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Burke & Hare (Remastered Edition) [Blu-ray]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Derren Nesbitt, Harry Andrews, Glynn Edwards
  • Directors: Vernon Sewell
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • MPAA Rating: UNRATED
  • Studio: Kino Lorber films
  • Release Date: July 17 2012
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • ASIN: B007UQ8IP6
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #73,545 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

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Burke & Hare (Remastered Edition) [Blu-ray]

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Format: Blu-ray
BURKE & HARE [1972] [Blu-ray] [UK Release] The Pimps and the Prostitutes and the Body-Snatchers! The Brothels and Dens of iniquity!

Vernon Sewell [‘The Blood Beast Terror’] directs this Hammeresque horror on the early days of anatomy, when the need for fresh corpses led to a series of murders in Edinburgh.

When the villainous grave robbers Burke and Hare realise that demand for corpses is outstripping supply, they decide to take matters into their own hands and prey on drunken prostitutes in the brothels and alleyways of Victorian Edinburgh. Derren Nesbit, Glynn Edwards, Yootha Joyce and Francoise Pascal star in this seminal British shocker. Extras include interviews with cast and crew members, Françoise Pascal and Derren Nesbitt.

FILM FACT: The eponymous theme song, which opens and closes the film, was written by Roger Webb with lyrics by Norman Newell and performed by the English comedy/musical trio The Scaffold.

Cast: Derren Nesbitt, Harry Andrews, Glynn Edwards, Yootha Joyce, Françoise Pascal, Yutte Stensgaard, Robin Hawdon, Alan Tucker, Dee Shenderey, Joan Carol, Paul Greaves, David Pugh, James Hayter, Thomas Heathcote and Duncan Lamont

Director: Vernon Sewell

Producer: Guido Coen

Screenplay: Ernle Bradford

Composer: Roger Webb

Cinematography: Desmond Dickinson

Video Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1

Audio: English: 2.0 LPMC Audio Stereo

Subtitles: None

Running Time: 94 minutes

Region: All Regions

Number of discs: 1

Studio: Odeon Entertainment

Andrew’s Blu-ray Review: A dark comedy thriller about the infamous 19th century body snatchers.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 17 reviews
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Two Very Different Movies Rolled Into One. Oct. 1 2014
By Chip Kaufmann - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Like so many early 1970s British horror movies, I first saw BURKE & HARE at a drive-in as part of a double or triple bill. I don't remember what else was showing that night but this was the movie that I came to see and it wasn't the first feature on the program. I knew director Vernon Sewell from two earlier films, THE CRIMSON CULT and THE BLOOD BEAST TERROR (both 1968) and from being mentioned in David Pirie's landmark study of British horror cinema, A HERITAGE OF HORROR. Neither of the two movies I mentioned were particularly good but they were entertaining and well made and boasted powerhouse horror casts (Peter Cushing, Robert Flemyng, Christopher Lee, Barbara Steele, Michael Gough, and Boris Karloff). This one didn't have the cast but it was about Burke & Hare.

I am fascinated by the Burke & Hare saga. Though he was hanged in 1829 Burke's skeleton, along with a calling card case made from his skin, is still on display in Edinburgh. I am also a huge admirer of John Gilling's 1959 version of the story THE FLESH & THE FIENDS. I have all 5 of the major cinematic versions of the story and this one is by far and away the weakest of the set which is too bad because there was real potential here. The problem is that the producers wanted to have their cake and eat it too. They combined a horror movie with a period sex romp in the vein of FANNY HILL. The bordello scenes look like a completely different movie. The lighting is different, the music is cheerful, and the editing between the two storylines is very haphazard. This is really too bad because the B & H scenes are well staged and well acted by Derren Nesbit & Glynn Edwards. Yootha Joyce and Dee Shenderey are also very good as the women behind the men. Harry Andrews looks the part of Dr. Knox but lacks the depth of Peter Cushing's characterization but then he doesn't appear to be trying.

