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Case For Faith Paperback – Sep 21 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan Trade Books (Sept. 21 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310234697
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310234692
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 1.9 x 21.4 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 295 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (160 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #3,855 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

From Amazon

Award-winning reporter and author Lee Strobel (The Case for Christ) once again uses his investigative skills to address the primary objections to Christianity. As a former atheist, Strobel understands the rational resistance to faith. He even names the eight most convincing arguments against Christian faith:
1) If there's a loving God, why does this pain-wracked world groan under so much suffering and evil?
2) If the miracles of God contradict science, then how can any rational person believe that they're true?
3) If God is morally pure, how can he sanction the slaughter of innocent children as the Old Testament says he did?
4) If God cares about the people he created, how could he consign so many of them to an eternity of torture in hell just because they didn't believe the right things about him?
5) If Jesus is the only way to heaven, then what about the millions of people who have never heard of him?
6) If God really created the universe, why does the persuasive evidence of science compel so many to conclude that the unguided process of evolution accounts for life?
7) If God is the ultimate overseer of the church, why has it been rife with hypocrisy and brutality throughout the ages?
8) If I'm still plagued by doubts, then is it still possible to be a Christian?
These are mighty tough questions, and Strobel fields them well. Rather than write a weighty dissertation about the merits of faith, he brings us along on his quest as we meet leaders in the US Christian community such as Peter Kreeft and William Lane Craig. We also encounter his everyday friends and acquaintances that serendipitously fill in the holes in each of the eight arguments against faith. The use of dialogue from personal interviews and a scene-by-scene active narrative makes this an easy and engaging read. However, easy does not mean breezy. This is a book of substance and merit--one that will help Christians defend their faith, especially during the hardest of times, when they have to defend their faith to themselves in moments of doubt. --Gail Hudson

From Booklist

Ex-newspaperman Strobel's Christian apologetics read like feature interviews in the religion pages rather than a theological treatise. To knock down what he calls "the Big Eight" roadblocks to faith, he questions experts about them rather than logically bulldozing his way to solutions. He grills Catholic lay philosopher Peter Kreeft about the problem of evil, Indian-born evangelist Ravi Zacharias about Christian exclusivism, historian John Woodbridge about oppression in the name of Christ, and other authorities about the truth of miracles, God's callousness in the Hebrew Bible, the justice of Hell, the challenge of evolution, and the struggle with persistent doubt. Each conversation is pointed and engaging, so much so that Strobel's occasional melodramatic note (did he really speak "in a voice laden with sarcasm" to any of these, his fellow believers?) seems ridiculous. Kreeft and Woodbridge are Strobel's least doctrinaire interlocutors. The others, staunch evangelicals all, may interest fewer readers, though Zacharias on the exclusivisms of the other major religions touches on matters Americans too rarely hear discussed. Ray Olson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
A short time after the interview with Charles Templeton, my wife, Leslie, and I began driving back to Chicago, spending much of the way in an animated discussion about my enigmatic encounter with the former evangelist. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. Willson on June 8 2004
Format: Paperback
This book started me on an incredible spiritual journey. However it was not by the means that the author intended. Rather than offering good solid anwsers, "The Case for Faith" actually made me begin to doubt! Up until I read this book, I just accepted that Christianity was true because so many smart people said it was. After reading this book, I began to start thinking for myself. The 8 questions posed to refute Christianity were things that I had never given serious thought to before. As I pondered these questions, I become uneasy and began to question my faith for the first time in my life. To top it off, Stroebel and his interviewees gave weak answers that didn't hold water in my opinion. At this point I embarked on a search for Truth that has been ongoing for the last 2 years. What I came away realizing is that my faith up until that point was just a dogmatic system of belief. It wasn't real. I have since learned (and am still learning) that the Christian faith is more about experience, honesty, relationship, and following Jesus than it is about believing some rigid list of church doctrines about God and Jesus. Praise God for the work he's done (and continues to do) in my life!
The most important thing I took away from "The Case for Faith" was a quote by Madeleine L'Engle:
"Those who believe they believe in God but without passion in the heart, without anguish of mind, without uncertainty, without doubt, and even at times without despair, believe only in the idea of God, and not in God himself."
Despite the emotional and psychological trauma that it can cause, doubt is a good thing. I truely believe (looking back on my own experience) that doubt is the beginning of Faith!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stretch on March 9 2004
Format: Paperback
When I picked this book up I was extremely excited. I was having trouble refuting arguments made by friends that seemed to enjoy playing the skeptic. Reading this book as a Christian looking for "amunition" to be used against "hole-pokers" I was a little disappointed. I was hoping to find a thorough investigation of the hot buttons topics being debated in today's society. Instead Strobel seems to gloss over the surface of the these subjects, assuming that the reader is anxious to agree with his conclusion. That's the bad.
THE GOOD: He interviews a wide range of experts in their field on various topics. He cites all his and their sources in each chapter. I came away with some better basic knowledge to refute arguments, but more importantly I came away with some new sources to look into on my own. I am excited about having an expansive list of respected work to refer to when studying certain areas of contention.
BOTTOM LINE: A decent read, but not recommended for those that are looking to get their question about Faith answered in one book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rob Nowogorski on Jan. 13 2010
Format: Paperback
I gave this book five stars because it achieves what it intends to achieve with flying colours. I am wrting this review to answer several negative reviews that I've read.

The main objection that I'm seeing is that this book is a poor defense of the faith and uses bad logic. Strictly speaking, this book is a poor defense of the faith if you're looking for it to help you when speaking with your atheist friend who happens to have a Phd in philosophy. If that's the kind of thing you're looking for, try something by Richard Swinburne, William Lane Craig, Alvin Plantinga, JP Moreland, or subscribe to Philosophia Christi. This book is for the average Jane or Joe that is troubled by some of theses issues. This book will give you a solid foundation regarding these issues.

As for the claim that this book uses bad logic... every example of "bad logic" given in the negative reviews I've read are actually good logic according to the rules of logic. No logical laws are broken and no philosophical fallacies are used in the examples cited in the negative reviews. The reason people laugh at some of these answers may be because the answers are a little on the shallow side.

However if you're looking for an introductory book in apologetics this is one of the two best. The other being Unshakable Foundations by Norman Geisler and Peter Bocchino.Unshakable Foundations: Contemporary Answers to Crucial Questions about the Christian Faith

If you're new to this type of material, the answers will be very satisfying for you. If you continue to ponder these questions and start having new doubts, this book provides excellent further resources for you to explore.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kyle Butler on April 10 2003
Format: Paperback
One of my many Christian acquaintances at Tech gave me this book hoping that it might "answer" my questions. I read this book in no time, telling me that either it was dumbed down to the lowest common denominator or it made absolutely no sense. For me, I understood what he was trying to prove, yet his solution didn't close the voids. Strobel brings up some very good issues, many of which are stumbling blocks for those who doubt.
I do not recommend this book for someone seeking answers to their own doubts about religion/faith/God/etc. The evidence leaves a lot to be desired. It's well written, but poorly researched. When attempting to make a "case" for something, one hopes to read a work that is more scientific and less opinionated.
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