Building Embedded Linux Systems and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.

Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Building Embedded Linux Systems on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Building Embedded Linux Systems [Paperback]

Karim Yaghmour
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)

Available from these sellers.


Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $21.57  
Paperback --  
Save Up to 90% on Textbooks
Hit the books in Amazon.ca's Textbook Store and save up to 90% on used textbooks and 35% on new textbooks. Learn more.
There is a newer edition of this item:
Building Embedded Linux Systems Building Embedded Linux Systems 3.5 out of 5 stars (2)
CDN$ 49.88
In Stock.
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

May 2 2003 059600222X 978-0596002220 1

Linux® is being adopted by an increasing number of embedded systems developers, who have been won over by its sophisticated scheduling and networking, its cost-free license, its open development model, and the support offered by rich and powerful programming tools. While there is a great deal of hype surrounding the use of Linux in embedded systems, there is not a lot of practical information. Building Embedded Linux Systems is the first in-depth, hard-core guide to putting together an embedded system based on the Linux kernel. This indispensable book features arcane and previously undocumented procedures for:

  • Building your own GNU development toolchain
  • Using an efficient embedded development framework
  • Selecting, configuring, building, and installing a target-specific kernel
  • Creating a complete target root filesystem
  • Setting up, manipulating, and using solid-state storage devices
  • Installing and configuring a bootloader for the target
  • Cross-compiling a slew of utilities and packages
  • Debugging your embedded system using a plethora of tools and techniques
Details are provided for various target architectures and hardware configurations, including a thorough review of Linux's support for embedded hardware. All explanations rely on the use of open source and free software packages. By presenting how to build the operating system components from pristine sources and how to find more documentation or help, this book greatly simplifies the task of keeping complete control over one's embedded operating system, whether it be for technical or sound financial reasons.Author Karim Yaghmour, a well-known designer and speaker who is responsible for the Linux Trace Toolkit, starts by discussing the strengths and weaknesses of Linux as an embedded operating system. Licensing issues are included, followed by a discussion of the basics of building embedded Linux systems. The configuration, setup, and use of over forty different open source and free software packages commonly used in embedded Linux systems are also covered. uClibc, BusyBox, U-Boot, OpenSSH, thttpd, tftp, strace, and gdb are among the packages discussed.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

Review

"The lessons learnt using this book alongside systems such as the IPAQ will certainly pay off." - Martin Howse, LinuxUser & Developer, issue 31 "This book should be essential reading for embedded system designers at all levels of experience who intend to use Linux in current or future projects. The only other thing you need is an internet connection to download the source code of components that are used." Industrial Networking & Open Control, June 2003

About the Author

Karim Yaghmour is the founder and president of Opersys Inc. (http://www.opersys.com), a company providing expertise and courses on the use of open source and free software in embedded systems. Being himself an active member of the open source and free software community, Karim has firmly established Opersys's services around the core values of knowledge sharing and technical quality promoted by this community. As part of his community involvement, Karim is the maintainer of the Linux Trace Toolkit and the author of a series of white-papers that led to the implementation of the Adeos nanokernel, which allows multiple operating systems to exist side-by-side. Karim's quest for understanding how things work started at a very young age when he took it upon himself to break open all the radios and cassette players he could lay his hands on in order to "fix" them. Very early, he developed a keen interest in operating system internals and embedded systems. He now holds a B.Eng. and an M.A.Sc. from the cole Polytechnique de Montral. While everyone was hacking away at Linux, Karim even took a detour to write his own distributed micro-kernel in order to get to the bottom of operating system design and implementation. When not working on software, Karim indulges in his passion for history, philosophy, sociology, and humanities in general. He's especially addicted to essays and novels by Umberto Eco and Gerald Messadi.