I suspect that director Sewell envisioned a different film altogether as this lacks the tight editing of his other movies. What he thought of BURKE & HARE is probably best summarized by the fact that he quit the business after this one. Producer Kenneth Shipman, taking advantage of the new relaxed standards, made sure that there was plenty of female flesh on display including Yuute Stensgaard's (she had been in Hammer's LUST FOR A VAMPIRE the year before). Throw in a little kinky behavior witnessed through peepholes and you have what looks like a spread for PLAYBOY magazine (or maybe it's PENTHOUSE since they're British). I can't really recommend the film except for B & H completists (LOL) but this Redemption DVD looks gorgeous and there's even a Blu-Ray edition for those so inclined. John Landis obviously borrowed the film's overall comic tone for his 2010 BURKE & HARE with Simon Pegg and Andy Serkis.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Flawed and Unclassifiable British Rarity Feb. 8 2013
By William Amazzini - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
Throughout the seventies, many British studios tried to compete with Hammer Films in the Horror genre output and few succeeded. Here we have a rare British title , Director Vernon Sewell's 'BURKE AND HARE'- 1972, which received limited distribution in the states and appeared in mom and pop video stores in the eighties via a muddy VHS transfer. The story of grave robbers doing murderous business with surgeons in 1800's Edinburgh had been filmed many times before and because it was the seventies , this version contains dark and crude sexual humor taking place in brothels and pubs making it hard to classify it as a Horror film or an exploitation comedy. It is peppered with many familiar British actors : Harry Andrews as Dr. Knox who seems to be slumming it, the always excellent Derren Nesbitt in a front and center role for once , an unrecognizable Yootha Joyce as Burke's Sweeney Todd/Mrs. Lovett-like unpleasant wife, and as the gorgeous brothel trollops ,Francoise Pascal and a blink or you'll miss cameo by Yutte Stensgaard who played Mircalla/Millarca Karnstein in Director Jimmy Sangster's 'LUST FOR A VAMPIRE'- 1970 who gave that role an underrated performance. Director Sewell directs the proceedings in a straight forward manner having come off the set of the much better guilty pleasure 'THE BLOOD BEAST TERROR' aka 'THE VAMPIRE BEAST CRAVES BLOOD'-1971 also available from Redemption Films in Blu-Ray or DVD. The Blu-Ray is a nice clear transfer in its correct 1.66 aspect ratio showing off the production design giving a you are there feel to the dirty alleyways and interior hovels enhancing the crisp cinematography by Desmond Dickinson although the negative fluctuates with bluish blemishes and brownish tones. The music score by Roger Webb is average but the main and end titles has an annoying theme song sung by a group called 'THE SCAFFOLD'. Extras include a featurette called 'GRAVE DESIRES:CORPSES ON FILM' ; a wonderful interview with actress Francoise Pascal who seemed to enjoy the shoot and trailers to this film plus other Redemption British titles. For those who want to see more of this type of material, scope out Director John Gilling's stylish 'THE FLESH AND THE FIENDS' aka 'MANIA' -1961 with Peter Cushing in the Dr. Knox role which may be the definitive version of the material and also Director Freddie Francis's intense work 'THE DOCTOR AND THE DEVILS'- 1985 with Timothy Dalton as Dr. Knox. Of course, Director Robert Wise's 'THE BODY SNATCHER' -1945 should be mentioned with the 'BURKE AND HARE' characters hovering over the proceedings of actor Henry Daniel as the good Dr. MacFarlane and the ultimate Boris Karloff performance :Cab man Grey. For British Horror completists only, it is an offbeat piece of British history come to life and should be much better if not for the seesawing of Benny Hill like humor and serious horror making the viewing of 'BURKE AND HARE' a frustrating experience.
BURKE & HARE [1972] [Blu-ray] [UK Release] July 4 2015
By Andrew C. Miller - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray
BURKE & HARE [1972] [Blu-ray] [UK Release] The Pimps and the Prostitutes and the Body-Snatchers! The Brothels and Dens of iniquity!

Vernon Sewell [‘The Blood Beast Terror’] directs this Hammeresque horror on the early days of anatomy, when the need for fresh corpses led to a series of murders in Edinburgh.

When the villainous grave robbers Burke and Hare realise that demand for corpses is outstripping supply, they decide to take matters into their own hands and prey on drunken prostitutes in the brothels and alleyways of Victorian Edinburgh. Derren Nesbit, Glynn Edwards, Yootha Joyce and Francoise Pascal star in this seminal British shocker. Extras include interviews with cast and crew members, Françoise Pascal and Derren Nesbitt.

