Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
or
Amazon Prime Free Trial required. Sign up when you check out. Learn More
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here

Catch a Fire (Bilingual) [Import]

Derek Luke , Tim Robbins , Phillip Noyce    PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)   DVD

List Price: CDN$ 16.08
Price: CDN$ 15.98 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 0.10 (1%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
Want it delivered Wednesday, August 6? Choose One-Day Shipping at checkout.
Deal of the Week: Save big on Sci-fi and Fantasy Titles
This week only: Select Sci-fi & Fantasy titles are at a one day special price. Offer valid on August 3rd, 2014, applies only to purchases of products sold by Amazon.ca, and does not apply to products sold by third-party merchants and other sellers through the Amazon.ca site. Learn more

Product Details


Product Description

A political thriller that powerfully tells the real-life story of a South African hero's journey to freedom. In the country's turbulent and divided times in the 1980s, Patrick Chamusso (Derek Luke) is an oil refinery foreman and soccer coach who is apolitical - until he and his wife Precious (Bonnie Henna) are jailed. Patrick is stunned into action against the country's oppressive reigning system, even as police Colonel Nic Vos (Tim Robbins) further insinuates himself into the Chamussos' lives. "Catch a Fire is an intelligent, fact-based apartheid thriller that tells the story of Patrick Chamusso (sympathetically played by Derek Luke), a South African wrongly accused, in 1980, of sabotaging the oil refinery where he worked. After both he and his wife are tortured by agents of the Boer government (led by a conflicted security chief played by Tim Robbins), Chamusso becomes a radicalized guerilla for the MK, or military wing, of the African National Congress. Filmed on the actual locations where its events took place, Catch a Fire bristles with urgent authenticity, its political cat-and-mouse game capably handled by director Philip Noyce, who applies the sensitivity of his acclaimed films Rabbit-Proof Fence and The Quiet American with the thriller expertise established in mainstream hits like Dead Calm and Patriot Games. The film's third-act shift toward conventional sabotage-and-manhunt plotting may seem jarring, but you can hardly blame Noyce and screenwriter Shawn Slovo (whose father led the MK when Chamusso joined) for sticking to the facts in a politically charged story handled with admirable humanity and compassion." --Jeff Shannon Special Features: Deleted scenes Commentary by director Philip Noyce, producer Robyn Slovo, screenwriter Shawn Slovo, the real-life Patrick Chamusso, and actors Tim Robbins, Derek Luke, and Bonnie Henna Deleted scenes

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.ca
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 4.0 out of 5 stars  28 reviews
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars 'Catch a Fire' fails to ignite... Dec 26 2006
By Damian Gunn - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
I had high hopes for this film; I mean I really wanted it to blow my mind. I'm a huge fan of Derek Luke and feel that he is a truly gifted actor, but despite his terrific performance this movie to me really failed to elevate past mundane popcorn fluff. I wasn't struck as I feel I could have or should have been beings the subject matter the movie embraces. I don't know if I'm alone in feeling that the movie came off a bit `made-for-TV' or `straight-to-video'. That was just my opinion I guess.

The acting was top notch, especially on the part of the two male leads. Derek Luke gives so much humanity to Patrick that you're rooting for him 100%, but to me it was Tim Robbins who stole my attention. He did such a brilliant job of making Nic Vos seem almost caring and concerned. He did so well at this that at the end, when the real Patrick Chamusso is talking about Vos being a monster I found myself thinking "was he really that bad?"...yes he was, and Tim Robbins is really that good for making me doubt it.

Another nod should go to Bonnie Mbuli for playing Derek's beautiful and distressed wife Precious. I mention beautiful because this young actress is undeniably stunning. She gave so much heart to her character that she remains the most memorable portion of the film to me.

I'm not saying that this film was a waste of time, far from it. I exposed the horrors of the apartheid in South Africa, but it just failed to deliver what it could and should have. The acting was brilliant but I guess that blame should then fall on the writers and even the director for not channeling the brilliance of the cast and developing a stronger film. It's sad because a film that could have dominated the awards season will, I fear, be soon forgotten.
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Engaging Story and Interesting Performances Nov. 3 2006
By thornhillatthemovies.com - Published on Amazon.com
South Africa, 1980.

Patrick (Derek Luke, "Antwone Fisher ", "Glory Road"), a young father with a wife and two children, lives in a small house with his mother. He is very happy and has a good job as a foreman at a local refinery. In his off hours, he coaches a ragtag group of children in football. One day, traveling back from a wedding, they are stopped and questioned regarding an explosion at some railroad tracks. Patrick wants nothing to do with politics, because he knows it will jeopardize his family and his job. Later, Patrick takes his football team to a match and they win, so he stays over with them to compete in the finals. That evening, another explosion occurs at the plant where he works. Nic Voss (Tim Robbins), the head of the anti-terrorist team, brings him in for questioning. The same evening, Patrick visits an old girlfriend and his illegitimate son, and then lies about it, making him a suspect. Unable to get anywhere, Voss and his team take Patrick's wife in and torture her as well. Then Patrick confesses, but Nick knows he isn't telling the truth and lets him go. Fed up, Patrick decides to join the ANC, the African National Congress, and travels to Mozambique to begin training. Voss is determined to squash this group and soon learns that Patrick has joined up.

