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  • Carlos the Jackal (Blu-ray/DVD Collector's Combo Pack) (Bilingual)
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Carlos the Jackal (Blu-ray/DVD Collector's Combo Pack) (Bilingual)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Édgar Ramírez
  • Directors: Olivier Assayas
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: French, German
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region A/1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Studio: Mongrel Media
  • Release Date: March 15 2011
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004GB0OTQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #27,855 in DVD (See Top 100 in DVD)

Product Description

Product Description

For two decades he was the most wanted man on the planet. Now, experience the remarkable rise and fall of revolutionary terrorist-for-hire "Carlos the Jackal" in the acclaimed, action-packed epic critics are calling "one of the best pictures of the year" (David Lewis, San Francisco Chronicle). This definitive collector's edition features the full-length, three-part experience in stunning high-definition picture and earth-shattering 5.1 audio, a collection of exclusive extras, and a bonus disc containing the alternate theatrical cut from director Olivier Assayas.

Special Features (Blu-ray only) include:

- The Making of Carlos - Interview with Olivier Assayas - Interview with Édgar Ramírez - Theatrical and French trailers

Please Note: Bonus DVD contains 160 min. theatrical cut. Blu-ray contains full-length, 330 min. cut.

Review

"A hell of a ride. 4 Stars." -- Sukhdev Sandhu, THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

"Everything Che wanted to be and much, much more...astonishing!" -- Todd McCarthy, INDIE WIRE

"Excited, exciting, epic...a must-see." -- Manohla Dargis, THE NEW YORK TIMES

"Excited, exciting, epic...a must-see..." -- Manohla Dargis, The New York Times

"One of the best pictures of the year." -- David Lewis, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

"One of the best pictures of the year." -- David Lewis, San Francisco Chronicle

"Think of The Bourne Identity with more substance, or Munich with more of a pulse." -- Steven Zeitchik, THE LOS ANGELES TIMES

Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By K. Gordon TOP 50 REVIEWER on June 21 2011
Format: Audio CD
Fascinating 5 hour plus, 3 part film about Carlos the Jackal (although
he never actually called himself that) the headline grabbing terrorist
of the 70s and 80s.

With little exposition, we're dropped into a whirlwind of violence,
self-aggrandizement, sexual seduction, and power games, moving at an
almost dizzying speed. The film allows us to slowly figure out Carlos,
instead of explain him in a simple facile way.

While never sympathetic, somehow the amazing Edgar Rameriez allows us
to feel for this id and ego driven creature, powered far more by the
need for attention and adulation (whether from women or the press) than
by true belief. Indeed, one of the most interesting things about the
film is how (intentionally) shallow and hollow Carlos's political
monologues ring.

The last 1/3 is the slowest and hardest to sit through. Carlos's slow
decline into ineffectiveness and unimportance is sometimes patience
trying. But Rob Nelson, in his excellent Village Voice review makes a
strong argument that this is 1) unavoidable after the high paced rush
of the first two parts and 2) part of the point of the film; without
his fixes of women and power there wasn't much to Carlos, and without
them both he and we want it to be over.

This is a film I'd like to see again. While I don't quite agree (yet)
with the many critics who have hailed this as of the best films of last
10 years, I do think it's a challenging, brilliantly acted, wonderfully
made film, that gives context both to modern terrorism and recent world
history. Add to that, an exploration of the blurring fine line between
power and uncontrolled narcissism that seems to dog leaders (especially
male) of all political stripes from Hitler to Bill Clinton to George
Bush to Carlos.

That's a lot to successfully cover, even in 5 hours.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Eric Medina on May 17 2014
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Olivier Assayas is a great director. He directed this movie. It is about 6 hours long so I recommend watching it in 2 hour portions. Also, Edgar Ramirez plays the main character very well. He gives a great performance. I also think the soundtrack is incredible and is perfect for the different moments in the movie. This film is highly recommended by me. You will not be disappointed after having seen it! An epic film.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Format: Blu-ray
Fascinating 5 hour plus, 3 part film about Carlos the Jackal (although
he never actually called himself that) the headline grabbing terrorist
of the 70s and 80s.

