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Bury Your Dead Paperback – Apr 12 2011


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Bury Your Dead + The Brutal Telling + The Murder Stone
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown (April 12 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0751544442
  • ISBN-13: 978-0751544442
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 3 x 19.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 381 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #7,406 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Quill & Quire

When I last reviewed a Louise Penny novel in these pages (2009’s The Brutal Telling), I wondered how much longer she could spin stories of murder in her chosen setting of the cloistered, tight-knit Eastern Townships village of Three Pines, Quebec – how many local killers could be protected, then unmasked? Bury Your Dead is an admirable attempt to expand the author’s storytelling horizons. In the novel, Penny’s delightful, world-weary detective, Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, questions every assumption he’s ever made in the process of coming to grips with a “terrible, terrible mistake.”

Several storylines emerge, diverge, then converge. Gamache is supposed to be on holiday with his wife in Quebec City, but gets mixed up in a perplexing and brutal killing in the Literary and Historical Society Library, a library devoted to the history of the city’s English-speaking citizens. As the plot thickens, Gamache begins to suspect that the Three Pines scion he fingered as the murderer in Penny’s previous outing is in fact innocent, and that the real culprit got away with the crime.

Penny’s plot is complicated, and much of Bury Your Dead’s middle section drags because the reader is forced to work too hard to piece everything together. But the action picks up splendidly in the novel’s final pages, as both the community of Three Pines and Gamache himself come to terms with their culpability in convicting an innocent man. Revisiting (and revising) the climax of such a recent novel is an audacious move on Penny’s part, and it works well.

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

'Very powerful - Penny's best book to date . . . A stunner—Stephen Booth

The author brings the intriguing story to life using ornate descriptions—Star Magazine

Louise Penny writes like an angel and plots like the devil. Bury Your Dead had me on tenterhooks from the first page to the last—Alan Bradley

Bury Your Dead has two intelligent plots and, as a bonus, you get to know a bit of Canadian history—The Times

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Marjorie Tucker on June 11 2010
Format: Hardcover
Short review: It's an incredible book and I am very lucky that I had access to an Advanced Reader's Copy. You, gentle reader, would enjoy it most if you read the first five books in the Three Pines mystery series as they all build in terms of character and story to make the experience far more rich and rewarding.

And a longer (if you wnat to keep reading) version: My love affair with the books of Louise Penny began two years ago when I read the first of her Three Pines mysteries, "Still Life". I have read a lot of mysteries (including 120 in the last three years) and Louise Penny has become one of my favorite writers. All of the mysteries I read have their fair share of good and evil, usually a corpse or two and someone searching for the answers.

In Louise's world, her people are so complex and fascinating (beginning with the Surete's Armand Gamache) that you wish you could move into the small Canadian village of Three Pines and join them for a cup of cafe au lait and a croissant. So what if people seem to die there (of unnatural causes) at a higher per capita rate than almost anywhere else! It's a world of good friends and great food and challenging weather, of art and poetry and greed and mayhem and undercurrents. So many wonderful undercurrents. Penny does not underestimate the readers' intelligence and for that we can be grateful. This newest book, "Bury Your Dead" takes you to several locations throughout Canada, but her skill in tying it all back to Three Pines and the residents there is wonderful. I have no desire to spoil any of the storyline(s) for you, so I will just say that if you like your reading to include sly wit, heartbreaking emotions and a deep understanding of what makes us human, this is the book (and series) for you. Enjoy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Marjorie Tucker on June 11 2010
Short review: It's an incredible book and I am very lucky that I had access to an Advanced Reader's Copy. You, gentle reader, would enjoy it most if you read the first five books in the Three Pines mystery series as they all build in terms of character and story to make the experience far more rich and rewarding.

And a longer (if you wnat to keep reading) version: My love affair with the books of Louise Penny began two years ago when I read the first of her Three Pines mysteries, "Still Life". I have read a lot of mysteries (including 120 in the last three years) and Louise Penny has become one of my favorite writers. All of the mysteries I read have their fair share of good and evil, usually a corpse or two and someone searching for the answers.

In Louise's world, her people are so complex and fascinating (beginning with the Surete's Armand Gamache) that you wish you could move into the small Canadian village of Three Pines and join them for a cup of cafe au lait and a croissant. So what if people seem to die there (of unnatural causes) at a higher per capita rate than almost anywhere else! It's a world of good friends and great food and challenging weather, of art and poetry and greed and mayhem and undercurrents. So many wonderful undercurrents. Penny does not underestimate the readers' intelligence and for that we can be grateful. This newest book, "Bury Your Dead" takes you to several locations throughout Canada, but her skill in tying it all back to Three Pines and the residents there is wonderful. I have no desire to spoil any of the storyline(s) for you, so I will just say that if you like your reading to include sly wit, heartbreaking emotions and a deep understanding of what makes us human, this is the book (and series) for you. Enjoy.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
and names too remember. I would recommend this book to people who are interested in the history of Quebec and
the separatist movement.
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Format: Audio CD
The eagerly awaited sixth Armand Gamache tale by the remarkable Louise Penny has just arrived and I'm all ears ' literally because it is read by the award winning voice performer Ralph Cosham. Having narrated all titles in this sterling series Cosham is a standard bearer for voice performance, perfectly reflecting with tone, nuance, and anticipatory pause the sophisticated, complex mystery unfolding before us.

Moving easily from The Brutal Telling, Penny's last in this series, we find Chief Inspector Gamache on leave, time taken to recover from what he considers to be an unforgivably wrong decision. It is Winter Carnival in Quebec city, and Gamache seeks solitude in the quietude of the Literary and Historical society. However, there is little peace as a determined historian who had sought the body of the founder of Quebec, Samuel de Champlain, meets an unexpected and violent end. Gamache, fearing an escalation of tensions between the English and French immediately becomes involved. Yet, he cannot help but wonder what the 400 year old grave of Champlain could possibly reveal that would cause someone to commit murder.

Meanwhile, another murder has taken place in the village of Three Pines, and Bistro owner, Olivier, has been convicted of the killing. Gamache's associate, Beauvvoir, is asking questions of the village's residents to determine whether or not anyone else had a motive for this murder.

Could the past and the present possibly be interrelated? With rich descriptions of Quebec and a fascinating story line Penny once again captures us. Yet another triumph for this author and narrator.

' Enjoy!

- Gail Cooke
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