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Brightest Day Darkest Night Hardcover – Dec 15 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Canada / Trade; Library edition edition (Dec 15 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0002259788
  • ISBN-13: 978-0002259781
  • Product Dimensions: 23.8 x 16.2 x 3.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 680 g
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,011,873 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

PRAISE FOR BRENDAN GRAHAM: 'Irish history is like a gold seam for historical novelists -- there to be mined. Occasionally a nuggest is produced and Graham's is one of those.' Ireland on Sunday 'The guy can write. Lyrical music. Musical prose.' Sunday Independent 'Posted for worldwide literary success. A gripping page-turner about one of the grossest stains on the British Empire.' Hotpress 'A remarkable and emotional odyssey which uses the great Irish famine and the subsequent diaspora as the subject matter for a novel of immense potency.' Irish Post 'This huge sweep of a novel will whisk you from Ireland to Australia and Canada.' Woman's Realm

About the Author

Born in County Tipperary in 1945, Brendan Graham ‘s debut novel ‘The Whitest Flower’ (Nov 1998), became a No.2 Bestseller in Ireland as well as attracting widespread international acclaim. Translated into a number of languages, it is also a required text at Boston’s Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the course ‘Women, Storytelling and Performance’.

His new novel ‘The Element of Fire’, a sequel to ‘The Whitest Flower’, was published in May 2001.

’She sang turned away from him, the notes curving along her spine, down her bare legs, singing themselves through the floorboards to where he lay.’

Brendan Graham ‘s songs have been recorded by a wide spectrum of artists. His most recent work an unaccompanied song in Irish, sung by ‘sean-nos’ singer Roisin Elsafty, was commissioned by the Irish Government for The National Botanic Gardens, Dublin, as part of the Ceol Reoite (Frozen Music) Millennial Project.

A former Irish Youth International at basketball and a recipient of the Lansing Bagnall Award for Business Studies in Western Australia, Brendan Graham returned to Ireland in 1973. He now lives in Dublin, where he is married with 5 daughters, and currently he is sometimes working on the third part of his trilogy for HarperCollins.

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Amazon.com: 1 review
Cry Your Heart Out Dec 18 2014
By Quentin Mark Holt - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I felt inspired to order this novel through a song on You Tube sung by Karen Matheson. This song was Crucán Na bPáiste. This song is a very serious tear jerker of the first magnitude. Even if you do not understand Gaelic, it is the kind of a song that makes you just want to hang your head over and cry your heart out. I love it! I looked up the title on Google and learned that it was written by Brendan Graham for Ellen, one of the characters in his novel, The Brightest Day, The Darkest Night. I then went straightway unto Amazon and ordered it from old England. From old England it very soon came. The story narrative was absolutely tragic throughout. It was about a small group of Irish Catholics who came to America during the 1850's and then were eventually trapped in the War Between The States. To relieve the pain I felt for these people, I would remind myself that they were not real but only fictional characters in a novel. Then the pain would return when I would remember from history that all these awful things actually did happen to other people who were real. The awful sense of tragedy that I picked up at Fredericksburg, Sharpsburg, Chancellorsville, The Wilderness, Gettysburg, Spotsylvania, and Harper's Ferry would come flooding back into my consciousness.

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