CDN$ 19.98 + CDN$ 3.49 shipping
In Stock. Sold by Vanderbilt CA

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Born to Fight
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Born to Fight


List Price: CDN$ 21.99
Price: CDN$ 19.98
You Save: CDN$ 2.01 (9%)
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Vanderbilt CA.
3 new from CDN$ 19.98


Product Details

  • Actors: Nappon Gomarachun, Santisuk Promsiri, Dan Chupong, Piyapong Piew-on, Somrak Khamsing
  • Directors: Panna Rittikrai
  • Writers: Panna Rittikrai, Morakat Kaewthanek, Thanapat Taweesuk
  • Producers: Prachya Pinkaew, Sita Vosbein, Sukanya Vongsthapat, Tech Akarapol
  • Format: Color, Dubbed, DVD-Video, Full Screen, NTSC
  • Language: English, Thai
  • Dubbed: English
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Bci / Eclipse
  • Release Date: May 15 2007
  • Run Time: 96 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000NDI3P8
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #135,039 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
ey guys, amazon made a mistake in this solicitation. the box says panna rittikrai born to fight and this is that movie from 1986 its not the one from 2004 which features dan chupong. on the credits it says dan chupong in this movie but hes not.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. Stana on Feb. 18 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
If you like Tony Jaa, Dan Chupong is the next great fighter to come out of Thailand and is six years younger than Tony Jaa. There is more than enough action to satisfy anybody. The movie starts with a bang and second half of the movie is all action.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 23 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Please note their are two versions of this film available May 30 2007
By M. Herzog - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Please note, that there are two versions of this film available. There is the 1986 born to fight, and the 2004 remake (by ironically the same director). The 1986 version contains a special feature Tony Jaa talking about why he liked the movie and how it influenced him, as well as a spoof of ong bak, with the 1986 film. The 2004 is a more lean and mean movie, released by Dragon Dynasty, with different special features. Make sure you know what you're getting before you pruchase it.

With the 2004 version, I will review. I thought the action sequences were amazing. I'm always shocked the lengths someone will go for a stunt. This, like Ong Bak, is showing a growing trend among loosing the unreality and CG in favor of more real action. The trouble is the plot is rather bland, and goes no where. However, if you liked the protector, and could get past the "where's my elephant?" storyline, then this shouldn't phase you too much. Also, Tony Jaa is sorley missing from this movie. He is great at action, but has a bit of charisma and acting talent, which is also lacking from this movie. But I digress. It is entertaining and I recomend it.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
A hidden gem! I loved it, great to add next to Ong-Bak on your shelf! June 25 2007
By Amiable-Akuma - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Anybody who enjoys both old 70's kung fu films and modern action masterpieces like Ong Bak and Tom Yum Goong - will think this title is a terrific addition to their collection. The fight sequences were filmed with nearly all full contact for brutal realism and they are excellent, especially for their time, - and seeing Tony Jaa's mentor Panna Rittikrai as a lead will make you a big fan of him as well.

As long as you set your expectations to what you will be getting (a low-budget Thai B-movie from 1986 after all!), you will be amazed. The fights are choreographed and play out like a combination of the modern style used in Ong Bak and that used in older Wu-Tang Clan style kung fu movies. But you won't be disappointed - I was personally surprised to see a ton of great slow motion, double takes, and editing in the fights to allow the viewer to really see the punishing impacts.

One thing that surprised me about this film is that THE DUB IS EXCELLENT!!! I am normally somebody who HATES watching live-action dubbed but I was shocked to see just how perfect the voices used were and how spot-on the "acting"/matching/and writing of the dub were. In part a lot of it's value comes from the dub having great "camp" flavor but it mostly stays true to the script and, IMO, improves the movie a great deal for English-speaking fans who just want to kick back and enjoy the experience.

The story is pretty basic but it generally works to stage the action, keep you interested, and add a little comedy here and there. You could nitpick some of its faults (at times things can get a little slow or dry) but who cares - you came to see some great fight/stunt sequences. And you do get quite a few cool ones!

Generally there is an entertaining fight on screen every ten minutes of it's runtime. In several different scenes, Panna is outnumbered by a gang of guys attacking him one after another and he dispatches them with great, brutal Muy Thai mixed martial arts. Two standout scenes are a motorcyle chase sequence that features at least two "oh my god, rewind that NOW!" kinds of moments and the finale where Panna goes up against a gang of ninjas. Taking the ninjas on in a forest clearing, - fighting hand-to-hand, with weapons, and on a wooden platform - the stuntmen are really tested as several brutal moves are executed in a scene that plays out like an early version of the very last scene in Ong Bak.

This DVD is likely as good a treatment as this movie will get too. Comparing the video of the feature versus some of its footage shown during the extras, it is obvious that they used the cleanest print of the film that they could find. It is presented in the 4:3 aspect ratio, which is either likely the way in which it was originally filmed or the only way we are likely to see it since so many of these early Thai films seem to have been preserved only in 4:3 with much of the original film stock expired (see the "Ong Bak 2" entry on Wikipedia). The extras are nice too and are all thankfully subtitled in English.

A detailed interview with Tony Jaa on a Thai talk show provides a lot of insight into Tony Jaa's early beginnings and into his relationship with Panna, the star of this film. Clips of Tony Jaa demonstrating his moves and cool scenes from some other early Thai B-movies he starred in are also shown. It's a great addition and the best extra on the disc. The 30+ minute documentary that follows a stuntman going through the process of being hired by Jaa's production company is also interesting and insightful but probably not something you will want to see more than once. There are two "Ong Bak spoofs" as well but these are mostly throw-away extras that will likely just leave you confused and disinterested.