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Building Embedded LINUX Systems (review) May 2 2004
Format:Paperback
I am (and have been since October) in the midst of new hardware bring up. I am not a LINUX novice but performing a kernel bring up -- well let's just say I assembled a number of books in preparation of the project.
Forturnately for me, this book was one I selected.
I found the text to be be thorough (w/plenty of references to other texts, also by O'Reilly) starting with the general and moving on to specifics.
I like the order of the presentations. Often times I find the next chapter the next task confronting me.
Good Job Mr. Yaghmour!!!
You saved me a lot of pain.
Well worth the money.
Warrick Lacey
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars A very valuable resource June 13 2003
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
Entering the world of embedded Linux development was a daunting task not too long ago, since information was spread thinnly across the web, and books were not readily available. Several books have appeared recently, and a couple are ok, but this book is the most thorough available to date. It covers all important aspects of the development process, from concepts to debugging, with toolchain building, the kernel, bootloaders, networking and root file systems in between. I would highly recommend this book. It has been extremely helpful to me.
Was this review helpful to you?
5.0 out of 5 stars A Practical book Sept. 9 2003
Format:Paperback
This book is a good starting point for people to understand the work of embedded linux engineers in the real world. It is also a great book for experienced people in the industry as they can collect various pieces of missing information. I just wish I had this book two years back when I learnt all this stuff the hardway through pieces of information on web. Technology changes fast, but the stuff mentioned in the book is still up to date in the industry.
Was this review helpful to you?
Format:Paperback
Even if you already have development tools, this text is helpful for administering an embedded Linux device, or for locating applications/daemons to run on an embedd Linux device. This text deals with different architectures, like ARM etc.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  22 reviews
40 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very valuable resource June 13 2003
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Entering the world of embedded Linux development was a daunting task not too long ago, since information was spread thinnly across the web, and books were not readily available. Several books have appeared recently, and a couple are ok, but this book is the most thorough available to date. It covers all important aspects of the development process, from concepts to debugging, with toolchain building, the kernel, bootloaders, networking and root file systems in between. I would highly recommend this book. It has been extremely helpful to me.
23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Building Embedded LINUX Systems (review) May 2 2004
By Warrick Lacey - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I am (and have been since October) in the midst of new hardware bring up. I am not a LINUX novice but performing a kernel bring up -- well let's just say I assembled a number of books in preparation of the project.
Forturnately for me, this book was one I selected.
I found the text to be be thorough (w/plenty of references to other texts, also by O'Reilly) starting with the general and moving on to specifics.
I like the order of the presentations. Often times I find the next chapter the next task confronting me.
Good Job Mr. Yaghmour!!!
You saved me a lot of pain.
Well worth the money.
Warrick Lacey
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Practical book Sept. 9 2003
By Arun Kalluri - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
This book is a good starting point for people to understand the work of embedded linux engineers in the real world. It is also a great book for experienced people in the industry as they can collect various pieces of missing information. I just wish I had this book two years back when I learnt all this stuff the hardway through pieces of information on web. Technology changes fast, but the stuff mentioned in the book is still up to date in the industry.
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great primer on Embedded linux Nov. 4 2004
By Mark D. Lucia - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I found this book a "must read" if you are even thinking about embedded linux. Karim's discussions about flash devices and files systems is information you could spend weeks aquiring else where.
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Building Embedded Linux Systems Jan. 26 2006
By njbulitka - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I found this book to give a well-rounded discussion of (as the title says) building embedded LINUX systems. The author does a good job presenting the material and nicely presents concepts that non-experts can quickly grasp. The book covers: basic concepts, hardware support, development tools, kernel considerations, and file management topics. It also covers bootloader, networking, and debugging tools. I would have preferred more coverage on the debugging tools. Yaghmour did a good job in explaining his ideas. I did not need to refer to other LINUX books to have terminology explained. Chapter 7 was particularly insightful in its discussion of memory storage (flash) devices.

The book is very practical (hand's on) in its approach. I recommend it highly for the person developing embedded LINUX systems. I don't think that you'll be disappointed.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback