Briggen (Briggen Sci-Fi/Fantasy Trilogy Book 1) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 21.10
  • List Price: CDN$ 21.16
  • You Save: CDN$ 0.06
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Briggen has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Briggen Paperback – Apr 2008


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 21.10
CDN$ 21.10 CDN$ 14.60

2014 Books Gift Guide
Yes Please, the eagerly anticipated first book from Amy Poehler, the Golden Globe winning star of Parks and Recreation, is featured in our 2014 Books Gift Guide. More gift ideas


Product Details

  • Paperback: 484 pages
  • Publisher: Triad Publishing Group (April 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0981666191
  • ISBN-13: 978-0981666198
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.7 x 22.9 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 703 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
Briggen is a tale of ancient meets futuristic. It is a blending of old-world sorcery, mysticism and traditions, with a world of characters and technology along the lines of the Star Trek universe. I happen to be a really big fan of both. This is a very unique and well-told story about a long-lost prince who forfeited his royal place, a lonely orphan piloting a freighter carrying a rag-tag group of survivors searching for a home, plagued by insecurity that she will fail them, an evil sorceress who lusts for power, and enemy alien races single-mindedly laying waste to everything in their path. Their paths all intersect on the planet Mantasi, a world steeped in ancient traditions, simple ways, with a rich history, much of which has been lost to time, to betrayal, and battles long-ago fought. Heroes arise, villains take aim, and a fascinating world of magic unfolds.

My favorite aspect of Briggen is the main characters and their complex relationships with one another. They quickly and easily grew on me, I felt a real warmth for them, I enjoyed them and rooted for them. Ann B. Keller is a talented storyteller with a wonderful imagination. Briggen is a thoroughly enjoyable and highly entertaining novel that will please fantasy and sci-fi fans alike.

Rai Aren, co-author of Secret of the Sands
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 15 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
SiFi and Fanatsy Collide May 1 2008
By Yvonne Mason - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Briggen - the name conjures up dragons, space ships, other planets, and the need to turn the page.
Ann B. Keller has taken two genres and woven them into a beautiful story blended together in the way no other writer had been able to do. She has taken fantasy and blended it with Star Wars to bring together the hero known as BRIGGEN.
Briggen has banished himself to a world not his own to recover from the life he fled. His ship crashes on a planet filled with animals of a prehistoric world. He has adapted himself to this world like only he can.
The wizard Quinhelm arrives to take Briggen back to his world. Briggen's bother has been murdered. Quinhelm explains to Briggen he must return and claim the crown that was rightfully his. Briggen makes the decision to return only to avenge the death of his brother. Along the way, Briggen and Quinhlem cross paths with Telena who has her own cache of secrets.
Ms. Keller weaves a tale of wonder, fantasy and belief in her characters that I have not seen in a long time. As Briggen learns to work the food processor on the ship he has been transported to, one can see him punching all kinds of buttons to receive the food he wants. One can visualize his frustration as he places each discarded plate to the side and growls with hunger.
The reader not only sees but also feels the power of Briggen and Quinhelm as they combine their powers to keep the force shield of the disabled ship up so the wounded and non-wounded can be transported to their ship. One can see the bridge of the ship and the crew as they fight to save the crippled ship and themselves from the enemy. Ms. Keller puts her reader in that ship.
The ease in which Ms. Keller blends the two genres is seamless and one feels this is the way it should be. This novel is an absolute must read. It has many lessons of loyalty, friendship and commitment as well as being very entertaining.
I give this book five stars only because that is the highest I can go.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A tapestry of fiction that is unique May 15 2008
By Mary Menzel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
By alternately weaving threads of science fiction and fantasy, Ann B. Keller has created a tapestry of fiction that is unique and engrossing. From space battles and diverse races from many planets to medieval castles, dragons and wizards, "Briggen", the first book in a promised trilogy, has all the components that readers of these genres crave. In this story, Prince Briggen is brought back to his home planet after his brother's death to take leadership of his people only to find out that many different forces are working against him. He enlists the help of Telana, the good Sorceress, and Quinhelm, the wizard, in his quest. Ann B. Keller, using vivid descriptions without being long-winded and redundant, allows the reader to have a clear and stunning picture of everything being described. If you are an avid reader of fantasy and science fiction, then this book should be number one on your list of books to read.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
SciFi and Fantasy It doesn't get any better March 7 2009
By Yvonne Mason - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Briggen - the name conjures up dragons, space ships, other planets, and the need to turn the page.
Ann B. Keller has taken two genres and woven them into a beautiful story blended together in the way no other writer had been able to do. She has taken fantasy and blended it with Star Wars to bring together the hero known as BRIGGEN.
Briggen has banished himself to a world not his own to recover from the life he fled. His ship crashes on a planet filled with animals of a prehistoric world. He has adapted himself to this world like only he can.
The wizard Quinhelm arrives to take Briggen back to his world. Briggen's bother has been murdered. Quinhelm explains to Briggen he must return and claim the crown that was rightfully his. Briggen makes the decision to return only to avenge the death of his brother. Along the way, Briggen and Quinhlem cross paths with Telena who has her own cache of secrets.
Ms. Keller weaves a tale of wonder, fantasy and belief in her characters that I have not seen in a long time. As Briggen learns to work the food processor on the ship he has been transported to, one can see him punching all kinds of buttons to receive the food he wants. One can visualize his frustration as he places each discarded plate to the side and growls with hunger.
The reader not only sees but also feels the power of Briggen and Quinhelm as they combine their powers to keep the force shield of the disabled ship up so the wounded and non-wounded can be transported to their ship. One can see the bridge of the ship and the crew as they fight to save the crippled ship and themselves from the enemy. Ms. Keller puts her reader in that ship.
The ease in which Ms. Keller blends the two genres is seamless and one feels this is the way it should be. This novel is an absolute must read. It has many lessons of loyalty, friendship and commitment as well as being very entertaining.
I give this book five stars only because that is the highest I can go.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Breathtaking Awe is Result of Reading This Fantasy-Science-Fiction Mix March 7 2009
By Tyler R. Tichelaar - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Ann B. Keller's new novel "Briggen" has all the elements of a great science-fiction novel and a great fantasy novel combined. From the opening pages, I felt I had stepped into a world not unlike that of Conan the Barbarian or Tarzan but then the book alternated into science-fiction scenes worthy of Star Wars. Whatever great book and film series from the past you want to compare it to, the book successfully captures the reader's attention from the opening scene to the final page, and there are a lot of pages--476--yet I could not put "Briggen" down. I stayed up late on a Friday night to read it, then spent my entire Saturday finishing it without once feeling the need to take a break.

Briggen, the title character, is a prince of Neimus, who gave up his right to be king to his brother, Beckett. He then went into self-chosen exile on another planet where he lives as a type of barbarian, surviving by his wits and brawn and hunting big game for his meals. When the novel opens, Quinhelm the wizard appears to tell Briggen his brother has been murdered, so Briggen must return to rule his people. At first, Quinhelm does not reveal that darker forces are at work; an evil race, the Xandoth, are trying to take over the galaxy. Also, the nobles of Neimus will plot against Briggen if he returns to claim his throne. This information Briggen will learn as he travels home. Briggen is reluctant to return to his home planet and take on the role of king, but the journey becomes easier for him when he meets Telana, a strong woman and captain of her own ship, who is seeking to help her people in exile to find a new home. Telana has no idea about her own past, having been raised as an orphan, but Briggen soon has ideas for her future.

Fantasy elements are abundant in the novel. Neimus is a beautiful magical kingdom complete with a stunning palace. Besides the wizard Quinhelm, Briggen will find that Ephereon, the last of his dragon race, is there to help maintain Briggen's throne. The evil Sorceress of Endih has her own plans to destroy Briggen's kingdom. She uses her magical powers to create an army to fight against his people, and she uses her feminine wiles to seduce one of the allies to aid her. Quinhelm, Briggen, and Telana all have their own powers including telepathy and telekinesis. The fantasy elements not only give the reader a true sense of wonder, but the scenes where Telana learns about her true heritage from Ephereon are both moving and will resonate with readers, for who does not want to learn he is more than he seems? That is why fantasy and fairy tales still hold their appeal to us--they remind us we are capable of rising above the everyday--that we have self-worth, that at heart, we are all princes and princesses capable of achieving greatness. Keller uses this appealing aspect of fantasy to great advantage and readers will appreciate it.