Overall this is a fun, engaging title that I hope has some success on DVD so we can see more hidden gems like it released on our shores.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Dragon Dynasty's release of Born to Fight (2004) June 7 2007
By morgoth - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
Dan Chupong stars as a cop who goes with his sister to a charity event that is supported by Thai Olympic athletes. His sister is a Taekwondo champion and many other real life Olympic champions are at the charity as well. When an evil army takes over the town where the charity is being held, the athletes must help the village fight the terrorists.

The action is mostly stunts. All real stunts, though they do slip in a bit of C.G.I. There is the occasional fight, but it is all about the stunts in this movie. There are scenes where guys go flying through the air doing multiple flips and end with crashing into a burning frame of a building! Words can't really describe how amazing the stunts are, it is just something you have to see for yourself. And don't think that there are just 1 or 2 action stars in the movie. ALL of the actors can do their own stunts. The people who fight in the movie range anywhere from age 8 to 80. There is even a one-legged guy who gets to show off his skills! You also have the scene where they fight with real firelogs. Not a firelog hitting someone in the head once and then a cut, but long, extended takes of actors hitting eachother over and over again with real thick firelogs and embers flying in everyone's eyes. It would take a review literally 20 times longer than this to go over all the incredible things that happen in this movie. It is your average direct to TV action movie, but with some of the greatest stunts ever filmed. If you are a fan of the ultra low budget films that Panna made in the 80's and 90's, you will be happy to see what he can do with an almost limitless budget.

3.5/5

Picture quality and sound are perfect. English dub included if you don't like subtitles.

The only special features are a commentary from Bey Logan, a 5 minute look behind the scenes, and a great 65 minute documentary on the making of the film. Nothing like Dragon Dynasty's release of The Protector (Two-Disc Collector's Edition), but still very informative.

I will end this review with some of Prachya Pinkaew's thoughts on Hollywood action cinema compared to Thai.

"I think if we're going to use lots of techniques like Hollywood, or use lots of money or lots of C.G., we won't be able compete with them. The only way we could compete with them is in terms of our body, our skills, and our heart. We put these 3 things together. I used to tell our crews that we lose the battle before we even start. The only thing we could use to compete with them are our lives, meaning you have to trade your life for the movie. It might sound a bit too much, but it means you have to sell your skills, your confidence. You have to risk your life. What you get in return is a certain uniqueness, which looks most dangerous. We'll remain unique for a very long time."
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
full screen vs. wide screen Aug. 4 2007
By Nayan Bhula - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
I've been so impressed with the latest string of amazing martial arts movies out of Thailand, that when I saw this i picked it up right away. The film itself has some amazing stunts & action, but there are two problems with this DVD. 1) The print they used is pretty bad, not remastered at all, still watchable though and 2) It's a fullscreen presentation. A lot of times this really doesn't matter, but this DVD really shows you its shortcomingsl; you miss some of the flow of the action, as fighters drift in and out of the frame. I found it frustraing. The DVD comes with some great extra features, so if you're a fan it's worth owning. The newer "Born to Fight" by Panna has a fantastic Dragon Dynasty release, maybe they should have package both films together. It needed that professional, respected Dragon Dynasty touch. This reminds me of those terrible Dimension Jackie Chan & Jet Li DVD releases, definitely put out by a non-fan. This are one step up with nice bonus features, but the movie like I said is not up to par...Can't wait for what Panna & Tony do for Ong-Bak 2!
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
some amazing stunts keep this from being a total bomb July 23 2008
By Mantis - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD
This flick starts well enough: In Thailand, an undercover cop (Dan Chupong, "Dynamite Warrior") busts a drug kingpin and loses his friend and partner in the process. While lamenting, he decides to accompany his gymnast sister, and some other athletes, to an economically-challenged village for a charity event. While there, a group of paramilitary terrorists take over the village, kill large amounts of its residents, and demand the release of the dude that Chupong just put away. Eventually realizing that they will all be killed, the villagers unite to try and overthrow their captors, completely ignoring their impulses toward the Stockholm Syndrome.

Now if there are good fights and stunts, I can usually handle stupid. The final 3rd of the movie is ALL action... and couldn't be more boring. Nearly 30 minutes of face kicking, gun fighting, explosions, and vehicle crashes, 97% of which is in slow-motion, accompanied by guitar-tinged music ripped off from "The Matrix". I guess it wasn't enough to dispense with what little logic it had left. I'd be a liar if I said that there aren't moments of "ooh...ahhh...", but its so ridiculous, and ridiculously done that nearly all entertainment value is jettisoned.

This is easily the worst film I've seen that Dragon Dynasty has released, though I have yet to catch "Dragon Heat" and "Dog Bite Dog". I've heard (from sources I trust) that those are even worse. Be that as it is, I love Dragon Dynasty, and for what they've done with Asian cinema for us North American fans, I'll always be grateful.

Picture quality is widescreen and excellent, as we've come to expect from DD. In Thai with optional English dub. Subtitles in English or Spanish. If this is available in the cheapo-rental section of your local video hut, it may be worth a glance. Again, there are some VERY impressive stunts, just not enough to make a good movie out of.

2004


Feedback