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How to Build a Business Rules Engine: Extending Application Functionality through Metadata Engineering Paperback – Oct 29 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 483 pages
  • Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann; 1 edition (Oct. 29 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1558609180
  • ISBN-13: 978-1558609181
  • Product Dimensions: 18.4 x 3 x 23.5 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 862 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #787,937 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Book Description

The first book for developers on the emerging and increasingly popular subject of business rules engines.

From the Back Cover

[shelving code] Data Management/Programming

Business rules engines can make organizations more agile by allowing them to manage diverse sets of operating rules, such as many different contracts for goods and services with different clients. For example, business rules engines can contain interfaces that allow users to define business rules to add specific functionality to software applications in order to take advantage of particular business arrangements. This enables organizations to overcome the barriers of time, money, and reliability that traditional programming approaches present when trying to include variable business situations within information systems. Rules engines can also speed software implementation, provide increased auditability, and ensure engineering compliance. The capacity to understand and manage business rules outside of the "black box" of program code can improve the overall quality of IT infrastructures.

How to Build a Business Rules Engine is the first book to provide a detailed roadmap, with examples, for building a business rules engine. Written from the author"s 12 years of experience building business rules functionality, this book covers the necessary background and concepts, as well as the specific steps needed to build a rules engine. The book describes not only the components that a rules engine must have, but also the organizational issues that may determine its success after it has been built and implemented.

Features
· The only book that demonstrates how to develop a business rules engine. Covers user requirements, data modeling, repository design, metadata engineering, and more.
· Includes conceptual overview chapters suitable for management-level readers, including general introduction, business justification, and development and implementation considerations.
· A sample application is used throughout the book to illustrate concepts. The code for the sample application is available online at http://www.bizrulesengines.com.

About the Author
Malcolm Chisholm holds an M.A. from the University of Oxford, and a Ph.D. from the University of Bristol. He has over 20 years of experience in information technology and 12 years building business rules engines. His expertise has allowed him to work in various industries focusing on systems development and data administration. Recently he has worked with the United Nations Development Program and Deloitte and Touche.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
"As noted in the Introduction, the term business rules means different things to different people." Read the first page
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mike Tarrani TOP 500 REVIEWER on March 6 2004
Format: Paperback
Although this book's title may lead you to believe it is solely about developing a business rules engine, it is much more. First, to answer the question that developers may want to know about the book - yes, there is code and it can be downloaded from the web site that supports the book. However, in my opinion, the real reason to buy this book is to gain a deeper understanding of the practical aspects of incorporating business rules into applications. Where books such as "Principles of the Business Rule Approach" (ISBN 0201788934) cover the subject well from the conceptual and systems analyst perspectives, this is the only book to approach business rules from a tools and integration perspective.
Topics range from data modeling to working with batch processes, and every relevant consideration in between. You'll find that the author heavily favors the use of reference data, which is no coincidence because he wrote, in my opinion, the definitive book on that topic as well - "Managing Reference Data in Enterprise Databases" (ISBN 1558606971). More importantly, though, is how thoroughly this book covers all issues associated with developing and implementing a business rules engine, especially with respect to enterprise data architectures and associated databases.
If you have mastered the concepts of business rules and are ready to implement them this book is the place to start.
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By Youssef LOUDIYI on Jan. 28 2005
Format: Paperback
Excellent book, very concret application, you can buy it even only to use the access application !
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
44 of 46 people found the following review helpful
Warning: Read before buying! Aug. 9 2005
By a software developer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As a C++ developer recently tasked to design a "rules-engine" for a real-time application, I purchased this book with the hope of discovering an alternative to a "true" rule-engine (i.e., one that utilizes rule chaining and a pattern matching algorithm).

Although this book does give a step-by-step description of how to implement a "rules-engine" using Microsoft Access and Visual Basic for Applications, there is absolutely no discussion of how a rules-engine could be implemented in any other development environment.

The relevant material in the book could easily be presented in about 200 pages or less. Rules are not really addressed until chapter 15. Most of the early chapters deal with such topics that are tangential at best. Just one chapter discussing the differences between the type of rule-engine described in the book and an expert system type of rule-engine would have made the book useful.
42 of 48 people found the following review helpful
Practical aspects of business rules March 6 2004
By Mike Tarrani - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Although this book's title may lead you to believe it is solely about developing a business rules engine, it is much more. First, to answer the question that developers may want to know about the book - yes, there is code and it can be downloaded from the web site that supports the book. However, in my opinion, the real reason to buy this book is to gain a deeper understanding of the practical aspects of incorporating business rules into applications. Where books such as "Principles of the Business Rule Approach" (ISBN 0201788934) cover the subject well from the conceptual and systems analyst perspectives, this is the only book to approach business rules from a tools and integration perspective.
Topics range from data modeling to working with batch processes, and every relevant consideration in between. You'll find that the author heavily favors the use of reference data, which is no coincidence because he wrote, in my opinion, the definitive book on that topic as well - "Managing Reference Data in Enterprise Databases" (ISBN 1558606971). More importantly, though, is how thoroughly this book covers all issues associated with developing and implementing a business rules engine, especially with respect to enterprise data architectures and associated databases.
If you have mastered the concepts of business rules and are ready to implement them this book is the place to start.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
excellent technology primer for this subject area March 23 2008
By K. Ambrose - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a database designer and programmer for over a decade, I had always wondered how a business rules engine might actually be implemented. What were the neccessary "parts"? What was the overall technology strategy for turning documented rules into executable actions? What might an interface need to look like, and what functionality would it need to offer to support a working business rules engine? All these questions are answered in this book. The implementation design provided (as working code in Microsoft Access and VBA) is not "enterprise" ready in the sense that is would support hundreds of users and tens of thousands of business rules. But it is a comprehensive "proof of concept" - with working code - that clearly addresses design and implementation strategies and methods required for these engines. This book has now surely given me more understanding about how these engines can work than probably anyone else has in my organization of over 1000 employees (that admittedly has never implemented this type of funtionality but may very well need to do so sometime in the future).

Prerequisites for understanding this tutorial would be sound understanding of relational database theory (what effective information processing systems do not require this understanding?), good basic understanding of conventional database development concepts, as well as understanding of typical data processing required for both interactive data entry and batch processing of data.
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
Disappointing Jan. 3 2007
By D. A. Frost - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
This book was very disappointing, for several reasons: Firstly, I find it hard to believe that with the author's supposed years of expertise in this area, he advocates the design approach that is contained in this book - an approach that seems to be at odds with modern commercially-available rules engines. Secondly, he then spends most of the book building a "rules engine" and most of the book seems to be a "how to build" manual for this piece of software, which I can't imagine anyone else ever using. I recommend that anyone interested in rules engines look elsewhere.
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Too confusing Sept. 28 2009
By Bond007 - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is more focused on business rules engine setup from a physical table design perspective. It fails to clearly elaborate on the modeling of the declarative structure of business rules as ERD and associated table structure. The approach outlined and the examples do not reflect the all categories of business rules. Also it is not clear from the sample application that is provided for download how different category of rules are designed and assembled for transactional working. In fact the sample rules implementation in the book is more associated with (physical) application screen design rather than organizational process logic; also, such implementation could have been more easily done through triggers in an enterprise class DBMS like Oracle than desktop DBMS like Access which lacks such capability.


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