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Byte Wars: The Impact of September 11 on Information Technology Paperback – Mar 22 2002


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Paperback, Mar 22 2002
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall; 1 edition (March 22 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0130477257
  • ISBN-13: 978-0130477255
  • Product Dimensions: 1.8 x 15.1 x 22.7 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 431 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #2,931,796 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Customer Reviews

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By A Customer on Nov. 14 2003
Format: Paperback
A few years back, Ed was so hard up for cash that he wrote a book called "Time Bomb 2000!" in which he predicted the end of civilization. This silly prophecy only served to expose Yourdon for the fly-by-night, fast-talking, hourly-rate, con artist that he is. In other words, Ed completely undermined his reputation with every CIO in the industry.
My guess is that, on 1/1/2000, Ed was hunkering down in his survival retreat, drinking his bottled water, and wondering where in god's name his credibility went.
Given that his career as an oracle was cut short, Ed decided that he'd stop predicting the future and start cashing out on the 9/11 mania. Just like any talk show host or stand up comedian, Ed found ample material to make a few bucks off of the hysteria. He demonstrated the kind of initiative that would make Jeraldo Rivera proud.
The goal of this book is to keep Ed's name in circulation, so that he can charge a few more dollars for his worthless consulting services. Perhaps he'll use the royalties to refinish his deck or replace the transmission in his aging sports car. Ed's not going to tell you anything you don't already know, he's just going to make you think he will (which is the trick he uses to get you to buy it).
This leads me to think that I need to write Ed a letter...
Dear Ed,
Hello there little trooper. Isn't time for someone to pack it up and call it a career? Wouldn't the whole industry benefit if you took your fat, wrinkled, mug out of the public eye.
You pretty much admitted, in DeathMarch, that structured analysis was a crock. Face it, old man, you're over the hill. You've got no good ideas left. You're so desperate for ideas that you're reprinting Deathmarch. What are you going to do next time, reprint Time Bomb 2000!
Read more ›
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By A Customer on Sept. 22 2002
Format: Paperback
I paid ... for this worthless beatup. There is little new
thought in it, and almost no depth. The main thread running
through it is that September 11th changed all of the rules and
a secondary thread is that Ed had finally twigged to the fact
that many other races and nationalities don't like the style
business practices and methods of the US of A.
Well Ed, September 11th didn't alter ANY rules of computer
security, it just moved security to a brighter location
in the CEO's firmanent and most third worlders have loathed
the USA for as long as I've been on the planet. They've just
got a lot more effective in expressing that feeling lately.
I can honestly say I expected a book with some technical
appreciation of the problem and some working methods for
bypassing and sidelining mid-level managers whose major
worry is the number of fly-buys they've racked up for
the month.
If you're looking for answers or technical tips on Infowar
don't spend your money on this ... book, its a yaaaawwwwnnn!
Regards,
Sherro.
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By A Customer on April 24 2002
Format: Paperback
Ed Yourdon's most well-known recent work is probably TimeBomb 2000, a book that inspired so much unwarranted fear that one terrified couple on his Internet forum attempted to give away their newborn grandchild to complete strangers in hopes that it would survive the terrible Y2K rollover. Indeed, Yourdon himself was quoted as saying that the likelihood that the various Y2K "trigger dates" would pass without incident was equal to that of pigs learning to fly.
Thankfully, Byte Wars avoids such ridiculous predictions and hysteria, but instead offers the reader no new insights into information technology and little to nothing relating to 9/11. Yourdon is a true Master of the Obvious in this book, which apparently capitalizes on the 9/11 tragedy without actually addressing it. If you're looking for real insight into the effects of 9/11 on the IT industry, I would wait a few more months for a more relevant work. This one just doesn't cut it.
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Format: Paperback
The subtitle of this book is a trifle misleading: Byte Wars is about a great deal more than the impact of September 11 on information technology. It is indeed as it proclaims, but covers a far wider scope. In Byte Wars, Ed Yourdon examines the myriad strategic shifts, trends, and paradigm changes not necessarily caused by Sept 11th, but trends that were already underway and have been changed or accelerated by the war on terrorism.

The author speaks directly to the reader in his typically confident tone, but the voice this time is more sober. There is not much of the typical humor we expect from Ed Yourdon, he is clearly shaken and sobered, like most of us, by the horrific events of Sept. 11th. Indeed, the first sentence, "This is not a book I expected to write" is a harbinger of much of the book's the sobering matter.
The structure of the book is straightforward: It begins with an overview of the broad changes which will profoundly affect industrialized and developing countries. This introduction is followed by more specific, detailed chapters about major aspects of IT and thoughtful predictions of sweeping changes to come in the areas of security, risk management, emergent systems, resilient systems, good enough systems, and death-march projects. A note about the "Death-March" chapter--it may suffice as an introduction to this topic for the general reader, and provides a timely update on the topic for readers of Mr. Yourdon's earlier book by the same title.
This is an important book-particularly for IT professional and those directly affected by the IT industry. I highly recommended Byte Wars for this audience as well as general business readers and thoughtful readers of the general public.
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