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Burglar Who Thought He Was Bogart Mass Market Paperback – Jun 24 1996


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Onyx (MM) (June 24 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451186346
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451186348
  • Product Dimensions: 17 x 10.9 x 2.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 181 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)


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First Sentence
At a quarter after ten on the last Wednesday in May, I put a beautiful woman in a taxi and watched her ride out of my life, or at least out of my neighborhood. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Knowing the writer's very good reputation and popularity as a mystery writer was probably a disadvantage in reading this book. This book was a dissapointment. I soon tired of the device of weaving the Bogart film festival into the far-fetched mystery. Glad when I got to the end. No more Burglar books.
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By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 11 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Lawrence Block is one of our most talented mystery authors. In the Bernie Rhodenbarr series he explores how an ordinary, but intelligent, "honest" person might go about pursuing a life of crime as a fastidious and talented burglar who isn't proud of what he does, doesn't like to hang out with criminals, and really gets a big thrill out of breaking and entering . . . and removing valuables. As you can see, there's a sitcom set-up to provide lots of humor. But the humor works well in part because Mr. Block is able to put the reader in the Bernie's shoes while he breaks, enters and steals . . . and evades the long arm of the law. To balance the "honest" burglar is an array of "dishonest" and equally easy-money loving cops. As a result, you're in a funny moral never-never land while your stomach tightens and your arm muscles twitch as tension builds. To make matters even more topsy-turvy, Bernie at some point in every story turns into an investigator who must figure out "who-dun-it" for some crime that he personally didn't do. It's almost like one of those "mystery at home" games where the victim comes back as the police investigator, playing two roles. Very nice!
So much for explaining the concept of the series. The Burglar Who Thought He Was Bogart is the seventh book in the series. I strongly suggest that you begin the series by reading Burglars Can't Be Choosers and follow it up with The Burglar in the Closet, The Burglar Who Studied Spinoza, The Burglar Who Liked to Quote Kipling, The Burglar Who Painted Like Mondrian and The Burglar Who Traded Ted Williams. Each story in the series adds information and characters in a way that will reduce your pleasure of the others if read out of order.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
If you want a light-hearted mystery full of intellectual stimulation, check out the burglar series. This excellent addition puts our hero into an Eastern European conspiracy to re-carve maps that might not have been settled right after World War I. Bernie is never seriously in danger, and the police are not about to arrest him, but nevertheless, he feels compelled to solve the puzzle, if only for the sake of the the mysterious Ilona. Bernie assembles the suspects into his bookstore for a showdown reminiscent of Nero Wolfe in his top form.
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By John G. Hilliard on April 11 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
It takes a lot of time (or it seams that way) to get through this book. I do not know what slowed me down more, the disjointed writing or the plot that seamed to just be thrown together. I only made it about half way into the book. I thought there was going to be a mystery here somewhere - maybe that is the mystery. I got to think after awhile that the author was leaving out about every third sentence, it just made that little sense. There are many better books out there.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Meet Bernie Rhodenbarr, burglar extra-ordinary. This isn't your
ordinary burglar, however. He is a man who steals only the best:
jewelry, coin collections, works of art and-if it's lying around
in large enough bills-money. But don't worry; he won't bother
most of us. He steals only from the rich, for, "the poor, God
love 'em, have nothing worth taking."
But burglary is only a sideline for Bernie; he also owns a
bookstore, and in there he meets the most interesting people.
Thus one morning he sells a book to Hugh Candlemas, who then asks
him to enter an expensive East Side apartment (after hours, of
course), and "borrow" a stock portfolio, which the two of them
would then split.
Normally Bernie doesn't like partners, but he agrees. But then
events take a rather sinister turn. While he is casing the joint,
he is interrupted by the owner and his girlfriend and is forced
to hide in a closet. When they leave, the portfolio is gone, too.
And when he tries to call Hugh to tell him what had happened, a
stranger answers the phone!
Bernie might just chalk it all off as a bad day, but a couple of
weeks later he is approached by detective Ray Kirshmann. It seems
that Mr. Candlemas has turned up dead-and that the police have
found an empty briefcase in the apartment with his prints!
Bernie's troubles are just beginning, though. He soon realizes
that he is merely a pawn in an international game, and the stakes
are much greater than the money he had thought to gain. In fact,
if he's not careful, his life may be part of the game.
But Lawrence Block's The Burglar Who Thought He Was Bogart is
more than an entertaining mystery.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is certainly not the best book in the Bernie Rhodenbarr series, but it is still entertaining in the way I expect from Block. Bernie is back with his wisecracking and his lockpicking, this time with a convoluted plot involving Humphrey Bogart movies and an attempted country called Anatruria. But it's all really unimportant, and the main clue, the word "caphob," turns out to be the key to the solution but in a really obscure way.
It's really too complicated for its own good, and Block has definitely done better, but I would read another Burglar book for the reason anyone reads a series novel, for the main character and the regular supporting cast: Carolyn, the lesbian dog groomer; and Ray, the ubiquitous policeman. Oh, yes, and Raffles, hard-working, toilet-using feline about town.
The Bogart references are fun, too, especially for a film fan.
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