laws, nor who coins the money.
WHile this book seemed absured and hyperbolic in 1987 (like most of the gloom and doom texts of that year), it sees eerily prophetic looking ahead past 2004 and 2005. State-less terrorism is a defining power in today's world. Economies with aging populations are becoming consumption societies, which produce less as the populations age.
Read more ›
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Use Of Economic History June 8 2009
By Patrick Sullivan TOP 500 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
My Dad had copy of this book back in the 1980s. I read the book and was very impressed with the use of economic history. Lord Rothschild made the statement regarding "Don`t buy until there is blood in the streets". The authors attempt to explain how large political upheavals, offer various investing opportunities. They also give lots of examples of when this happened in the past. Perhaps this book may be more timely in 2009.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.6 out of 5 stars  8 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Waited YEARS To Get This... Nov. 18 2006
By C. Jack - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I first learned about this book in 1993 - when it was out of print. I had become acquainted with James Dale Davidson and his sequel to this book, The Great Reckoning. It took nearly a decade before I found a copy...and I am very glad I did.

This isn't light reading...so be forewarned.

The wisdom was true back then...only those in the know were aware of these tactics for amassing wealth by paying attention to whether there truly is VALUE in an industry, in spite of the prices, in spite of the headlines...and preferably buy low, VERY low.

One of the most fundamental teachings...when an industry is fundamentally sound, if everyone is throwing away their share because of some sort of governmental calamity, new article or reporting, does the value of that industry or commodity go away?

No!

So when does it make sense to pick up share?

When there's blood in the streets. Yes...when everyone else is getting rid of their shares/ownership, then you can pick up REAL ASSETS for pennies to dimes on the dollar.

And then wait til they rebound - when the situation that made them "risky" turns around.

Has this strategy worked? Yes, many and many a time. Just look back a decade or so ago when Argentina was having its problems. The inflation was rampant. However other currencies were HARD MONEY to theirs - and you could pick up good investments cheap - then hold them for the ride back to stabilization.

Again...these strategies usually have some holding period for the undervalued asset to rebound. But rebound many of them do.

Examples: junior gold stocks bought for pennies and sold for dollars. Yacht clubs bought, upgraded and resold to upscale international patrons for very big profits.

Pick this book up...and gain insight into how real wealth is made and accumulated. This one key insight works.

With all the economic turmoil going around, I think I need to read this book again!
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Now Book Feb. 22 2004
By Joseph J. Slevin - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Davidson and Rees-Moog team up to tell us that when things seem the worse may be the time to take advantage of opportunity. The Chinese symbol for crisis also means opportunity.
This book shows that throughout history, some of the greatest became that way because they had the forethought, and sadly, sometimes the foreknowledge, of events that they took advantage of them and won in a big way.
The title of the book comes from Lord Rothshild's statement about when blood is running in the streets, invest in a future. Of course, what to invest in is really the question. This book will give you a look to see and evaluate the opportunities that are out there.
Although the book was written in 1987, it is a now book, filled with facts of how to take advantage of a market. Hey, did Warren Buffett read this? Or did he understand the concept of "Blood in the Streets."
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absurd in 1987, but Prophetic in 2004 June 21 2004
By 1. - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
The 1987 U.S. stock market crash gave rise to all sorts of "now is the time to panic" and "the world is ending soon" books about financial crises, and economic depressions.

None of it came to pass, because the Reagan revolution demolished communism without a shooting war, and global capitalism surged in the aftermath.

But in 2004, the next world war has already begun. It is an economic war, where blocs of countries are being organized and urged to join in alliances rooted in ethnicity, religion, or nationality. It is also a culture war, rooted in religion and ethnicity (Islam against 'the west') with a long history that makes it far less amenable to a rational or peaceful resolution thatn was 'The Cold War'.

The US failue to define terms of engagement, and thereby control the outcome of the Iraq war of 2003-2004 is the end of the dream for a Pax Americana, with the US acting as the arsenal of a unified, largely democratic world. Instead, we have the non-polarized and chaotic world that authors Davidson and Rees-Moog feared.

It is a world where capital flows along paths of least resistance, and once welthy populations are devastated by capital outflows. Governments will likely become more tyrannical and shift from benevolent welfare statism to active police statism -- to preserve order.

The book takes its title from the infamous Baron von Rothschild quote about investing where blood runs in the streets. In such places, people crave peace, and safety. They care not who makes the laws, nor who coins the money.

WHile this book seemed absured and hyperbolic in 1987 (like most of the gloom and doom texts of that year), it sees eerily prophetic looking ahead past 2004 and 2005. State-less terrorism is a defining power in today's world. Economies with aging populations are becoming consumption societies, which produce less as the populations age. As exports drop, net inflows of wealth dry up, and the results are soaring government debt, declining employment opportunities for younger people, and increased class divisions and stratifications.

The "great depression of 1990", predicted by dozens of authors, was postposned by the fall of communism, and the expansion of capitalism into eastern Europe & Russia. The collapse of Communism also resulted in a 'peace dividend' that reduced defense costs in the U.S., and provided financial capital to fund new business ventures and fuel economic growth.

The U.S. federal reserve (and other central banks) keept inflation low by funding productive rather than defensive projects. The commercializing of formerly military & defense technologies (the internet, for example) generated economic expansion. That was a cyclical expansion, dependent on the creation of major new growth industries. In the 1990's it was information technologies (communications, networking of data systems, and the opportunities created by rapidly dropping costs for Information Technology equipment. Biotech and life-sciences, the next (current) new industry, has not proved to be stable or predictable in terms of products and markets. Financing models are far less certain.

The economic growth and expansion cycle made possible by the 'peace dividend' and the rapid global advances for Information & Communications tecchnologies postponed the "great depression of 1990". But with a new global war clearly underway, defense and the economic austerity needed to fund a long term global military effort will be the focus of governments. Civil peace is out, and general prosperity is no longer a priority. Thus, it appears that the expansion cycle is coming to an end. The Great depression of 1990 may become the (even greater) depression of 2010.

It is almost scary to read this book from 1987 and realize that the authors may be correct, but their time-line was about 16-17 years ahead of events.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An insightful and comprehensive study on worldwide market trends March 28 2008
By TW - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Mass Market Paperback|Verified Purchase
Blood in the Streets presents an articulate and comprehensive study into the countless variables that are required to assess market trends. If you have ever encountered instances where an analysis, possibly even a very convincing one, appears to only encompass localized fundamentals, and you questioned the strength of such a forecast, this book will unmistakably assist you in defining the failing of such an outlook.

Blood in the Streets presents a very convincing case for considering worldwide fundaments in addition to localized trends. The book further incorporates the steps encouraged to undertake such a comprehensive analysis, backed fully by an abundance of examples.

By now, this book is somewhat outdated in terms of its relevance related to current events; however, its means of study and course of action to seek out opportunities among the trends is absolute. I would recommend this book to anyone seeking insight into any market.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Looking at the world a whole new way Feb. 9 2008
By William J. Hoyt - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Davidson, founder of the National Taxpayer's Union, and Rees-Mogg, former editor of the Times of London, co-authored a triad of books that illustrated the same theme: that changes in technology create mega-political trends that determine how and in what ways governments and companies can project power. Following Nathan Rothchild's famous maxim, "The time to buy is when blood is running in the streets," their first joint effort explains how these mega-political trends affect everything from when it's best to buy real estate or metals to why and in what places terrorism will trouble the world.
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