"Catch a Fire", directed by Phillip Noyce ("Clear and Present Danger") is a very good film about the life of a real figure in the struggle for South Africa's independence from Apartheid.

Derek Luke is very, very good as Patrick Chamusso. Patrick is so intent on living his life with his family, trying to provide for them, make sure they are happy, that he doesn't pay attention to politics. He knows that if he is even suspected of participating in any political movement he could lose his job, his house and his family would have to struggle. He is very happy where he is in life. He has a job as a foreman at Secunda, a local refinery, which provides a house and a car for his family. He has everything he could want.

After attending a family wedding where he and his wife danced a lot, they are stopped at a roadblock and interrogated. The police throw Patrick to the ground in front of his wife, Precious, and their kids. A bomb was set off at a nearby railway station, so everyone is stopped. Naturally, because Patrick has a car and a nice camera, he is under suspicion. When they are eventually let go, Patrick doesn't think twice about it. He gets mad at his mother for listening to the political broadcasts on the radio. He wants to stay free and clear.

Then the football team he is coaching travels to a match and wins, prompting an overnight stay so they can play in the finals the next day. During that night, Patrick travels back to his home village and visits an old mistress and his illegitimate son. He speeds back in time to pick up the boys.

But during that evening, another explosion occurs and Patrick falls under suspicion because he lies about his whereabouts.

Luke brings a sense of happiness and complacency to the character. He is perfectly happy with his place in life; he doesn't want to make waves, even though the government can stop him and throw him to the ground for no reason. The fact that he has a mistress and an illegitimate child adds another level to his character. He seems so in love with Precious, yet she has a definite jealous edge to her. Then we learn Precious knows about the mistress, which explains her jealousy, but she doesn't learn of the child until much later, which colors her actions towards her husband.

Then, when Nic Vos (Robbins), the head of the Government's anti-terrorist unit takes him in for interrogation, everything changes. He doesn't know anything. Yet, they interrogate him and torture him. When he still won't make a statement, they leave him in his cell for a period of time. When they take him out, blindfolded, he is greeted by a surprise that changes his world. He is released, but he is no longer the wide eyed innocent he once was. He now realizes that nothing will get better until the people make it better.

Throughout all of this, Luke brings honesty to the role. Even when he is extolling the virtues of the current way of life, you can see a little doubt in his eyes. Then, when he changes, it is an abrupt change, but it works, because we have lived with him for a while now and feel like we know him. Bonnie Henna is also very good as Precious, Patrick's wife. From the moment we first meet them, we see how happy they are together. Then, when Patrick starts dancing with another woman, she sidles up to them and hits him on the head. Enough said. Later, after she is interrogated by Vos and his team, she has a dead look in her eyes and we know she will never be the same again.

Tim Robbins' performance is the most difficult to assimilate into our brains. At one point, Vos states "We are the minority, 3 million trying to control 25 million." The very fact the Boers thought this was an okay thing is mind boggling. They live in this country, using different bathrooms, facilities, keeping the native Blacks out of their sight. It sounds much like America during the 50s and 60s, but this story takes place in 1980. Their method of control was to create Apartheid.

Robbins' performance is very understated and initially seems a little strange. Vos is in charge, and does everything within his control to help the Boers maintain their lifestyle. Robbins is very convincing in his portrayal of this. Vos is never in doubt that the Boers should be in control and this makes him and the other members of the ruling class naturally frightening.

There are at least two scenes in which Vos and his family are enjoying a picnic among other white people. Vos pulls out a guitar and starts singing folk songs. This seems like a really overt attempt to make Vos seem sympathetic. Look at the man singing folk songs to his wife and children. How bad could he be? But I'm not sure this is the intended message. As he sings, he also reinforces how completely sure he is, and his people are, of their right to rule this country. Making him all the more menacing.

As his performance continued, I realized how menacing he is. His work brought to mind Kenneth Branagh's performance in "Rabbit Proof Fence". In each, the men are truly scary because they are so soft spoken. They are each truly convinced they are right and they should be doing what they are doing which makes them even more scary.

Robbins' performance is not as good as Branagh's; there aren't enough layers, but it is reminiscent.

"Catch A Fire" also raises a lot of questions similar to what we are currently dealing with. The actions of Vos and his men ultimately cause Patrick to turn to the path of becoming a revolutionary. Before this moment, he had no feelings for this and didn't want to jeopardize anything. But because Vos and his men treated Patrick like a piece of trash, they convinced him that his people have to do something to end the oppression. Many believe a similar situation is happening in the Middle East; the current actions of the United States are creating a new breed of terrorists.