I found the science-fiction scenes particularly refreshing. While Keller focuses on new technologies in the form of spaceships and even dangerous hologram games, what I most enjoyed is that she also shows a very human side to technology. Quinhelm transports himself from a spaceship to earth only to land on the edge of Briggen's fire; Briggen has to help him douse the flames that catch on his robe. Later, Briggen, not familiar with the latest technological developments aboard the spaceship, has difficulty operating the appliances in his room including a food processor. No matter how many times he tries to order the meal he wants, another meal is produced until he has several dinners he did not request. These scenes add humor to the novel without falling into slapstick or corniness, and they reveal the human side of the characters while adding to the sense of realism in the novel because the technology is not flawless.

Human is a curious word to use in reference to the novel. While the cover does not state the book will have sequels, "Briggen" is the first volume in a trilogy. Readers are given several hints in the novel about the bigger picture of this galaxy where the characters reside, but they are left wanting to know more about this fictional world. Keller, only in passing reference, lets us know it is the 25th century. Some of the characters are referred to as Frenchmen or Italians, and toward the end, we are informed that the characters are speaking English. I kept waiting for explanations of these references to life on Earth, although Earth itself was never mentioned. While the history of Neimus is told, it only dates back three centuries, not far enough in the past to link it to the twenty-first century we readers live in. I trust Keller will explain in future novels how humans--earthlings--have come to exist in this galaxy. I wanted an explanation, but I am willing to wait for the future novels. Keller's depictions of her fictional world and the hints that far more is yet to be told completely captured my curiosity. She has achieved the most important aspect of creating a fictional world, as E.M. Forster stated in "Aspects of the Novel"--"Expansion. That is the idea the novelist must cling to. Not completion. Not rounding off but opening out." Keller has achieved that goal magnificently, creating a world that leaves the reader in wonder and wanting to explore further in Keller's future books.

My only negative criticism of the book is the cover because it does not let the reader know the book is a trilogy and it deserves a far more enticing illustration--one that highlights a key scene from the novel and grabs a person right away, hinting at the adventure, enjoyment and awe to be found inside. An illustration like those that have adorned the covers of Edgar Rice Burroughs's Mars and Tarzan novels, something showing muscled warriors, fierce dragons, beautiful women, would have been suitable. The book is extremely visual--Keller never bores with details but her scenes are descriptive enough that they come vibrantly alive in the reader's mind as if watching a major motion picture. A few illustrations in the book and especially an enticing cover would have added to the book. I can only say "Don't judge a book by its cover" because "Briggen" is sure to be a favorite among readers for many years to come! I eagerly await the sequels.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Breathtaking Awe Result From Reading this Fantasy-Science Fiction Mix July 22 2008
By Tyler R. Tichelaar - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Ann B. Keller's new novel "Briggen" has all the elements of a great science-fiction novel and a great fantasy novel combined. From the opening pages, I felt I had stepped into a world not unlike that of Conan the Barbarian or Tarzan but then the book alternated into science-fiction scenes worthy of Star Wars. Whatever great book and film series from the past you want to compare it to, the book successfully captures the reader's attention from the opening scene to the final page, and there are a lot of pages--476--yet I could not put "Briggen" down. I stayed up late on a Friday night to read it, then spent my entire Saturday finishing it without once feeling the need to take a break.

Briggen, the title character, is a prince of Neimus, who gave up his right to be king to his brother, Beckett. He then went into self-chosen exile on another planet where he lives as a type of barbarian, surviving by his wits and brawn and hunting big game for his meals. When the novel opens, Quinhelm the wizard appears to tell Briggen his brother has been murdered, so Briggen must return to rule his people. At first, Quinhelm does not reveal that darker forces are at work; an evil race, the Xandoth, are trying to take over the galaxy. Also, the nobles of Neimus will plot against Briggen if he returns to claim his throne. This information Briggen will learn as he travels home. Briggen is reluctant to return to his home planet and take on the role of king, but the journey becomes easier for him when he meets Telana, a strong woman and captain of her own ship, who is seeking to help her people in exile to find a new home. Telana has no idea about her own past, having been raised as an orphan, but Briggen soon has ideas for her future.

