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Boys and Girls Learn Differently!: A Guide for Teachers and Parents [Hardcover]

Michael Gurian
3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)

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Book Description

March 1 2001 Wiley Audio
In this profoundly significant book, author Michael Gurian synthesizes this current knowledge and clearly demonstrates how this distinction in hard-wiring and socialized gender differences affects how boys and girls learn. Gurian presents a new way to educate our children based on brain science, neurological development, and chemical and hormonal disparities.

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Product Details


Product Description

From Publishers Weekly

Educator and author Gurian (The Wonder of Boys) and his co-writers argue that from preschool to high school, brain differences between the sexes call for different teaching strategies. While it's widely accepted that, in general, boys do better in math and girls in language, the authors claim that, until recently, society has taken the politically correct but scientifically inaccurate classroom view that children of both genders learn best in an "androgynous classroom." Presenting a detailed picture of boys' and girls' neurological, chemical and hormonal disparities, the authors explain how those differences affect learning. Although Gurian et al. address the problems of both genders, they focus on boys, contending that they are more difficult to teach and have more learning and discipline problems. The female brain, Gurian says, has a "learning advantage" because it is more complex and active, although the male brain does excel at abstract thinking and spatial relations, one reason why boys do better in math. Drawing on anecdotes contributed by teachers participating in a Missouri-based pilot program launched by the Michael Gurian Institute, the authors present a variety of methods, from pairing a language activity with movement for boys, to using role models to engage girls in academic risk taking. Throughout, the authors stress the importance of teacher training, arguing that regrettably few teachers are knowledgeable about this issue. (Apr.)Forecast: With a seven-city author tour to spark media interest and follows the huge success of The Wonder of Boys, this book will be picked up by parents eager to learn more of what Gurian has to say. Most Americans are intensely concerned about the state of our educational system, so the book could reach beyond its target readership of teachers and parents.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

Despite feminism and efforts to desexualize teaching, boys and girls persistently exhibit different learning styles. Based on two decades of research in 30 cultures around the world and the observations made at the Michael Gurian Institute at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, this book explores the reasons for those differences in processing information and learning. Part 1 examines research on the brain that indicates physical differences, such as male brains being larger and female brains maturing earlier. Part 2 offers practical, grade-level-appropriate advice for developing learning environments that accommodate boys' and girls' differing learning styles. The book notes the fundamental differences--boys are more active and physical, girls more verbal and social--but cautions against stereotyping children and neglecting the individuality of specific kids. It outlines the components of the "ultimate classroom," one that supports both sexes in learning, and illustrates with actual classroom experiences. Helpful tables outline different strategies, and the book encourages teaching teachers to "mentor both aggression and empathy." Useful for parents and teachers alike. Vanessa Bush
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
NANCY LYNN TAUGHT NEARLY EVERY GRADE IN HER THIRTY-EIGHT-YEAR career. Read the first page
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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Customer Reviews

Most helpful customer reviews
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Astounded July 10 2003
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
I'm truly astounded at the ignorance of the reviewer cc, who clearly has an agenda of her own (just click on her profile).
Any mother who has a son and a daughter CLEARLY understands that you can put a doll in a little boys hand for the rest of your life and all he will do with it is twirl it around by it's hair or launch it in a rocket blaster.
I too believed that nonsense of nurture when I learned that in college and encourage my first born son to play with all types of different toys. My son was obsessed with balls from day one, in fact, his first word was ball, not mama or dada. Any doll was quickly ditched for a chance to throw something, build something or bulldoze something.
Having my son start kindergarten was an eye opener for me as well. Schools are set up for girls, not boys. My son does not want to sit still all day, my son does not want to sit and read books like my daughter will do all day long. My son wants to be physical, wants to conquer, wants to be busy doing... he wants to learn by doing. Unfortunately, schools want him to sit and act nice. Teachers at this stage in education do not understand the differneces and consistantly recommend drugging boys well into adolecence to get them to "behave". My son is a perfectly well adjusted very sweet kind young boy. He does not have any emotional problems, he just wants to do other things that girls do not want to do.
I praise Gurian for writing the books that he has. They have given me tremendous strength and wisdom to know what's "normal" for a boy. And yes, boys and girls are different. I don't believe that is politically incorrect to say. It's a fact.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Review of Boys and Girls learn Differently Aug. 21 2002
Format:Paperback
Educator, Family Therapist and Author, Michael Gurian has put together a great resource for teachers and parents. Boys and Girls Learn Differently goes inside students' brains and tells the reader how and why boys and girls process information differently. The author writes as if he was speaking directly to the reader. The book, which is separated into two sections, is clearly focused on an audience of educators and parents. The first section goes into full detail about the neurological differences between boys and girls and howy they learn differently. In the second part of the book, the author provides concrete examples of how to incorporate the knowledge learned in part one into the classroom setting. Gurian suggests steps that should be taken to maximize learning for all students from Kindergarten through High School.
This book is an exceptionally helpful resource for teachers and parents in understanding the differences in learning between boys and girls and compliments my philosophy on education. The one subject that I would have liked to see addressed is the notion that each and every student is a unique individual and therefore learns in his or her own distinct manner. As educators, it is our responsibility to make the learning environment well rounded so all students are cultivated to their maximum learning potential. I recommend that every educator and parent, interested in learning about how boys and girls process information differently, enjoy this informative and enjoyable book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must for All Teachers and Parents March 7 2002
Format:Paperback
This book is a MUST for current teachers, parents, and anyone working with children of ALL ages.
This book will help the reader understand how brain research has and should be included in every certified teacher curriculum materials. This "textbook" should be provided for in-service instruction for current teachers, child care workers, parents, guardians, mentors, tutors, and ANY one working with children.
The MI (Multiple Intelligences) approach is still valid and is in fact relied on by many to answer the age old question: "How do Boys and Girls Learn? What are the differences in learning styles." By taking your knowledge regarding MI and include the latest reserach on brain research, the child in your life will benefit and you too will feel like you are making the difference in the life of a child.
Go get the book, read it, then apply that knowledge within the classroom, home, church, day care, and anywhere/anyone working with children.
DG
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Review of Boys and Girls learn Differently Aug. 21 2002
Format:Paperback
Educator, Family Therapist and Author, Michael Gurian has put together a great resource for teachers and parents. Boys and Girls Learn Differently goes inside students' brains and tells the reader how and why boys and girls process information differently. The author writes as if he was speaking directly to the reader. The book, which is separated into two sections, is clearly focused on an audience of educators and parents. The first section goes into full detail about the neurological differences between boys and girls and howy they learn differently. In the second part of the book, the author provides concrete examples of how to incorporate the knowledge learned in part one into the classroom setting. Gurian suggests steps that should be taken to maximize learning for all students from Kindergarten through High School.
This book is an exceptionally helpful resource for teachers and parents in understanding the differences in learning between boys and girls and compliments my philosophy on education. The one subject that I would have liked to see addressed is the notion that each and every student is a unique individual and therefore learns in his or her own distinct manner. As educators, it is our responsibility to make the learning environment well rounded so all students are cultivated to their maximum learning potential. I recommend that every educator and parent, interested in learning about how boys and girls process information differently, enjoy this informative and enjoyable book.
Was this review helpful to you?
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Most recent customer reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Book
This book is worth the purchase for parents who want to better understand their child's learning style. Read more
Published on July 12 2010 by Samuel Mystal
1.0 out of 5 stars can't educate by sterotyping
How can our children be best educated if behavior and
learning styles are sterotyped? No! It's impossible to educate with narrow minded beliefs about our sons and... Read more
Published on March 13 2004
1.0 out of 5 stars y=x makes perfect sense to me Guian
As a math student in the 90's I had no problem understanding
y=x.Our teachers never said " y is the same as x" and the
girls never had a problem understanding... Read more
Published on Jan. 6 2004
1.0 out of 5 stars a book with an agenda to keep the status quo
Gurian has an agenda to keep the status quo intact.The premise
of boys being more able at spatial and mathematical ability
comes from an old pop science notion. Read more
Published on June 4 2003 by CC
1.0 out of 5 stars this writer needs to go BACK to school!!!
So sad we live in a world with so many labels and
sterotypes.
Any teacher who applies this ...book to
the experience of a true life classroom is making a ... Read more
Published on June 2 2003 by CC
4.0 out of 5 stars Buy the book -- not the audiobook
This author has much to say, but the limitations of a 2-cassette abridgment make it difficult to learn much from this audiobook. Read more
Published on March 30 2003 by Linda
5.0 out of 5 stars Closing the Gender Gap
An excellent resource for parents and teachers in understanding the difference in how boys and girls learn. In Elementary grade classrooms, many particle applications are provided. Read more
Published on Sept. 21 2001 by Diane Gittings
4.0 out of 5 stars The perfect gift for an educator.
If you know an inovative teacher who tries new startegies to reach all students this book is the perfect gift. Read more
Published on Aug. 12 2001 by Peggy Best
2.0 out of 5 stars Sexual phrenology for today
Girls are apparently six times more likely than boys to sing in tune - a rare admission of quantification in Michael Gurian's book. Read more
Published on July 22 2001 by Chris Brand
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