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Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin Paperback – Oct 2 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books; First Trade Paper Edition edition (Oct. 2 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0465031471
  • ISBN-13: 978-0465031474
  • Product Dimensions: 23.1 x 15.2 x 4.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 590 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,261 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey Swystun TOP 50 REVIEWER on Jan. 13 2011
Format: Hardcover
This was a difficult read. Not for the writing but for the content. As a Canadian of Ukrainian descent, the Holodomor or murder by hunger, was a topic of incredible sensitivity and division within our community. Of course, Snyder's tremendous contribution to the examination of Stalin's and Hitler's terror covers more than the Ukrainian famine. He ingeniously casts a light on a geographic area he calls the Bloodlands, where the dictators and their regimes murdered 14 million people from 1933 to 1945.

The Bloodlands extends from central Poland to western Russia, through Ukraine, Belarus, and the Baltic States. Ukraine was the epicenter where the most lives were lost in WW2. Snyder points out that while Hitler's record was atrocious in war, Stalin's was in peacetime and collectively their actions are near unimaginable.

Snyder begins by examining the Ukrainian famine that began in 1933. It was prompted by a failed five year plan and the effects of collectivization. Stalin, loathe to take responsibility, blamed the peasants and "agitators". The author takes a logical view on the lives lost based on the available information and arrives at 3.3 million. This has always been a contentious issue with Ukrainians but Snyder states his assumptions objectively and this adds to his credibility.

Snyder then covers the deportation of Kulaks, the decimation of the Poles from two sides, Jewish persecution and The Holocaust, and economic and ethnic intentions and actions in the Bloodlands. In fact, if there is an explanation for the killing, Snyder roots it in agriculture. Stalin wanted to collectivize farmers; Hitler wanted to eliminate them so Germans could colonize the land.

The book's scope is overwhelming especially to those new to this period.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Len TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 8 2011
Format: Hardcover
The numbers are mind boggling and they come with despairing frequency in Mr. Snider's book, 'Bloodlands.' Some might blame desperate times, others, dangerous ideologies and still others, ruthless dictators. The strength of 'Bloodlands' is that Mr. Snider lets nobody off the hook. The starvation of Ukranian farmers caused by ridiculous farm quotas was not result of the actions of one man. Others had to enforce the quota. Produce had to be taken from the starving. Those who enacted these policies knew what they were doing. Likewise, Nazis death camps were staffed by otherwise ordinary citizens, men and women like you and me who must have been convinced of either the righteousness of their heinous acts or at least their inevitability. Mr. Snider tells us that it's easy to relate to the plight of the victims. Much harder and perhaps more enlightening, is an understanding of the actions and motivations of the criminals. We know about the Nazi work camps like Auschwitz because there were survivors. We know less about the death camps like Treblinka and Chelmno where Jews were sent for the sole purpose of extermination. And the numbers keep coming and coming, millions gone from the Ukraine, millions from Poland. The Bloodlands of Eastern Europe where more people perished in a generation than at any other time in history. An understanding of the atrocities committed in the name of ideals is essential if we are to prevent a recurrence. Mr. Snider has certainly made a start.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joe Reader on Feb. 9 2011
Format: Hardcover
Some of us thought we had read all there is to read about WW2. For me,this book was the most captivating one of its kind, with detail that was overwhelming. A must read for even the most knowledgable on the subject of the Second World War, especially with reference to the ideology and methodology of these two leaders; Stalin and Hitler.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Broadsword on Feb. 1 2011
Format: Hardcover
I thought I had read all there was to read on this area of the world, at that point in history - what an eye-opener! There were parts during the description of the Holodomor years that I actually had to stop, put the book down and gather my thoughts for a moment. This book should be required reading for all high-school seniors, especially before embarking on the often dubious, post-secondary indoctrination that passes for a liberal arts education these days.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dariusz Piatkowski on Oct. 16 2013
Format: Paperback
The promise of this book was an impartial, objective review of what actually happened in those terrible years. The ethnicities affected by the war, the suffering and the people who tried to survive it all.

The author does a great job of detailing the political motives of the Soviet starvation campaigns. As the depth of the book builds and as further and further one is drawn into the depth of the despair it finally dawns on the reader that from about the mid-point of the volume the book becomes strangely Holocaust centric in it's point of view. And this really is my major objection to this otherwise terrific work.

My goal in reading this book was to understand the impact of the Nazi and Soviet policies on the nations of the Eastern Europe. Yet strangely enough the author at some point in the book actually defines the borders of 'bloodlands' as those which defined the geographical borders within which the Holocaust played out. Boy...that was NOT the point here...where are the details which pertain to non-Jewish impact of these terrible policies? Very little substance is presented to support the Polish impact, after all, let us not forget that WW2 started when the Nazi Germany and Stalinist Soviet Union attacked Poland.

If you are looking for an objective point of view unfortunately you need to keep on looking. On the other hand, if you want yet another in-depth study of Jewish suffering during WW2 this book might deliver.
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