FILM FACT: The eponymous theme song, which opens and closes the film, was written by Roger Webb with lyrics by Norman Newell and performed by the English comedy/musical trio The Scaffold.

Cast: Derren Nesbitt, Harry Andrews, Glynn Edwards, Yootha Joyce, Françoise Pascal, Yutte Stensgaard, Robin Hawdon, Alan Tucker, Dee Shenderey, Joan Carol, Paul Greaves, David Pugh, James Hayter, Thomas Heathcote and Duncan Lamont

Director: Vernon Sewell

Producer: Guido Coen

Screenplay: Ernle Bradford

Composer: Roger Webb

Cinematography: Desmond Dickinson

Video Resolution: 1080p

Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1

Audio: English: 2.0 LPMC Audio Stereo

Subtitles: None

Running Time: 94 minutes

Region: All Regions

Number of discs: 1

Studio: Odeon Entertainment

Andrew’s Blu-ray Review: A dark comedy thriller about the infamous 19th century body snatchers. In 19th-century Edinburgh, Irish rogues Burke [Derren Nesbitt] and Hare [Glynn Edwards], discover there’s money to be made supplying fresh corpses to noted College of Surgeons anatomist Dr. Robert Knox [Harry Andrews]. But when demand starts outstripping supply, they decide to take matters into their own hands and prey on drunken prostitutes and vagabonds…

In Edinburgh, Scotland during the period of November, 1827 to October, 1828, the duo of William Burke and William Hare murdered 17 victims, selling the corpses to Dr. Robert Knox for medical dissection. These notorious real-life events would later be referenced in Robert Louis Stevenson's short story, "The Body Snatcher," which inspired a 1945 film of the same name with Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi. The murders were then adapted for a 1948 British film to be titled “Crimes of Burke and Hare,” but censorship lead to some major changes, and the film was released as ‘THE GREED OF WILLIAM HART’ starring Tod Slaughter.

Burke [Derren Nesbitt] and Hare [Glynn Edwards] run an old men's boarding house with their lazy wives (statuesque Dee Shenderey and Yootha Joyce, the original “Mrs. Roper” on the British comedy ‘Man About the House’). The notion of lining their pockets with extra money leads Burke and Hare to the backdoor of the medical university where Dr. Knox [Harry Andrews] lectures, as they sell him the body of a lodger who had just passed on. Seeing that Dr. Knox pays well for fresh cadavers, when another border becomes sickly, instead of bringing him to a hospital, Burke and Hare snuff him out themselves, and again make an easy profit. This quickly becomes too much of a good thing, as the duo perfects a way of suffocating victims and in fact just about any poor soul who comes into contact with them, or that they suspect no one in the village will miss. Their wives are at first suspicious about where all the money is coming from, but the realization is that their greed makes them favourable of their husbands' homicidal ways of earning a decent living.

This is a saucy humorous British sitcom-styled black humour shenanigan in this 1972 British period horror yarn. In retelling the story of the infamous Burke and Hare murders that took place in Edinburgh in 1828, and directed by Vernon Sewell.

Harry Andrews gives a terrifically over the top performance as the medical pioneer Dr. Knox, and enjoying himself as a bullish obsessive, while gleefully carving up the cadavers while turning a blind eye to their provenance, Burke and Hare are played strictly for laughs and their thick ‘Oirish’ accents, is quite acceptable and should not be taken too serious. But instead of pulling birds, they are instead henpecked husbands of their shrewish wives, who are played by Dee Shenderey and Yootha Joyce (who was married to Glynn Edwards until their divorce in 1968), who think nothing of killing anyone for ‘a wee dram,’ but also stumble onto a very lucrative business, which their wives encourages them.

The comedy thriller’s side-story, which involves three medical students and a local brothel, is a sort of awkward mix of slapstick and whodunit, especially when Alan Tucker, the young medical student, falls in the love with Marie [Françoise Pascal] in the brothel, but after Marie does not turn up the next day for an appointment, goes in search of missing the missing Marie. Yutte Stensgaard (who once guested in ‘On The Buses’ British Comedy Series) also mysteriously disappears, but it’s not clear if she ended up as another victim or just got left on the cutting room floor. One minute she’s there, the next she’s gone.

