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C++ Primer Paperback – Aug 1989


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 478 pages
  • Publisher: Longman Higher Education (August 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0201164876
  • ISBN-13: 978-0201164879
  • Product Dimensions: 23.4 x 15.7 x 2.3 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 544 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,167,149 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

From the Inside Flap

C# is a new language invented at Microsoft and introduced with Visual Studio.NET. More than a million lines of C# code already have gone into the implementation of the .NET class framework. This book covers the C# language and its use in programming the .NET class framework, illustrating application domains such as ASP.NET and XML.

My general strategy in presenting the material is to introduce a programming task and then walk through one or two implementations, introducing language features or aspects of the class framework as they prove useful. The goal is to demonstrate how to use the language and class framework to solve problems rather than simply to list language features and the class framework API.

Learning C# is a two-step process: learning the details of the C# language and then becoming familiar with the .NET class framework. This two-step process is reflected in the organization of this text.

In the first step we walk through the language--both its mechanisms, such as class and interface inheritance and delegates, and its underlying concepts, such as its unified type system, reference versus value types, boxing, and so on. This step is covered in the first four chapters.

The second step is to become familiar with the .NET class framework, in particular with Windows and Web programming and the support for XML. This is the focus of the second half of the book.

Working your way through the text should jump-start your C# programming skills. In addition, you'll become familiar with a good swatch of the .NET class framework.

Mail can be sent to me directly at slippman@objectwrite.com.

Organization of the Book

The book is organized into eight relatively long chapters. The first four chapters focus on the C# language, looking at the built-in language features, the class mechanism, class inheritance, and interface inheritance. The second four chapters explore the various library domains supported within the .NET class framework.

Chapter 1 covers the basic language, as well as some of the fundamental classes provided within the class framework. The discussion is driven by the design of a small program. Concepts such as namespaces, exception handling, and the unified type system are introduced.

Chapter 2 covers the fundamentals of building classes. We look at access permission, distinguish between const and readonly members, and cover specialized methods such as indexers and properties. We walk through the different strategies of member initialization, as well as the rules for operator overloading and conversion operators. We look at the delegate type, which serves as a kind of universal pointer to a function.

Chapters 3 and 4 cover, in turn, class and interface inheritance. Class inheritance allows us to define a family of specialized types that override a generic interface, such as an abstract WebRequest base class and a protocol-specific HttpWebRequest subtype. Interface inheritance, on the other hand, allows us to provide a common service or shared attribute for otherwise unrelated types. For example, the IDisposable interface frees resources. Classes holding database connections or window handles are both likely to implement IDisposable, although they are otherwise unrelated.

Chapter 5 provides a wide-ranging tour of the .NET class library. We look at input and output, including file and directory manipulation, regular expressions, sockets and thread programming, the WebRequest and WebResponse class hierarchies, a brief introduction to ADO.NET and establishing database connections, and the use of XML.

Chapters 6 and 7 cover, in turn, drag-and-drop Windows Forms and Web Forms development. Chapter 7 focuses on ASP.NET, and the Web page life cycle. Both chapters provide lots of examples of using the prebuilt controls and attaching event handlers for user interaction.

The final chapter provides a programmer's introduction to the .NET Common Language Runtime. It focuses on assemblies, type reflection, and attributes, and concludes with a brief look at the underlying intermediate language that is the compilation target of all .NET languages.

Written for Programmers

The book does not assume that you know C++, Visual Basic, or Java. But it does assume that you have programmed in some language. So, for example, I don't assume that you know the exact syntax of the C# foreach loop statement, but I do assume that you know what a loop is. Although I will illustrate how to invoke a function in C#, I assume you know what I mean when I say we "invoke a function." This text does not require previous knowledge of object-oriented programming or of the earlier versions of ASP and ADO.

