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Breaking Windows: A Fantastic Metropolis Sampler [Hardcover]

Luis Rodrigues
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: CDN$ 33.68 & FREE Shipping. Details
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Book Description

July 1 2003
Edited by Luis Rodrigues, Breaking Windows features a well-balanced presentation of stories, interviews, and essays from the avant garde Fantastic Metropolis website. Featuring a stunning cover by Hawk Alfredson, Breaking Windows includes such contributors as Michael Moorcock, Jeff VanderMeer, China Mieville, Carol Emshwiller, Andrew S. Fuller, Zoran Zivkovic, Dan Pearlman, John Dodds, Rhys Hughes, Jeffrey Ford, Colin Brush, Barrington Bayley, Rachel Pollack, Aleksandar Gatalica, Nathan Ballingrud, Luis Filipe Silva, Joao Barreiros, L. Timmel Duchamp, James Sallis, Andrew Hedgecock, Jeff Topham, and Paul Witcover.

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Most helpful customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Aug. 8 2003
Format:Paperback
This book is an excuse to re-read the best stuff from the Fantastic Metropolis Web site.
Read Moorcock's editorial, which is sort of a second introduction after Luís' exploration of the city in speculative fiction and the genesis of the site, to get a sense of what Fantastic Metropolis is all about. There's no manifesto, just a committment to creativity, diversity, and originality. Luís did an excellent job culling the best of the best from the site, and keeping the reading interesting with essays, interviews, lists, and of course fiction. And the book even *looks* good.
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Amazon.com: 4.4 out of 5 stars  5 reviews
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Aug. 8 2003
By Mr. Michael A. Simanoff - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is an excuse to re-read the best stuff from the Fantastic Metropolis Web site.
Read Moorcock's editorial, which is sort of a second introduction after Luís' exploration of the city in speculative fiction and the genesis of the site, to get a sense of what Fantastic Metropolis is all about. There's no manifesto, just a committment to creativity, diversity, and originality. Luís did an excellent job culling the best of the best from the site, and keeping the reading interesting with essays, interviews, lists, and of course fiction. And the book even *looks* good.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not one hundred percent convinced... Aug. 7 2004
By isala - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Fantastic Metropolis is a fantastic idea, and I am sure it will help science fiction much in the years to come. Science Fiction, as I see it, is in desperate need of some new ideas. These are people that are more inspired by Merwyn Peake than by Tolkien. They want more intelligent and stylistically advanced science fiction. Now, that is difficult, since it must also be readable. In this sampler I much preferred the editorials and non-fiction over the short stories! I feel that in their creative joy, some authors have missed out on plots or interesting stories. Science Fiction is, at the heart of it, based on plot, not characterization or style. On the other hand, modern scince fiction is deperately lacking in both. I hope that in the future the editors of Fantastic Metropolis will manage to create a viable fusion. So, my verdict is that buy it to read the interesting editorials, and to suport the work of the Fantastic Metropolis website.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Quite There Jan. 24 2007
By Grey Wolffe - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Breaking windows is a compendium from the Experimental Fantasy Website of FantasticMetropolis (which is now unfortunately in a stasis mode, though still accessable). The website is/was run by Luis Rodrigues in conjunction with Michael Moorcock, and was patterned after Harlan Ellison's "Dangerous Visions". It's mission was to take fantasy out of the Tolkienesque model and expand it to (and over, under, whatever) the far reaches of the genre.

The book is made up of four sections but only one of them is actual stories. The others are Essays, Interview, and Intros. I found most of the stories to be (at the least) interesting and different, but he rest of the book (about 100 of the 245 pages) to be fill. Michael Moorcock's piece about Mervyn Peake reads like a child's complaint that no one under- stands the talent of his idol; it reads more like a whine that a paen.

But, you make up your own mind.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A remarkable treasure trove of fiction, information, and opinion Feb. 23 2007
By Schtinky - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
'Breaking Windows' is a compilation of editorials, fiction, non-fiction, and interviews by such distinguished authors as Michael Moorcock, China Mieville, and Jeff VanderMeer. Moorcock's recollections and revelations in his editorial are priceless to the hard-core fan of SciFi who's followed the genre's lengthy and sometimes patchy road. His non-fiction tribute to writer/poet/artist Mervyn Peake (Gormenghast) is a "must read".

This book isn't just an anthology; it's a celebration of authors, publishers, creators and supporters of a popular genre, advice, information, and imagination.

The non-fictional tributes are geared toward authors vastly unsung in today's business-orientated publishing houses. True masters of written word, these writers wound out not being generic enough for the tedium of cash hungry editors. Some authors, such as Mieville, get a chance to tout their beliefs rather than their fiction. A major reason I review many obscure books is an effort to unlock this treasure chest of literary genius compared to monetary complacency. 'Writing Rules I Like To Break' by Carol Emshwiller is particularly enlightening for the budding writer bogged down by perpetual rules.

The interviews are fantastic and informative discussions with Jeff VanderMeer (as the interviewer) with Dan Pearlman, Michael Moorcock (as the interviewer) with Barrington J. Bayley, and Paul Witcover (as the interviewer) with Tony Daniel.

The fiction is astounding. Stories include:

1) (All That Happens)Before The Epilogue by Andrew Fuller

2) Captain's Library by Zoran Zivkovic

3) Cogitor, Ergo Sum by Dan Pearlman

4) Dr. North's Wound by John Dodds

5) Gauntlet Of Gorgons by Rhys Hughes

6) Horrors By Waters by Jeffrey Ford

7) Lottery by Colin Brush

8) Love In Backspace by Barrington J. Bailey

9) Pandora's Bust by Rachel Pollack

10) Self Portraits by Aleksandar Gatalica

11) She Found Heaven by Nathan Ballingrud

12) Still Memories by Luis Filipe Silva

13) The Test by Joao Barreiros

Some of the stories are vague, some trippy (like the lovecraftian 'Dr. North's Wound'), some eclectic, and some even humorous (like 'Love In Backspace' where pilots use their hinders to steer through Backspace). One story is an excerpt of a larger piece ('Captain's Library'), and three are Flash Fiction ('Horror By Waters' (one singular, long sentence), 'Self Portraits', and 'Still Memories').

My favorites were 'Lottery', 'She Found Heaven', and 'The Test'. This collection from the FantasticMetropolis website holds something for everybody. If you like non-traditional SciFi/Fantasy or an interesting article related to the genre, then don't miss out on this treasure. Enjoy!
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Windows that needed to be broken Aug. 13 2004
By Matthew W Rossi - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Breaking Windows contains an article by Michael Moorcock discussing Mervyn Peake and his influence on fantastic fiction, and on Moorcock personally. It contains a list of fifty books in the SF and Fantasy tradition that China Mieville thinks any socialist should read. It contains 'Gauntlet of Gorgons', which in of itself means you should read it. I could try and dazzle you with verbosity here, but I won't: just consider that these are but three of the manifold delights the book offers. This is a whirlwind assault on the tedious, the trite and the painfully pedantic. You need to read it.
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