Shot at Twickenham Film Studios, the art director on the film was Scott MacGregor, who also worked on a number of early 1970s Hammer films and here does a nice job of re-creating the poverty stricken streets and brothel houses of 19th century Edinburgh. Nesbitt and Edwards have pretty good chemistry as Burke and Hare, and even though at times their characters seemed to be played light and making them more likable, especially Burke if that’s possible, they have several horrific scenes, such as when they ambush the passed-out Daft Jamie [David Pugh] in the dark, intent on snuffing him out. Although Harry Andrews is a fine actor, his rendition of Dr. Knox (who is introduced telling a tasteless dinner table joke about a man’s inadequate nether regions.

One of the biggest reasons to seek out and indulge in ‘Burke & Hare’ is the presence of Yutte Stensgaard, the Hammer Horror starlet best known for her underrated performance in ‘Lust For A Vampire,’ and along with actress Françoise Pascal (as Marie, the doomed prostitute who ends up as one of Dr. Knox’s subjects) and several others, but Yutte Stensgaard shows off her beautiful figure by doing several topless scenes, and unlike in ‘Lust For A Vampire,’ we get to hear her real voice. Speaking of Hammer Horror, a number of character actors associated with the horror specialists can be seen in small parts, including Duncan Lamont, James Hayter, Robin Hawdon, Katya Wyeth and Caron Gardner. Long-time Benny Hill sidekick Bob Todd plays a policeman, with his trademark bald scalp covered by a hat. Also, the theme song is by The Scaffold of "Lily the Pink" fame, which sounds more like Chas and Dave: why sing a song about this famous Scottish crime spree in a Cockney accent? Particularly when they're from Liverpool?

‘Burke & Hare’ is a bawdy retelling of Scotland’s most affable serial killers, William Burke and William Hare. The film has a very playful rowdy tone to it, with fairly distanced horror. It’s all fairly low-brow stuff, but keeps the pace up throughout the film, but is definitely aiming squarely for the Hammer Horror crowd. But despite all the very negative reviews of this film especially, I really enjoyed and glad I now have it my Blu-ray Collection, as I never saw it when it was released in the cinema.

Blu-ray Video Quality – The film has a very nice clean 1.66:1 aspect ratio with a much improved 1080p encoded transfer, compared to the Redemption Blu-ray release. Although for some unknown reason there appears to be at times a sliver hard matte on the left side of the frame and a minuscular one on the left of the frame, which appears to the edge of the film gate, its width changing from shot-to-shot. The image is nice and sharp and the colour is extremely good and clean. Sadly there is no subtitle options.

Blu-ray Audio Quality – The 94-minute, All Region encoded disc offers decent 2.0 LPMC Audio Stereo only and it is also very decent, but nothing amazing, but very pleasant, especially as you can hear all the dialogue of the actors, especially compared to the Redemption Blu-ray release.

Blu-ray Special Features and Extras:

Special Feature: Françoise Pascal on ‘Burke & Hare’ [2015] [1080p] [16:9] [6:52] We find Françoise Pascal sitting in front of the camera in her lounge and tells us that she was 17 years of age when she appeared in ‘Burke & Hare.’ Françoise tells us about the first film she appeared in that was entitled ‘Loving Feeling’ and was told to take all her clothes off, but refused, as she was worried her mother would see her in that film, but someone took her to a pub and plied her with two brandies and after that couldn’t of cared less and did the scene as the director wanted. Françoise says that she loved ‘Burke & Hare’ as well as the director Vernon Swell. The part of the film where she falls in love with the actor Alan Tucker thought he was a lovely man also and enjoyed his company. When it came to the part of the film when the Brothel catches fire, Françoise was the actress that helped all the people to escape, but at one point the fire was extremely close to her and thought she was going to get burnt and it was a very frightening experience. When the film was finally released in 1972 Françoise was actually involved in a real fire experience in her flat in Belgrave Square in London and had to jump into the Square from three floors up and the funniest thing Françoise comments about the film, especially one critic said about her performance in the film, saying “Ms. Pascal is better off dead than alive” and Françoise agreed with that comment and even though she loved the film, but felt she was not that good in the film, because it was her very first lead role in that film and it was very scary, because she didn’t have proper direction in the film what so ever. Today Françoise tells us she loves Horror films and the more frightening they are the better she loves them and never gets cared anymore watching them, suddenly Françoise turns towards the camera and says, “Please get me in a Horror film.” And so ends a really nice intimate filmed special, especially with a very nice lady and looks and sounds like a bundle of fun and is well worth a view. The interview was conducted by Simon Sheridan, author of “Keeping The British End Up.”