"Catch A Fire" is an interesting, well done portrait of an instrumental figure in the fight to end Apartheid.
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Best "based on a true story" movie this year Feb. 7 2007
By Z. Freeman - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
Catch a Fire centers around the true story of Patrick Chamusso, a South African man who works as a plant foreman and quietly keeps to his family and to himself, not getting involved in the protests and demonstrations against apartheid. But when a terrorist attack effects the plant where he works and he and his wife are brought in and tortured to get information, he realizes that there is no way of simply avoiding confrontation and joins a terrorist group.

What's interesting about the film is how it presents two sides of the story, although, admittedly Chamusso is the central character. Tim Robbins plays Nic Vos, an anti-terrorist authority figure. We see Vos with his family and Robbins almost brings a sense of humanity to the character that makes you really see a man trapped in a point-of-view that he can't escape, and committing terrible acts because of this.

Derek Luke does a tremendous job as Chamusso and throughout the film his intensity is contagious, adding more and more levels to the film, while Robbins' intensity meter matches Luke scene for scene. These two actors really carry the film, although the story is moving and the supporting cast definitely keep up.

Catch a Fire is extremely relevant in a time when the United States is especially concerning itself with terrorism and trying to uncover terrorist cells. Seeing a film that presents the terrorist and the terrorist-hunter both as three-dimensional human characters really helps reminds us that this is not necessarily a black and white battle.

What is especially great about the film, is the very last scene, in which it starts out as Derek Luke as Patrick Chamusso, and finishes with the real-life Chamusso speaking. This is extremely effective in driving the point home that these events really occurred and that there are people out there who strive to make a difference in their environment.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Is there such a thing as too realistic. March 4 2007
By Dwayne Hicks - 3/22/14 till Gears 3 on Xbox One - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
After reading some of the other reviews I understand why most are saying something was missing from this film. It does does not have your typical movie characters. The people in this movie are complex and imperfect like people in real life. Derek Luke's character is beat, falsely imprisoned and has his family taken away from him. Now in your typical hollywood film he would join with a revolutionary army get trained come back and in a huge battle scene end up coming face to face with Tim Robbins character (who is the main bad guy) and kill him, credits roll and crowd cheers. This movie to its credit is much more intelligent than that. Things like that don't happen in real life. Bravo to the people who made this film. Thank You for making a different film with a powerful message.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The movie takes us to a difficult time in the history of South Africa. March 14 2007
By JP Salazar - Published on Amazon.com
Format:DVD
After watching many mediocre Oscar wannabe movies in 2006, we finally came across an excellent film that has history, drama, profound emotions, and superb acting. All these combined with an excellent award worthy cinematography. "Catch a Fire" is the drama we recommend.

Story:

The story takes place in 1980 during the Apartheid-era in South Africa. Patrick Chamusso (Derek Luke) lives with his wife and 2 daughters in a slum near an oil refinery where he works. He also coaches soccer to children in his community. Living his life away from politics seems to be going well for Patrick, but that's about to change. An explosion in the oil refinery spawns a terrorist investigation. The government is certain that it was a terrorist act by the ANC--which is an opposition political party--and they have to do whatever it takes to stop them. Government agents led by Nic Vos (Tim Robbins) wrongly accused Patrick of terrorism. He is taken into custody. He is tortured for many days, but he is not the only one. Patrick's wife is also a victim of this kind of abuse. Once released, he thinks about the injustice and the suffering of his people created by his own government. Now, there is nothing more than revenge in his heart. He leaves his family and joins the ANC to carry more terrorist acts. Will he be able to reconsider? What will he do next?

Review:

The movie takes us to a difficult time in the history of South Africa. There is a feeling of unrest and paranoia between the characters; we see who they struggle during those hard political times. "Catch a fire" creates drama because both sides fight for what they believe is right, but obviously the movie takes Patrick's side. In other words, the film tells its point of view right away by showing who are the good guys and the bad guys. Patrick is pictured here as another victim of the "white evil" government. We would have loved to see more of the "bad guys' side" to create some balance in the movie.

The acting is superb and Oscar worthy, especially by Derek Luke who did an excellent job as Patrick Chamusso. His character is very emotional and believable. We wouldn't be surprise if he gets nominated to an Oscar for that role. We would like to mention Tim Robbins for his role as supporting actor. His character shows everyone that he is cold blooded.

Director Phillip Noyce ('Clear and Present Danger', 'The Quite American') has a skillful eye for filmmaking. He is another star in the film by creating--in our opinion--the best cinematography of 2006. The film has great locations, the camera work gives you sometimes the "documentary like" look especially in the action scenes, and the night shots are beautifully crafted.

The Verdict:

1980 was not a good year for Patrick Chamusso, neither for his country. "Catch a Fire" is the film that takes us back in time. We see through the eyes of the people who suffered that tough political era. We recommend it.

Look for similar items by category


Feedback