With little exposition, we're dropped into a whirlwind of violence,
self-aggrandizement, sexual seduction, and power games, moving at an
almost dizzying speed. The film allows us to slowly figure out Carlos,
instead of explain him in a simple facile way.

While never sympathetic, somehow the amazing Edgar Rameriez allows us
to feel for this id and ego driven creature, powered far more by the
need for attention and adulation (whether from women or the press) than
by true belief. Indeed, one of the most interesting things about the
film is how (intentionally) shallow and hollow Carlos's political
monologues ring.

The last 1/3 is the slowest and hardest to sit through. Carlos's slow
decline into ineffectiveness and unimportance is sometimes patience
trying. But Rob Nelson, in his excellent Village Voice review makes a
strong argument that this is 1) unavoidable after the high paced rush
of the first two parts and 2) part of the point of the film; without
his fixes of women and power there wasn't much to Carlos, and without
them both he and we want it to be over.

This is a film I'd like to see again. While I don't quite agree (yet)
with the many critics who have hailed this as of the best films of last
10 years, I do think it's a challenging, brilliantly acted, wonderfully
made film, that gives context both to modern terrorism and recent world
history. Add to that, an exploration of the blurring fine line between
power and uncontrolled narcissism that seems to dog leaders (especially
male) of all political stripes from Hitler to Bill Clinton to George
Bush to Carlos.

That's a lot to successfully cover, even in 5 hours.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
1 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dia on Jan. 12 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I have been reading the Bourne series of books and wanted to know more about Carlos the Jackel. I was all set to trudge through the foreign languages and English subtitles just to get more of an idea about who this man was. Approximately 15 minutes into the movie Carlos was sitting in a bathtub got out and sat right in front of the camera absolutely stark naked and I was not prepared for the male sex organ to be the focus of attention at that moment. Shocked, I stopped the movie, destroyed the dvds and call me a prude if you wish but I am very disappointed that I could not dare to watch the rest of the movie because of this. I watch violence and barebreasted women but I do not condone it. This particular scene in the movie went too far for my eyes. Thus I am disappointed and will look for a book on the guy instead.
That being said, I as an older woman do have my boundaries for what I will watch. I am certain the movie is very informative and interesting to watch for others. Just be prepared and give it a look-see at your discretion. Packaging and format were excellent.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 4 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The most essential quality of a revolutionary is narcissism. June 11 2011
By AK - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
When Carlos, then known as Ilich Ramirez Sanchez, joined the PFLP in 1970, he was a radical and desired to be a solider in the international fight against capitalism and Zionism. It was not until 1975, in a raid on the OPEC headquarters in Vienna, that he discovered his true calling - himself. He was daring and charismatic, becoming a celebrity of a sort as his notoriety made his name a household word. Whereas such a strange life would lend itself comfortably to a biopic, in Carlos it becomes a study in vanity, and how the revolutionary is perhaps the ultimate egocentrist. The idea is not a new one, but seldom has it been rendered in such vivid tones. Clocking in at five and a half hours while maintaining a brisk pace and wasting not a moment of time, Olivier Assayas's new work further solidifies him as a master of the craft. At the helm is Edgar Ramirez with a stunning performance that captures the megalomaniac disguised as an idealist, though perhaps only disguised to himself.