Special Feature: The End of a Fine Body . . . of work: The Making of Vernon Sewell’s Final Film ‘Burke & Hare’ [2015] [1080p] [16:9] [31:48] Here we get a very exclusive interviews with several contributors and we start off with Derren Nesbitt, who tells us that Kenneth Shipman [1930 – 1996] was a very good friend of his and owned Twickenham Studios, which was the original site of a former ice-rink, St. Margaret’s Studios that was set up in 1913 by Dr. Ralph Jupp. Derren Nesbitt has made a couple of films with Vernon Sewell, who originally was a sound man at Gainsborough Studios that was originally a British film studio based on the south bank of the Regent's Canal, in Poole Street, Hoxton in the former Metropolitan Borough of Shoreditch, London and were active between 1924 and 1951. Derren Nesbitt informs us that he was very much involved with ‘Burke & Hare’ in particular in the screenplay and also directed some of the scenes, and had a really great time involved with the film, as Vernon Sewell treated him with respect. After that we get introduced to Ray Corbett [1st Assistant Director] who was also involved with ‘Burke & Hare.’ Next we are introduced to Dee Shipman [Mrs. Burke] who informs us that her Father-in-Law bought certain Film Studios that included Riverside Studios is a production studio, theatre and independent cinema on the banks of the River Thames in Hammersmith, London and Twickenham Film Studios from the famous British Actor Jack Buchanan [2 April 1891 – 20 October 1957] who also had a chain of cinemas, who sadly passed away before Dee Shipman had a chance to meet him. Dee Shipman also informs us that Al Shipman who started the Proms at the Royal Albert Hall with Sir Henry Wood. Dee also tells us that apart from appearing in ‘Burke & Hare,’ Dee was also involved with behind-the-scenes, especially organising the Christmas Parties, which usually had about 2,000 guests, but also helped out as a hostess. Dee Shipman tells us some interesting facts on certain actors that was going to be in ‘Burke & Hare’ and Diana Dors was going to be Mrs. Burke and for Mr. Burke they were going to cast Alan Lake [who was an English actor, best known as the third husband of Diana Dors] but because of some serious problems, he was dropped, so Dereen Nesbit was chosen, because at the time he was in a very popular British TV series. So because Dina Dors was dropped, Dee Shipman felt that the part of Mrs. Burke would be so ideal part for her, but when shooting started Dee had a very high temperature and also had a very rough sore voice and Vernon Sewell though the voice was ideal, but Dee was determined to get better and lose the rough voice. Dee also informs us that there was a lot of conflict between Derren and Vernon on particularly with the camera work. We also find out that while ‘Burke & hare’ was being shot, in another part of Twickenham Film Studios, Sam Peckinpah was shooting ‘Straw Dogs’ and there was total mayhem going on and they reckon that Vernon Sewell was even more inspired to make ‘Burke & hare’ more gruesome. We are also informed that ‘Burk & Hare’ was not a Horror film, but more like a Black Comedy, and Derren Nesbit tells us he loved that type of film, as he loved adding bits of comedy into the film. They all praised Harry Andrews and also said he was a wonderful gentleman and also praised him for being a great Shakespearian actor, but because he was a tall man, they asked him not to wear his shoes, but every time he took off his shoes, he couldn’t remember his lines, so he insisted on keeping his shoes on. They mention about Yootha Joyce and didn’t realise she was an alcoholic, as she was very disciplined actress, but they were all shocked when Yootha Joyce died of alcohol poisoning. Derren Nesbit tells us that he appeared in films with Tony Curtiss and Frank Sinatra and loved the fact that they would both only do two takes and he loved that about those actors. He also said working on stage was okay, but after a year he didn’t like it, as he liked spontaneity, which is why he prefers and loves making films. So ends another a very interesting special and it was great hearing all the contributors extolling the virtues of making the film ‘Burke & Hare,’ but of course seeing the film clips throughout this special, sadly time has been very cruel to the two main actors Derren Nesbitt and Dee Shipman. Despite this, it is still a brilliant special and is a very nice bonus to watch.

