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Borne in Blood: A Novel of the Count Saint-Germain Hardcover – Dec 10 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (Dec 10 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765317133
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765317131
  • Product Dimensions: 17.1 x 3 x 23.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 590 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,566,247 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

If Anne Rice is the celebrity journalist of vampires, Yarbro is their domestic chronicler. The meticulous 20th entry in her Count Saint-Germain saga (after 2006's Roman Dusk) finds her 4,000-year-old hero in the Swiss countryside of 1817, helping the struggling locals recover from the Napoleonic wars and severe winters. By this period, Saint-Germain is a cultured and compassionate figure, occupied with the spread of knowledge through publishing and the child custody struggles of his lover, Hero Corvosaggio. His greatest threats come from discharged soldiers turned bandits and an abused debutante turned murderer, whose blood-obsessed guardian he lectures on the difference between heredity and destiny. Monsters are made, he knows, not born. Yarbro piles on the historical detail, giving an intimate look at the households of early 19th-century Europe and the commerce and travels of its inhabitants. Letters, with headnotes on their delivery methods and times, litter the text, adding to the period feel. Intimate, too, describes Saint-Germain and Hero, whose relationship is explored in fine-grained emotional as well as physical terms.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"This book should be savored like fine wine."
--Publishers Weekly (starred review) on Roman Dusk
 
"Quinn Yarbro is one of our finest writers and craftpersons, incapable of a slack paragraph, or a fuzzy thought.  Everything is perfectly focused, everything is expertly accomplished.  The Count remains a vibrantly original character, one of the greatest contributions to the horror genre."
--Peter Straub

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 14 reviews
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
You've Read This Book Before March 13 2008
By Dai-keag-ity - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
You've Read This Book Before

Sure you have. Except for its setting it is exactly like all previous Saint-Germain novels. Same oppressed damsel in distress, same altruistically rescuing yet personally imperiled alchemist-vampire count, same resolution, even several lines more or less lifted from past exploits in this decades-long series. As I've said before, Ms. Yarbro definitely needs to vary her plots. (Her stories need new blood, ha-ha.)

The reason I keep reading her books is for the fact that few other fiction writers active today can match her ability to truly give the past so much multi-dimensional clarity. When you read her works you come away knowing almost everything about a time period. You know what challenges people of the age had to overcome in order to survive, you know what they were thinking, what frightened them, what they hoped to achieve, what they ate, drank, wore, believed, what was happening in the world in terms of climate. When you read a Saint-Germain book you even come away understanding what a particular time and place smelled like. All that is brilliant. It is so brilliant, in fact, that it pardons much that is less impressive about Quinn's novels, and has kept me reading for many years now when I've sometimes wondered if I shouldn't abandon the series.

I have asked before, though, why does this author have so much difficulty in varying her plots? They are all as formulaic as A+B=C. Every time! I'm not joking. In every novel it's: unjustly tormented women meets heroic vampire figure who delivers her from evil. End of story. And this book was no exception. Surely someone with Chelsea Quinn Yarbro's creativity and intellect knows this about her books, so why can't she make things a little different?

I did enjoy Borne In Blood's setting, its exploration of emerging modern science, the lengths to which Napoleon Bonaparte was deservedly vilified for the ongoing disastrous impact his megalomaniacal ambitions had on Europe long after he himself was dead, and it was also nice to check in on old friends and see, well, what the heck the Count was up to in the 1810's.

I'm not emptily picking on this author. Ms. Yarbro can write. She also utilizes her exhaustive research well in weaving her stories. If only I could find some variety in her plotlines, I'd hail her as a genius, instead of a fine historian masquerading only moderately successfully as a novelist.

About 3 ½ stars, mostly because she does history so well.
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Quiet Yet Compelling Dec 28 2007
By Bonnie G. Papini - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I always await Yabro's next installment in the St. Germain saga with great anticipation. Some of her novels are full of big historical events that nearly overwhelm her vampire hero. The Chinese invasion of Genghis Khan and the decline of classical Rome fall into this category. Others are set in quieter times and give an impression of what normal problems a four thousand year old entity can face and how he addresses them. Of course, St. Germain has extra abilities that make his problem solving unique. This latest chapter in St. Germain's long "life" is set in a period between tumultuous events, shortly after the defeat of Napoleon. Consequently, no battle scenes interrupt Yarbro's exploration of the vampire's efforts to connect with the humanity he lost four millennia ago.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Borne in Blood Jan. 14 2008
By Amazon Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
This is another in a fine series by Chelsea Quinn Yarbro - for those already familiar with St Germaine, it is a must have, for those unfamiliar with the character but interested in vampire romance, bear in mind it's not Anita Blake.
Written on a number of levels, historical, romance and horror, it illuminates a period of St Germaine's life previously hinted at in previous works by the author, and referencing previous works.
Definitely a must have.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Borne to Excellence March 24 2008
By Tim Lasiuta - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Borne in Blood: Count Saint Germain #20

The life of Count Saint Germain is extraordinary. This time, Yarbro sets our sights on the Swiss countryside of 1817. Culturally speaking, the Swiss population is recovering from the Napoleonic wars and very severe weather. By this time period, the printing industry had advanced, and guided by 3800 years of `living' behind him, his wisdom has now firmly been established and now he is able to help spread his knowledge through publishing. His lover, Hero Corvosaggio, was widowed by Napoleon and their 2 sons are being raised by their grandfather. Hero, is a tragic figure, haunted by the loss of her prestige and sons, and yet buoyed by her love for the Count. While this personal relationship blooms, Saint Germain becomes intrigued with Graf Von Ravensbergs' research into blood. Clearly fascinated with the results, Saint Germain keeps abreast amidst the romantic interest of Hyacinthe in him. Love triangles can be dangerous, especially when a vampire is involved and mental instability characterizes Hyacinthe.

Like any Saint Germain book, Yarbro has included details that create a `been there' atmosphere. Her research into what actually occurred in a household of that time is extensive and help create an intimacy with the locale. Even the correspondence has the feel of just having been delivered by courier. The Saint-Germain chronicles are more romance than vampire fiction, and it is perhaps that element that is their genius. Why would an `immortal' just exist to drink blood and spread a curse? Over the course of an average life, knowledge and wisdom are copious, how more so over millennia?

To say this is `just' another novel would be not enough. Come, enter into the world of 1817, and the existence of Saint Germain, one more time.

Tim Lasiuta

[...]
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
It's nice to catch up with an old friend May 29 2008
By Mythadventures - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Borne in Blood is Chelsea Quinn Yarbro's 20th entry in her Saint Germain series. I've been reading the counts adventures from the beginning. At this point it feel like I'm catching up with an old friend. Her meticulous attention to detail really helps to visualize the time period of the book. Borne in Blood takes place right after the end of the Napoleonic wars. Saint-Germain has taken as a companion a woman, Hero, widowed by the war. Hero is in a struggle with her father-in-law to have access to her children. Yabro highlights just how few rights women have in this time period. It also shows how women are so used to such treatment that they just accept it without questions. In a sense this is more a story about Hero, than it is the count. As such the threat this time is directed toward Hero, and it is up to the count to rescue her.

The ending was predictable, but that didn't bother me. As I said in the beginning, the count seems like an old friend, and I don't always want to see him battered at the end of the book.


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