Some people--some very bright people--argue that under .NET, the programming language is secondary to the underlying Common Language Runtime (CLR) upon which the languages float like the continents on tectonic plates. I don't agree. Language is how we express ourselves, and the choice of one's language affects the design of our programs. The underlying assumption of this book is that C# is the preferred language for .NET programming.

The book is organized into eight relatively long chapters. The first set of four chapters focuses on the C# language, looking at the built-in language features, the class mechanism, class inheritance, and interface inheritance. The second set of four chapters explores the various library domains supported within the .NET class framework, such as regular expressions, threading, sockets, Windows Forms, ASP.NET, and the Common Language Runtime.

Lexical Conventions

Type names, objects, and keywords are set off in Courier font, as in int, a predefined language type; Console, a class defined in the framework; maxCount, an object defined either as a data member or as a local object within a function; and foreach, one of the predefined loop statements. Function names are followed by an empty pair of parentheses, as in WriteLine(). The first introduction of a concept, such as garbage collection or data encapsulation, is highlighted in italics. These conventions are intended to make the text more readable.

Resources

The richest documentation that you will be returning to time and again is the Visual Studio.NET documentation. The .NET framework reference is essential to doing any sort of C#/.NET programming.

Another rich source of information about .NET consists of the featured articles and columns in the MSDN Magazine. I'm always impressed by what I find in each issue.Currently, most of their writing has appeared only as articles in MSDN Magazine.Here is the collection of books that I have referenced or found helpful:

  • Active Server Pages+, by Richard Anderson, Alex Homer, Rob Howard, and Dave Sussman, Wrox Press, Birmingham, England, 2000.
  • C# Essentials, by Ben Albahari, Peter Drayton, and Brad Merrill, O'Reilly, Cambridge, MA, 2001.
  • C# Programming, by Burton Harvey, Simon Robinson, Julian Templeman, and Karli Watson, Wrox Press, Birmingham, England, 2000.
  • Essential XML: Beyond Markup, by Don Box, Aaron Skonnard, and John Lam, Addison-Wesley, Boston, 2000.
  • Microsoft C# Language Specifications, Microsoft Press, Redmond, WA, 2001.
  • A Programmer's Introduction to C#, 2nd Edition, by Eric Gunnerson, Apress, Berkeley, CA, 2001. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

Using his famous primer format, best-selling author Stan Lippman now brings you an indispensable guide to C#. C# PRIMER is a comprehensive, example-driven introduction to this new object-oriented programming language.

C# is a cornerstone of Microsoft's new .NET platform. Inheriting many features from both Java™ and C++, C# is destined to become the high-level programming language of choice for building high-performance Windows® and Web applications and components--from XML-based Web services to middle-tier business objects and system-level applications.

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:
  • Coverage of fundamentals, such as namespaces, exception handling, and the unified type system
  • Detailed explanations and examples of both class and interface inheritance, including a discussion of when each is appropriate
  • A wide-ranging tour of the .NET class library, including an introduction to ADO.NET, establishing database connections, regular expressions, threading, sockets programming, XML programming using the firehose and DOM parser models, XSLT, and XPATH
  • Detailed discussion of ASP.NET Web Form Designer, walking through the page life cycle and caching, and providing a large number of examples
  • Introduction to .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR)

Adding C# to your toolbox will not only improve your Web-based programming ability, it will increase your productivity. C# PRIMER provides a solid foundation to build upon and a refreshingly unbiased voice on Microsoft's vehicle to effective and efficient Web-based programming.