Fantasy elements are abundant in the novel. Neimus is a beautiful magical kingdom complete with a stunning palace. Besides the wizard Quinhelm, Briggen will find that Ephereon, the last of his dragon race, is there to help maintain Briggen's throne. The evil Sorceress of Endih has her own plans to destroy Briggen's kingdom. She uses her magical powers to create an army to fight against his people, and she uses her feminine wiles to seduce one of the allies to aid her. Quinhelm, Briggen, and Telana all have their own powers including telepathy and telekinesis. The fantasy elements not only give the reader a true sense of wonder, but the scenes where Telana learns about her true heritage from Ephereon are both moving and will resonate with readers, for who does not want to learn he is more than he seems? That is why fantasy and fairy tales still hold their appeal to us--they remind us we are capable of rising above the everyday--that we have self-worth, that at heart, we are all princes and princesses capable of achieving greatness. Keller uses this appealing aspect of fantasy to great advantage and readers will appreciate it.

I found the science-fiction scenes particularly refreshing. While Keller focuses on new technologies in the form of spaceships and even dangerous hologram games, what I most enjoyed is that she also shows a very human side to technology. Quinhelm transports himself from a spaceship to earth only to land on the edge of Briggen's fire; Briggen has to help him douse the flames that catch on his robe. Later, Briggen, not familiar with the latest technological developments aboard the spaceship, has difficulty operating the appliances in his room including a food processor. No matter how many times he tries to order the meal he wants, another meal is produced until he has several dinners he did not request. These scenes add humor to the novel without falling into slapstick or corniness, and they reveal the human side of the characters while adding to the sense of realism in the novel because the technology is not flawless.

Human is a curious word to use in reference to the novel. While the cover does not state the book will have sequels, "Briggen" is the first volume in a trilogy. Readers are given several hints in the novel about the bigger picture of this galaxy where the characters reside, but they are left wanting to know more about this fictional world. Keller, only in passing reference, lets us know it is the 25th century. Some of the characters are referred to as Frenchmen or Italians, and toward the end, we are informed that the characters are speaking English. I kept waiting for explanations of these references to life on Earth, although Earth itself was never mentioned. While the history of Neimus is told, it only dates back three centuries, not far enough in the past to link it to the twenty-first century we readers live in. I trust Keller will explain in future novels how humans--earthlings--have come to exist in this galaxy. I wanted an explanation, but I am willing to wait for the future novels. Keller's depictions of her fictional world and the hints that far more is yet to be told completely captured my curiosity. She has achieved the most important aspect of creating a fictional world, as E.M. Forster stated in "Aspects of the Novel"--"Expansion. That is the idea the novelist must cling to. Not completion. Not rounding off but opening out." Keller has achieved that goal magnificently, creating a world that leaves the reader in wonder and wanting to explore further in Keller's future books.

My only negative criticism of the book is the cover because it does not let the reader know the book is a trilogy and it deserves a far more enticing illustration--one that highlights a key scene from the novel and grabs a person right away, hinting at the adventure, enjoyment and awe to be found inside. An illustration like those that have adorned the covers of Edgar Rice Burroughs's Mars and Tarzan novels, something showing muscled warriors, fierce dragons, beautiful women, would have been suitable. The book is extremely visual--Keller never bores with details but her scenes are descriptive enough that they come vibrantly alive in the reader's mind as if watching a major motion picture. A few illustrations in the book and especially an enticing cover would have added to the book. I can only say "Don't judge a book by its cover" because "Briggen" is sure to be a favorite among readers for many years to come! I eagerly await the sequels.

-- Tyler R. Tichelaar, Ph.D., author of The Marquette Trilogy


Feedback