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Brit-Think, Ameri-Think: A Transatlantic Survival Guide, Revised Edition Paperback – Feb 25 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Revised edition (Feb. 25 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0142001341
  • ISBN-13: 978-0142001349
  • Product Dimensions: 19.7 x 13.1 x 1.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 141 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #506,903 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents


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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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By A Customer on Jan. 15 2004
Format: Paperback
This book has been updated and now reflects many modern cultural traits for comparison as well as new words to compare. It also compares attitudes to war and the Brit perception of the Amis' politics and vice versa.
The section on the differences in British/American humor is particularly funny but the entire book is humorous. Tongue-in-cheek but all from those 'grains of truth' we often fail to see in our own cultures.
I highly recommend it as a light read that'll make you smile in recognition and give you a few of those 'aha!' moments.
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Format: Paperback
As a Brit married to a Yank, I had to laugh at a few of the customer reviews below. Some people seemed to be very seriously expecting a guide about how to avoid horrible breaches of business etiquette. Just because it has 'Survival Guide' in the title..... lighten up!
Admittedly, it probably is a little dated. I was given my treasured, tattered copy a number of years ago by an Anglophile Yank, and laughed my head off at the very accurate observations. I suddenly understood why my American friends thought I had a 'poor self-image' - they take all that self-depracating humor seriously!
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Format: Paperback
This book by an American born woman who has been transplanted to Britain is a very enjoyable read. Her anecdotal style makes the information fun and fascinating, and her insights invaluable, though one must have a sense of humor about both cultures as she is very tongue-in-cheek. As opposed to most other books I've read on the subject that are almost strictly technical, Walmsley tells the readers in a very conversational style about many differences that wouldn't occur to most travelers - differences in attitude (about sex, gender issues, finance, etc.), values, customs, ettiquette and habits; and she may sometimes touch a little on why the discrepencies exist.
Because this is in no way a dictionary style book, she does not offer alternate words, phrases or technical info. Thus, as a supplement, I highly recommend "Divided by a Common Language" by Christopher Davies, who (as opposed to Walmsley) is a Brit who now lives in Florida.
All in all, a humorous, anecdotal insight into two very different cultures. Even though this may not be as technical as some travelers would prefer, the information is crucial for developing a truer understanding than is offered in any travel guide, so do not pass it over for the latter; buy it as well.
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By J. Remington on March 19 2003
Format: Paperback
This short, biting, tongue in cheek satire does not necessarily pick original targets: bad teeth, the royal family, food, clothing, temperature, sex, etc. This is no small matter as Walmsley gleeflully creates a super fast and light read highlighting the many differences existing on both sides of the pond. An American married to a Brit herself, Walmsley has experienced first hand all the dichotomous behaviors seperating us from our former landlords. My favorite chapter focuses on our respective perceptions and reactions to Death. In this particular chapter, Walmsley hits her target like a SAS (or SEAL) sniper.
This is not great literature, it is just simply plain fun as well as required reading for any true card carrying Anglophilic American patriot like myself. A pure harmless (and highly affordable!) way to spend an hour or pass the time on a transatlantic flight.
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Format: Paperback
Not very funny the first time. Not very accurate. Really out of date, cliched throughout. I tend to think that "humour" like this at the expense of others show that the author may be struggling for genuine content.
My advice - leave this one on the shelf!
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Format: Paperback
This book is funny -- it will provide laughs for the American expat or traveler who has spent a fair amount of time in Britain, who has seen the socks & sensible sandals combo, suffered through the self-deprecating humor, sipped a few too many sodas sans ice, watched sandwiches eaten with knife & fork, had "puddings" for dessert. Beyond the laugh factor, I'm not sure how useful it is. A casual traveler might be helped by the Brit-American dictionary in the front of the book ("chips = French fries, crisps = potato chips, biscuit = cookie, scone = biscuit," etc., but beyond that, I wouldn't rely on this as a "survival guide."
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Format: Paperback
This book is a humorous and mostly accurate comparison and contrast of the British and American cultures. It explores a wide array of the facets of our cultures, showing that George Bernard Shaw was right on the money when he said that the British and the Americans were two peoples divided by a common language.
The major problem with this book is that it is dated. A lot of references to the politics and pop culture of the Eighties, including Margaret Thatcher, Ronald and Nancy Reagan, the television shows "Dallas" and "Dynasty" and their characters and stars.
Other than this, a good book to have if you are interested in the cultural differences one finds across the Atlantic, but I'm not sure how reliable a cultural guide it would be if you were to travel today.
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