Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Cadillac Desert Paperback – Oct 5 1987


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, Oct 5 1987
CDN$ 90.83 CDN$ 0.01
Audio Cassette
"Please retry"

Join Amazon Student in Canada


--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 1 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Paperbacks (Oct. 5 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140104321
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140104325
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 13 x 3.8 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 408 g
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #390,031 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Written by a journalist, Reisner’s central argument in Desert Cadillac is that essentially the American west (past the 100th meridian) is a “semi-desert with a desert heart.” That agriculture and cities such as Los Angeles, San Diego, and Las Vegas have been able to exist solely because of a massive human effort to control and divert the water of the west.

Reisner’s focus, and almost case study type of approach, is on the state of California and the Colorado River. He points out that in the American west “water moves uphill, to money.” Quite literally, in the case of water from the Colorado River, it is pumped over the southern foothills of the Sierra Nevada, and across the Mohave Desert to Southern California. Reisner makes the point that most of the water (approximately 80%) is used for agricultural irrigation. As the soil of the American west has a high mineral and salt content, the effects of irrigation and runoff after a few years are often environmentally disastrous (e.g. Mono Lake).

Reisner’s detailed description of the damming and draining of the Colorado River is somewhat analogous to similar histories of the Columbia River Taylor), the Merrimack River (Steinberg), and the Fraser River (Evenden). While Reisner’s account is not necessarily an environmental history in the academic sense, it comes close. Reisner does a good job describing the American west’s unquenchable thirst for water. He describes in horrible detail the North American Water and Power Alliance (NAWAPA) plan hatched in the 1950s which sought to massively re-engineer rivers and waters from the Canadian Arctic Circle to Mexico. Fortunately, Canadians nationalists and Canadian and American environmentalists succeeded in blocking it.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By A Customer on June 22 1997
Format: Paperback
I read the book in the late 80s and have made it the best non-fiction book I ever read. I was drawn to it by a review in the Smithsonian magazine; an equally great resource.
The book turned me on to the subject of H20 to the extent that I soon became involved in digging up information on the water supply in Los Angeles, where I lived at the time.
Water is the lifeblood of a civilization and this book makes it both interesting and entertaining. It also led me to several other books, one of which I will recommend as well: ENCOUNTER WITH THE ARCHDRUID by McPhee.

The only negative I can come up with on CADILLAC DESERT is that it didnt have enough maps or pictures...
And that he never came up with another book as interesting as this one; Oasis book was a dissapointment
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Water crisis, a continuing story everyone should know Oct. 19 2013
By Bayard C. Hillway - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The late Marc Reisner spells it out, how various interests, public and private, fell into a pattern of getting the American taxpayer to foot the bill for decades of water development projects, many unnecessary, that justified the continuing existence and expansion of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The financial books were virtually always cooked, showing that farmers in the San Joaquin Valley, for example, received a continuous flow of water, virtually free, somehow avoiding paying the fees indicated in the original development contract. The projects were often tied to members of Congress who could point to their bringing in federal money for jobs, and water for irrigation and development. Reisner tracks the inside deals, the blatant disregard for contractual promises, and the destruction of natural treasures and prime farm land under the philosophy that no river is a good river until every possible dam has been built. Reading Cadillac Desert informs and allows the reader to be able to understand the machinations still in play that largely benefit the few, who often become incredibly wealthy, at the expense of everyone else.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Cadillac Desert Nov. 10 2011
By Randall C. Shaw - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book on the subject of water and corrupt bureaucracies (i.e. Bureau of Reclamation and Corps of Engineers). One of the most thoroughly researched books that I've read.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
BEST NON-FICTION BOOK EVER!!! June 22 1997
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
I read the book in the late 80s and have made it the best non-fiction book I ever read. I was drawn to it by a review in the Smithsonian magazine; an equally great resource.
The book turned me on to the subject of H20 to the extent that I soon became involved in digging up information on the water supply in Los Angeles, where I lived at the time.
Water is the lifeblood of a civilization and this book makes it both interesting and entertaining. It also led me to several other books, one of which I will recommend as well: ENCOUNTER WITH THE ARCHDRUID by McPhee.

The only negative I can come up with on CADILLAC DESERT is that it didnt have enough maps or pictures...
And that he never came up with another book as interesting as this one; Oasis book was a dissapointment
the Classic June 1 2014
By Ron Veelik - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
They sell this book around the South West (think Four Corners Area) in stacks at Book Stalls, News Stands, Mini-Markets, Gas Stations . It selsl well, you see folks sitting reading it, We talk about the issues in the book.
Man is living in a place that he was not meant to inhabit. The South West. that takes water, moving water costs money. Takes water away from other areas. This should be required reading for any one living in Southern California.
THE bible on water use and conservation March 29 2014
By Howard Aldrich - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you're interested in water conservation and/or what's being done to the water table in parts of this country, this book is a MUST for you to read.

Product Images from Customers

Search


Feedback