Original Theatrical Trailer [1972] [1080p] [1.66:1] [3:10]

Odeon Entertainment Classic Movie Previews: Here you get Promotional Trailers of other Odeon Entertainment Blu-ray releases and they are as follows:

The Black Torment [1964] [480i/1080p] [4:3/1.66:1] [2:25] What we get with the first part of the trailer is a really rough 4:3 image quality, but then about half way through you get an announcement stating “Clip from our restored version of the film” and what an amazing massive improvement and Odeon Entertainment have done a stunning sterling job.

Blood On Satan’s Claw [1971] [480i/1080p] [4:3/1.66:1] [2:34] What we get with the first part of the trailer is a really rough 4:3 image quality, but then about half way through you get an announcement stating “Clip from our restored version of the film” and what an amazing massive improvement and Odeon Entertainment have done a stunning sterling job.

The Blood Beast Terror [1968] [480i/1080p] [4:3/1.66:1] [4:08] What we get with the first part of the trailer is a really rough 4:3 image quality, but then about half way through you get an announcement stating “Clip from our restored version of the film” and what an amazing massive improvement and Odeon Entertainment have done a stunning sterling job.

Witchfinder General [1968] [1080i/1080p] [1.66:1] [4:20] What we get with the first part of the trailer is a really rough 1.66:1 image quality, but then about half way through you get an announcement stating “Clip from our restored version of the film” and what an amazing massive improvement and Odeon Entertainment have done a stunning sterling job.

Finally, Vernon Sewell's final film, 'Burke & Hare,' is a quirky horror history loosely based on the real life Burke and Hare serial murders. With strong performances throughout, the wonderfully grim tale splendidly demonstrates the filmmaker's talent for balancing a controversial subject matter with a good deal of humour and appeal. Highly Recommended!

Andrew C. Miller – Your Ultimate No.1 Film Fan
Le Cinema Paradiso
WARE, United Kingdom
Carry On Graverobbing Oct. 24 2014
By M2 - Published on Amazon.com
I went into this film expecting some real early 70s British trash, along the lines of "Virgin Witch" or "Horror Hospital" (which is delightful trash, but trash). Instead I found a faintly serious, highly droll take on the Burke and Hare story, that may be the best acted rubbish film of its decade. The cast ranges from Royal Shakespeare Company staple Harry Andrews to Benny Hill stooge Bob Todd, but everyone is uniformly good. Derren Nesbitt plays a somewhat naive Burke, while Glynn Edwards channels Robert Newton as Long John Silver as Hare. Their scenes together are terrific. Harry Andrews plays Dr. Knox, and he gives it his all, even though the film was probably nothing more than a bit of lolly to augment his lower-paying stage work. Director Vernon Sewell, nobody's candidate for great British filmmaker, does very well here, emphasizing the humor without totally burlesquing things. And somehow, the inane rock theme song fits perfectly. If you are expecting a thoughtful treatise on the historic Burke and Hare, you'd better look elsewhere. But if you want a freewheeling, historical melodrama that has some genuinely funny moments and a lot of boobies thrown in for good measure, this is the ticket. Think Hammer meets Tom Jones.
I recommend it wholeheartedly April 10 2015
By C. S. Petersen - Published on Amazon.com
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Highly entertaining, and bizarrely directed. Basically it is paced and cued as though it was a comedy, but all the events are the actual terrifying dark happenings of Burke & Hare. It's utterly weird to hear a "boinnnng" musical note when someone is being hideously murdered.

Lots of topless action and simulated vigorous (and often very amusing sex) if that floats your boat, but in standard British style almost no gore. Plenty of murders, however.

Despite this, I recommend it wholeheartedly. Actually of all the numerous Burke & Hare versions & knock-offs I've seen, this is my second favorite, even surpassing the Peter Cushing take in Flesh & the Fiends. The best, of course, is still Val Lewton's The Body Snatchers, which is a Boris Karloff showcase and also has Bela Lugosi (though in only a small role).

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