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Business and Production: A GameDev.net Collection Paperback – Jan 9 2009


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About the Author

Drew Sikora started programming with QBasic back in 1996 as just another means to geek out with his dad's laptop, but quickly became hooked on creating text-based RPGs and seeking after information to learn more about creating games like the ones he played every day on his PC and Nintendo console. Information back then on game development wasn't anywhere near readily available like it is now, and he was finally able to vent his frustration of that fact years later when he had accrued enough experience by publishing articles on GameDev.net starting back in 2000, when books were slightly more plentiful on the shelves and the internet was slowly coming together as a means of readily-accessible knowledge. Continuing his quest to imbue others with knowledge, he's published over one hundred articles, interviews and event coverage pieces, as well as three contributions to Game Design Perspectives. Promoted to Executive Producer of GameDev.net in 2006, he strives to continue the site's long legacy of community and information sharing. At the same time, he advises the local IGDA chapter he founded back in 2001, speaks at local events, judges the student challenges over at GameInstitute, lurks and moderates on numerous development forums, experiments on small personal game projects under the guise of Blade Edge Software, and coaches gymnastics.

John Hattan has been working steadily in the casual game-space since the TRS-80 days and professionally since 1990. After seeing his small-format games turned down for what turned out to be Tandy's last PC release, he took them independent, eventually releasing them as several discount game-packs through a couple of publishers. The packs are actually still available on store-shelves, although you'll need a keen eye to find them nowadays. He continues to work in the casual game-space as an independent developer, largely working on games in Flash for his website, The Code Zone (www.thecodezone.com). His current scheme is to distribute his games virally on various web-portals and widget platforms. In addition, John writes weekly product reviews and blogs (over ten years old) for www.gamedev.net from his home office where he lives with his wife and daughter in their home in the woods near Lake Grapevine in Texas.

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Amazon.com: 1 review
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Great book. Dec 29 2010
By Steven - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have gone 1/2 way through this book and it has been great so far.

This book details on how to actually manage a game whether alone or with a team. It has pointers on how to bring together a team for a game and have it not fall apart. Also on how to sell it, publishing to a publisher, advertise, etc. It has very good points on project management that you should read so that your game doesn't go down the drain. It's the business side of the game, even if you don't plan on going business with your game you still need business to be successful (unless you made it only for yourself or a select few), well for production also. After reading some sections, I soon realized why my "big" game project flopped.

The book is thin so it will be a quicker read, but it's contents so far are good.

Be warned however, since this is a collection of articles, topics will jump and will not have continuity but generally they are placed together in a well manner. I expected this when I bought it and encouraged it since usually things become stale when written by a single person.


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