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The Carbon Diaries 2015 [Paperback]

Saci Lloyd
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
Price: CDN$ 9.77 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
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Book Description

July 1 2010
It's the year 2015, a time when global warming has begun to ravage the environment. In response, the United Kingdom becomes the first country to mandate carbon rationing--a well-intentioned plan that goes tragically awry. This story of one girl's attempt to stay grounded in a world where disaster has become the norm is told in short diary entries.
--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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'Much more than a clanging gong signalling the end of days, this is a charming tale full of laughs and angst, with a message both accessible and relevant to today's teenagers.' Bookseller's Choice, Publishing News 'It's edgy, it's appealing and it's contemporary and it makes for utterly compelling and frightening reading.' Lovereadingforkids.co.uk 'an uproarious, scathing and pathos-filled romp - Adrian Mole does the apocalypse.' Financial Times 'A daunting vision of global chaos.' Books for Keeps An absolutely brilliant read. Guardian --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

Saci Lloyd has worked as a script editor for Camouflage Films, where she was involved in several projects including a $20m Columbia Tri-Star co-production, Amy Foster. She is now head of Media at Newham Sixth Form College. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too Aug. 12 2009
Format:Hardcover
Laura Brown lives in the U.K. - and unfortunately the U.K. is the first country to establish carbon rationing. Everyone will be expected to reduce their carbon consumption by 60%. Everyone has 200 Carbon Points per month to spend on travel, heat, food, and fun. The 200 Carbon Points are loaded on a card. In order to use anything, you have to swipe your card. If you have enough points - fine. If not, your oven could shut off in the middle of cooking dinner.

People have to choose what is really important.

As tough as the carbon rationing is, the extreme weather patterns are worse. Unbearable heat, droughts, hurricanes, and floods put normal life on hold for everyone.

In addition to adapting to this new life, Laura also has to deal with typical teenage issues. Her family seems to be falling apart, her band is attempting to stay together, and she is trying to get the boy next door to notice her.

With the U.K. falling down around her, does Laura have the luxury of being a typical teenager?

Saci Lloyd has written an addicting eco-thriller. Following Laura through the toughest year of her life is fascinating. Readers will be anxious to read the follow-up, THE CARBON DIARIES, 2017.

Reviewed by: Karin Librarian
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Amazon.com: 4.1 out of 5 stars  21 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too Aug. 12 2009
By TeensReadToo - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Laura Brown lives in the U.K. - and unfortunately the U.K. is the first country to establish carbon rationing. Everyone will be expected to reduce their carbon consumption by 60%. Everyone has 200 Carbon Points per month to spend on travel, heat, food, and fun. The 200 Carbon Points are loaded on a card. In order to use anything, you have to swipe your card. If you have enough points - fine. If not, your oven could shut off in the middle of cooking dinner.

People have to choose what is really important.

As tough as the carbon rationing is, the extreme weather patterns are worse. Unbearable heat, droughts, hurricanes, and floods put normal life on hold for everyone.

In addition to adapting to this new life, Laura also has to deal with typical teenage issues. Her family seems to be falling apart, her band is attempting to stay together, and she is trying to get the boy next door to notice her.

With the U.K. falling down around her, does Laura have the luxury of being a typical teenager?

Saci Lloyd has written an addicting eco-thriller. Following Laura through the toughest year of her life is fascinating. Readers will be anxious to read the follow-up, THE CARBON DIARIES, 2017.

Reviewed by: Karin Librarian
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Terrific premise; great dystopian vision; flawed story Feb. 19 2012
By A. Steinberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Look, I'm not a teenage girl, so perhaps a teen reading this book will overlook the things that bothered me. I think every young person really ought to read this book (or see the inevitable movie -- this *was* written by a screenwriter) at some point if only to get them thinking about the possible personal and global implications of climate change. It is a well-researched and often chilling vision of what life might be like if the worst comes to pass: floods, heat and cold waves, rationing and drought and famine.

And yet...

On the other hand, the main character I found quite annoying, and while her sometime short-sightedness may be realistic for some young people faced with global crisis, her responses to truly devastating, traumatic events is sometimes shallow and unsatisfying, or at least fleeting.

More importantly, her dysfunctional parents are such caricatures (of ex-hippies, no less) that at the personal level the story never strays from broad comedy or satire. Since this family's fiddling around with pig farming (Dad) and hyper-feminism (Mom) is played out against a sort of disaster-movie background, it saps the larger topic of much of its bite. It's like a cartoon family living in a live-action apocalypse. Sounds interesting -- but it does not work here. And, frankly, a child in such a family would be much more traumatized by the way her parents treat each other, much more troubled about her truant sister's flirtations with a sort of carbon mafia, and so on.

Does this mean the book would have to be bleak and depressing from start to finish? No, but a bit more seriousness in the main character's home situation and the characters therein would allow the gravity of the environmental story to have much more impact, which it really deserves to have, as, again, the premise and style of the book are so promising.

Finally, the words "Puke!" and "Eww!" as exclamations, e.g., when parents show affection toward one another, really ought to be avoided in teen fiction (maybe especially dystopian teen fiction!). They can sound like an adult author trying to sound , well, like a teen. Puke!
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, fun, and relatable for teen readers Feb. 16 2011
By Tracy - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
The Carbon Diaries 2015 is a thought-provoking and environmentally friendly read for teens. The main character is a teenager named Laura who documents the changing world around her in her diary. She faces conflicts with friends and family, crushing on the nerdy but cute boy next door, and the United Kingdom's new and extreme policies in an effort to save the "enviro". There are extreme weather changes which keep the book exciting on the surface, and extreme changes in Laura's personal life which make the book exciting on a deeper level.
There are two forewarnings about this book, however. There is profanity littered throughout the book, but nothing overly offensive or distracting. And, teens may feel the book becomes a bit preachy about saving the environment.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rock out on the Carbon Diaries March 12 2010
By J. C. Johnson - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Finally a boook for kids to engage in the environmet with a solid story and a tremendous character.
Teachers, this is a book where with endless cross-curriculum possibilites.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Compelling, Entertaining Romp Dec 29 2009
By F. Gorrell - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Hardcover
Could not put this book down! Targeted at young adults, this diary in the voice of a 16-year old girl describes the first year of life in London - in 2015 - under strict carbon rationing that came about in response to the "Great Storm" triggered by global warming. The book is written in language that rings true to modern life (a bit raw at times), and the predicaments and conflicts are extensions from things we've already seen. The author has given her young witness to these events an authentic voice as her focus vacillates in a genuine way between the disasters besetting her world, her interest in the boy next door, her own questions about her self-image and her place in the world, and family dynamics. The book reminded me, in its comedic style, of cold war hysteria send-ups like "The Russians are Coming, the Russians are Coming."
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