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Body Language Of Horses Hardcover – May 1 1980


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; 1 edition (May 1 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0688036201
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688036201
  • Product Dimensions: 1.9 x 15.8 x 23.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 249 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #406,786 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Format: Hardcover
I was rather disappointed with this book for several reasons. First and foremost, the bulk of the book does not, as the title would have us believe, focus on the body language of horses. A couple of chapters devote themselves to brief descriptions of horse behavior under different circumstances (when happy, angry, frightened, bored, tired, hot, cold, hungry, thirsty, etc.), but the largest sections of the book concern curing problem horses and training foals. At the end there is a chapter on observing the body language of racehorses in order to pick winners, and two appendices on how to buy a horse.
Not only does the book stray from it's purported topic, but the information that IS given about equine body language is so basic and obvious that any true horseperson would already know it, and any aspiring horseperson could learn it all in a matter of a few weeks spent around the creatures. Of course a nervous horse will work up a sweat, a bored horse will get mouthy, and a horse that is irritated by a fly will swish its tail and twitch its skin. There are really only two forseeable uses, in my mind, for this book. The first is as a reference for those who know next to nothing about horses and wish to learn. The second, a slightly different version of the first, is as a guide to non-equestrian racegoers in order to pick winning horses on which to place their bets (and this is not surefire or guaranteed in any way, since pre-race behavior is only one of many factors that determines the outcome of a race).
The book is also considerably old, and a bit dated. It was written and first published in 1980, more than two decades ago. While the basic behavior of horses hasn't changed in that time, much else in the horse world has, including attitudes toward the care and training of horses.
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By A Customer on May 27 2003
Format: Hardcover
If you want to learn about the nuances of horse body language and behaviour Robert Vavra's "Such Is the Real Nature of Horses" will tell you much more than this book.
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Format: Hardcover
I was a complete novice when it came to horses, but after I spent some time with this book, I was a changed man! I have nothing but rave reviews for this. To the writer who wants to know about horses and horse behavior, this book is perfect. Good description and a good index for easy reference in times of need. I didn't finish reading it yet, and I didn't need to as far as I'm concerned. I'm sold!
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Format: Hardcover
For someone who is just learning about horses, as I am, this book is a gratifying shortcut. It tells what to expect, what to do and not do, and basically---how horses think, act, and react, and what their real needs are. I couldn't put it down...and thank the authors for being so thorough! I've observed some "veteran" horse persons whose horse-wisdom would be enhanced mightily if they read this book from cover to cover. Five stars!
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By A Customer on April 26 2000
Format: Hardcover
I learned nothing about the body language of horses that I didnt already learn from being around them for 2 weeks.
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By A Customer on April 16 2000
Format: Hardcover
The title is misleading. Only 60 pages or so actually go into the "body language" of horses, and about half of that focuses on horses at the racetrack. The rest of the book attempts to cover how horses perceive the world, problem horses, and foal training. It was almost as if the authors did not have enough material for a whole book on horse body language. In their effort to be all-encompassing about various horse conditions (the happy horse, the cold horse, the submissive horse, the sour horse, the tired horse, the thirsty horse, etc.) they skimp on details and nuances as they devote only a brief paragraph (but sometimes a page or two) to each horse type. Perhaps one of the problems with the disjointed coverage stems from the backgrounds of the authors. Ainslie is a racetrack handicapper, Ledbetter is an equestrian. This pairing doesn't necessary work.
This book is probably okay for someone absolutely brand new to horses and unfamiliar with horse behavior. Word of caution to those readers though: don't blindly accept the authors' generalizations about horse body language as applying to all horses in all situations! The authors try to put into human terms the emotions the horse is experiencing. This is a dangerous perspective to take if you're new to horses. Instead, you should be trying to learn how to think like a horse. If you are really interested in horses and what makes them tick, find Moyra Williams' book "Horse Psychology." While Williams won't tell you a tail held high means the horse is happy or proud, her book will offer you much more insight.
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