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C# in a Nutshell Paperback – Mar 11 2002


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Paperback, Mar 11 2002
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 864 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (March 11 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596001819
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596001810
  • Product Dimensions: 22.6 x 15.5 x 4.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 1 Kg
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,277,784 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Format: Paperback
This book is not a "teach yourself C#"; it is only a reference text. If you are experienced in another programming language, however, you can use this reference to easily find the syntax required by C#. The book is a quick reference useful for programmers who like to have a paper copy reference on their desktops. By the publisher's own admission, it is not an exhausted reference.
I like having a hard copy reference when I'm programming, so this book suits me fine. There are numerous example code snippets throughout the book to help you learn C#. In addition, the second edition also adds a CD that allows you to incorporate the book's Quick Reference directly into the help files of Visual Studio .NET. This gives you, the programmer, more options when you need help. It is also handy when you have left the book at home.
I'm an intermediate Java programmer who needed to make the conversion to C# for a particular project. "C# in a Nutshell" has assisted me in this aim, and as a result, I would recommend this book to anyone as a useful reference text.
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Format: Paperback
In my opinion O'reilly continually puts out the best technical books and "C# in a Nutshell" further supports their excellent reputation. As usual with O'reilly's other offerings in their "in a Nutshell" series they leave out the fluff and provide just the facts. This approach makes "C# in a Nutshell" easy to recommend if you've already gotten your feet wet in C#. On the other hand if you're still green you're better off with books that offer a traditional tutorial approach and then come back when you're ready to get into some advanced topics or need a reference to the namespaces and C# implementation.
Understanding this book is not a tutorial for the beginner will help acclimate yourself to what to expect. Even though the subtitle reads "A Desktop Reference" ample content exists to introduce beginning topics that lay the ground work for its reference sections.
The first nineteen chapters, approximately two hundred and nineteen pages, cover beginning topics such as .NET Framework and C# basics to advanced subjects including reflection, XML serialization, and threading. The remaining chapters are devoted to a quick reference to classes in the namespaces. Several topics that I'm interested in, including GDI+ were mentioned only briefly and then referred to related namespaces. I'm hoping that GDI+ and other UI related material are covered in more depth in O'reilly's ".NET Windows Forms in a Nutshell" offering or the next edition of "C# in a Nutshell".

Code examples in the book were sufficient to reinforce my understanding of each topic and the 'animal tracks' notes were a nice touch and more than mere filler. Other niceties include UML diagrams detailing the namespace structures, DLL / namespace associations, and the C# API Quick Reference encapsulated in a Visual Studio.
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By wiredweird on Nov. 11 2003
Format: Paperback
When I need to learn a language, the last thing I want is a book that tries to teach it to me. Their teaching jut gets in the way of my learning.
This book serves my needs ideally. It is a reference, not a tutorial. It covers the whole language and most or all of the standard API, in a book of modest length. Of course, that sacrifices detail. Fine. When I need information, I'll look here to find out what system facility does my job, then use the system help for details. This book really is the index that the help system lacks.
This goes on the shelf next to Flanagan's "Java in a Nutshell." I have no higher praise for a language book.
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Format: Paperback
The Nutshell series published by the O'Reilly group has become so ubiquitous in the IT world that it needs very little introduction. As the preface of C# in a Nutshell states, the aim of the series is to become the desktop reference for whatever technology is covered by each book. In this case, O'Reilly aims to make this book the must-have reference for all C# programmers. This review will focus on the points that any good reference book should address, namely: brevity, completeness, correctness, and usefulness. Unfortunately, my own personal knowledge of C# is restricted to what was discussed in .NET Essentials (another O'Reilly publication), so I won't be able to be as critical of the correctness as I would like. My conclusions are thus based on short tests that I ran to check the validity of the claims made in the book.
C# in a Nutshell scores high marks in both the brevity and correctness categories. Humorous as it might be to label an 830-page book as brief, it actually qualifies as such. The main discussion of the language is kept to the first 270 pages, with an average of about 20 pages devoted to each subject. Only the essentials are discussed, and that will usually be enough when you need to quickly look up how to do something. The remaining 560 pages are devoted to a Quick Reference of the .NET framework classes. While reading the text, I never came across any glaring inconsistencies, such as conflicting descriptions of how to accomplish a task, which leads me to suspect that the text is mostly correct. The few actual tests I ran worked as expected. On a superficial level, I found the content credible.
When it came to completeness, I wasn't as impressed. As a reader, I have somewhat of a personal bias: I'm pretty familiar with both C++ and Java.
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