Carlos sticks to the meat of the man's career, from his early days volunteering for the People's Front for the Liberation of Palestine. He staged several poorly planned jobs involving explosives and a botched assassination attempt on the Vice President of the British Zionist Federation. None of these achieved any sort of satisfaction, and it slowly becomes evident that Carlos is already an actor in his own drama. It is fun to play soldier, and he relishes the feeling of joining an international struggle to unite revolutionaries. He finally ascends the stage meant for his wily talents in the 1975 raid on OPEC headquarters, and his rhetoric is allowed to emanate from a megaphone to a global audience. Though staged as a way to call attention to the Palestinian cause, the real purpose was to kill the finance minister of Iran and the oil minister of Saudi Arabia to facilitate the crushing of a Kurdish uprising on behalf of Saddam Hussein. How this relates to power for the people, I have no idea. Neither does Carlos, but the raid reflects his ability to solidly plan for a strike, but also betrays his lack of experience and poor grasp of who he really is. The OPEC raid is the centerpiece of the film, and though it varies from the actual event, it is made clear that this terrorist is nothing of the sort. When given the chance to die for what he voiced as a higher cause, he bellows "I'm a soldier, not a martyr!" And also a coward. Rather than execute his orders by offing the targets, he takes a massive payoff from an unspecified country and reportedly pockets a good portion of the money.

Interestingly, this reveals the inherent failure destined for armed struggle. If one's philosophy is unable to compete with, say, capitalism without taking hostages and threatening violence against soft targets, then that philosophy is doomed. Such efforts would have been better spent coming up with a viable oppositional belief system that would win hearts and minds rather than providing fuel for angry, disaffected youths who only know they don't agree with what is in front of them. Still, any overt point to be made in Carlos is avoided in favor of painting in tremendous detail on a canvas that spans decades and countries, allowing the viewer to make their own conclusions. Carlos is expelled from the PFLP for his failure to follow orders. After this, he used his fame, wealth, and ability to fundraise to form his own Organization for Armed Struggle, was given assistance by the Stasi and KGB, and set up shop in Eastern Europe to attack Western targets. After seven years, pressure was applied to the nations that harbored him and his increasingly frenzied attempts to stay relevant. Finally pushed out of nearly every country left on Earth, he was isolated in Syria, and later Sudan. Surely, running guns for Sudanese butchers is for the lowest of the low.

With the end of the Cold War, he was more of a curiosity and a pathetic figure. The revolutionary can be expected to rage at the death of cherished beliefs, though Ramirez plays him as more bemused than anything. After all, Carlos was a capitalist at heart, a bourgeois twit cloaked in the proper rhetoric. This decline into obscurity is sumptuously realized by Assayas, as capitalism just outlasts such nuisances. This is not for lack of trying, but perhaps a lack of a viable philosophy to sustain any sort of movement. There is a wry sense of humor at work here; the idea that Carlos was immobilized by testicular pain when seized by French authorities because he placed a higher priority on liposuctioning his muffin top than taking proper care of his balls is hilarious.

Carlos is a wonderfully assembled work, crossing the globe with a dizzying number of characters and remaining as true as necessary to real events. The supporting work by the performers comprising the various revolutionaries who drift in and out of Sanchez's life is impeccable, and the audience is transported into a seamless recreation of a chaotic time. As entertainment, Carlos is magnificent, with a propulsive pace and an immediacy that lends an unsettling tension to any scene with Ramirez. Assayas leaves bare his subject, a supremely confident young man who grows into a fighter most capable of deluding himself into believing such conflict was in the name of freedom. One can see the seed of figures like Castro, Mugabe, or Chavez, all universally beloved soldiers for their people who became despots with a cult of personality. When the rebel - whether left or right - believes they alone hold the key to changing the world and demand that others follow, they are at the pinnacle of narcissism. The love and fealty demanded by such leaders must inevitably turn to contempt for those who give it so freely. Carlos did not even get that far. He was brought down not by enemies, but by irrelevance.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Mini-Series, A Long Form Movie, A Two Part Movie, Or An Abridged Version--Criterion Serves Up The Full 339 Minute Mini-Series Nov. 24 2014
By K. Harris - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
More than any other film in 2010, Olivier Assayas "Carlos" has made the rounds. This comprehensive biopic about renowned Venezuelan terrorist Ilich Ramírez Sánchez (also known as Carlos) has swept the globe in various editions at various lengths. Shown on the film festival circuit (Cannes, Telluride, New York) largely intact and running over 5 hours, there is also an international film version (or more than one) clocking in at about 3 hours, a U.S. film presentation in two parts, and there is the U.S. television mini-series presentation (by Sundance Channel) that came with three distinct parts and ran about 5 and a half hours. For the purposes of this discussion, I will be referencing the 5.5 hour version in this Limited Release, which is one of the more comprehensive releases (you can also get a Criterion version which is about six minutes longer). We in the U.S. still seem to be confused about whether we call this a film or a TV event with Golden Globe and Screen Actor Guild nominations in the TV categories but the Los Angeles and New York film critics distinguishing "Carlos" in the film classification. In the end, however, it's all really semantics. I just wanted to make a big deal as there are many different versions of the film floating on the international DVD market. I would recommend this or Criterion for bringing forth the full length film that Assayas envisioned.