0201729555B07102002 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback
I expected very little from this book. The cover has very little shelf presence and is, frankly, quite ugly, IMHO. I guess you should never judge a book by its cover.
First the bad. If you come into this book expecting a real primer, from the dictionary definition of the word, you will be disappointed. While this book does cover the basics, the methodology is almost too strange to help someone first learning the language. If you want to learn C# from scratch, I think there are better books.
Having said that, there is a lot to love in this tome. Lippman has a strong grasp of what true programming is about and starts from the very beginning. While most of the revelations are hidden gems, the content is absolutely astounding, if you actually dig for the diamonds.
Want an example? Where else will you find an example as deep as this:
string usage = @"this is a verbatim string
the carriage return will be included in the string"
The style is a lot different than other books on the market, which may lead some to shoot this book down. I had the same reaction in the first couple of pages, but quickly changed my mind as I found more and more info that you cannot find anywhere else. As someone who purchases a lot of books (I consider programming a career, not a job), I appreciate every little nugget I get from each book, as, I hope, you do too.
Lippman's idea is to show a program and then run through different iterations, showing you a bit more with each turn. This is contrary to the typical, explain first and then show code, methodology, so it will most likely have you off guard at first. But, if you give it a go, the system works.
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By Grrr on Feb. 7 2002
Format: Paperback
Stanley Lippman's eloquent, small book, is a superb meditation on the design and building of object-oriented software with C#. As he maps out the different possibilities and examines different scenarios, he gives firm reasons for why you would make the different choices available to you with this C# tool. This is a lucid text. You know this guy really knows the object-oriented subject he's writing about. His words tell you that he has built these kinds of systems before, that he has thought, considered, explored and tested the implications of the various design choices that C# makes possible. This book might be late to the party, but the best parts of this book, the chapters on class design, object-oriented programming, and interface inheritance, are worth the wait. This enlightening little book takes the C# canon places it's never been before -- and quite simply are unmatched anywhere else. I would advise you to read this book slowly, you can really learn something from Stanley Lippman's C# Primer.
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Format: Paperback
This is a perfectly reasonably book however there are much better books. I found the treatment a bit eccentric and not as good for learning C# as Liberty's book. Liberty's book is not only better at teaching C#, it is significantly cheaper *and* covers far more material. There is no reason to buy Lippman over Liberty since with Liberty you get more material, a better teacher and spend less $.
Moreover, I find it impossible to imagine somebody who doesn't know C++ learning C# from this book. In sum, while this book has some useful points, I would pass on this overpriced book. I would buy Liberty's book if you wish to learn C# and you are not a super experienced C++ or Java programmer. If you are a super experienced C++ or Java, then you should just buy Troelsen's book and skip both Liberty and Lippman.
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By A Customer on Feb. 13 2002
Format: Paperback
This book is terrible. First of all it is not well written and it takes time to realize what author is talking about. Secondly author discusses advantages of certain things without describing what they are (other then mentioning their name, such as 'Hybrid classes'), so reader is left to figure out what is this supposed to mean. Examples are bad as well, skipping way too many areas. (Hey it's almost end of the book and I never seen how to get input, kind of like "cin <<") Lastly authors refers to his previous job to show some examples, yet examples are so unfitting that it makes you wonder if it is done for anything more then just bragging. There are definitely better books out there. (Actually VS help seems to be brief and to the point)
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By A Customer on April 16 2002
Format: Paperback
If you're accustomed to Lippman's previous works, this book will fall hopelessly short of expectation. I found this book to be lacking not just in content, but in direction. The "practical approach" employed by Lippman I found to be less-than-practical. The text feels hurried, does not flow well, and the sample code is replete with errors and inconsistencies. There is also alot of useless prose geared towards warming the junior programmer to object-oriented theory. This is not a good book for someone coming from a C++ or Java background hoping to come up to speed on C#. If, on the other hand, you enjoy long-winded hyperbole on "What is a constructor," with ailing code samples to match, this book is for you.
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Format: Paperback
Imagine that someone who's intellect and judgement you trust is sitting with you while you are attempting to learn a language. You both start by taking a project that you've implemented in another language and you implement it with the new language - in this case C#. The senior of the two of you shows you what the language has to offer, and some of the common pot holes in which you are likely to step.
After you've finished the project you have a much better grasp than if you just read the compiler spec and went at it. This book does just that. Stan has written and excellent book, and I thank him for the effort. He has made the learning curve flatter and saved me hundreds of times the cost of the book.
Thanks!
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