Telling the story of Carlos, better known as "The Jackal" (even though the screenplay never acknowledges this nickname), the film has much to say about the rise of terrorism and its evolution into the modern political structure. I really do think "Carlos" is well served by the separation in the three part presentation. Part One chronicles the birth of a legend, so to speak, as Carlos works in London and Paris under the auspices of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. Having been raised by a communist father and trained in guerilla warfare tactics, Part One really covers a lot of ground as Carlos tackles many big operations and bombings to make a name for himself. But as authorities get too close, Carlos soon flees Paris after murdering several policemen. Part Two is focused on the daring 1975 OPEC raid that is perhaps the most notorious of Carlos' well-documented exploits. His mercenary life begins as a result of his new found notoriety, and he starts taking assignments on contract. Part Three focuses more on the wind-down of Carlos' career. As the world climate changes, it becomes increasingly unclear whether Carlos will be able to navigate these new challenges.

The centerpiece of "Carlos" is the charismatic Edgar Ramirez. Ramirez turns in a star making performance as the passionate, aloof, tempestuous, and charming Carlos. Through the years of his life, Ramirez expertly captures the change in tone and well as the psychological and physical shifts within Carlos' life. It's a big responsibility, but Ramirez never misses a beat. The mini-series event itself is a bit uneven, for me. Part One has so little exposition about what is happening that if you don't come into the film with some pre-existing knowledge of the world's political climate circa 1970, you may be a bit lost. You go quickly from assignment to assignment without much look at a bigger picture, and this held me at a distance from the goings-on. Part two, however, is an extremely focused look at one event and, as such, is one of the most riveting docu-dramas I've seen this year. With the Part Three wind-down, we're still emotionally connected to Carlos but the fever-pitch momentum of Part Two is missing (by necessity).

Overall, this is a serious and rewarding film especially for those with an interest in the topic. Charting the life of terrorist Ilich Ramírez Sánchez for over twenty years in such detail is an ambitious goal, and Assayas is up to the task. But almost as interesting as Carlos' life is to see the landscape of terrorism evolve through those years. In truth, I didn't love every bit of "Carlos" as an entertainment, for the above stated reasons, but Part Two and the raid of the OPEC offices is easily one of the most memorable films I've seen this year! KGHarris, 12/10.
Five Stars April 22 2015
By abraham molina - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
very good movie, fast service, thank you
2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Product defective. Will not read or play on "either of two different dvd players". Oct. 26 2013
By Discerning Consumer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Product defective as described above. Gives message on dvd player that there is NO disc in player which is absurd.Please provide return postage and insurance. This is the first and last issue of this nature, I hope if I am to continue purchasing from you. Was it inspected for other than visible scratches or just "copied" like the pirated fakes from abroad in China? From now on, I need to view each of my recent numerous purchases immediately for similar quality issues. This request is for either a full refund of my full purchase price or guaranteed inspection of replacement before mailing. It will be a good test of how you handle issues like this and determine desire for future business with you..
I do not purchase your cheapest and rely on the "validity" of your rating system. I expect high quality and pay for it commensurately.


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