Celeste (Gemini) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
CDN$ 9.78
  • List Price: CDN$ 11.99
  • You Save: CDN$ 2.21 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Celeste Mass Market Paperback – Mar 30 2004


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
CDN$ 9.78
CDN$ 1.69 CDN$ 0.01

Best Books of 2014
Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett’s tour of the world’s most unlikely micro-nations, moving villages, secret cities, and no man’s lands, is our #1 pick for 2014. See all

Frequently Bought Together

Celeste + Black Cat + The Unwelcomed Child
Price For All Three: CDN$ 28.76

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought



Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Star (March 30 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743428625
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743428620
  • Product Dimensions: 10.6 x 3.6 x 17.1 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 204 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #445,791 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

About the Author

V.C. Andrews® has been a bestselling phenomenon since the publication of Flowers in the Attic, which was followed by four more Dollanganger family novels: Petals on the Wind, If There Be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday, and Garden of Shadows. Since then, readers have been captivated by more than seventy novels in V.C. Andrews’s bestselling series, which have sold more than 106 million copies and have been translated into more than twenty-five foreign languages.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
First Sentence
I can't exactly remember the first time we saw our mother stop whatever she was doing, look out at the darkness, smile, nod, and softly say something like, I understand. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

Format: Mass Market Paperback
...for a "V. C. Andrews" novel of recent years to disappoint me more than the De Beers novels did. And yet "Celeste" left me both angry and sad. The legacy begun by Virginia Andrews, a truly gifted story-teller has been completely tarnished by Andrew Neiderman. I fear he has ruined her legacy beyond repair.
I honestly thought the first novel in the Gemini series would be Neiderman's redemption. I thought Virginia's ghostwriter had taken a good look at his previous three mini-series, his De Beers series, and his Broken Wings series, and had decided to try something truly different: make a real effort to produce a piece of literature, not just something to enthrall the masses of tweens that read these stories these days.
From my first glimpse of "Celeste's" cover, I was mad. The phrase "A mother's love as deady as Mommy's in FITA" caught my attention, and kept it. Andrew Neiderman has not, and will never earn the right to compare *his* V.C. A. writing to what Virginia herself wrote.
(The actual book itself was boring...an interesting concept, but horribly written.)
Virginia was a story-teller. She spun yarns. Her words...her tone...her plots...they all pulled you into the world she sought to create. By the end of one of *her* novels, you felt as though you knew each and every character personally. You rejoiced with their triumphs and ached with their sorrows. Her stories moved you...or at least, me.
No main character after Ruby Landry (aside from Rain Hudson, Brody Randolph, and Melody Logan) moved me. No series after some parts of the Hudson series, and no mini-series plot or character has ever moved me.
Neiderman's stories try to live up to V.C. Andrews and fall flat.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By j.s. on May 15 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A few years back I was a fairly dedicated V.C. Andrews fan, but then I got tired of her repetitive and familiar work. While recently browsing the bookstore I stumbled upon her latest effort, Celeste. I was quite intrigued after reading the plot's summary on the back cover. It sounded...original. Not that Andrews' work is ever bad, but lately its been a little lacking in all respects.
Celeste is about a crazed woman and her relationship with her two children, Celeste and Noble. The novel begins very slowly, attempting to give depth to the characters. It succeeds in this respect for a while, but when you hit the 100 page mark and the main conflict of the novel (Noble's death and the insane mother's attempt to turn Celeste into Noble) still hasn't begun, you start longing for more plot to chew on.
The previously mentioned plot, though, is quite riveting...as are the conflicts that arise from it. But, the novel suffers in its pacing and lack of a true climax. Andrews attempts to take the plot in two directions: one dealing with ghosts and spirituality and the other dealing with the novel's central conflict. There is almost a tug of war with the conflicts...leaving the reader wondering what is more important. And in the end, you'll feel as though the characters have not grown or changed from the moment the conflicts arose. They end back at square one and the journey you've taken with them feels pointless.
"Celeste" is more of a good idea than a good book. Yes, its premise is different and intriguing, but all of the book's filling is same old same old V.C. Andrews. Fans will probably adore it, but everyone else might get lost in Andrews' overly rich language and slow plot development. I am happy to say that, at least for now, V.C. is headed towards truly original, controversial, and memorable writing once again. This is a step in the right direction.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Why do abused people put up with the abuse? As brilliantly portrayed in the latest V.C. Andrews' first in a series "Celeste" they often believe they find the love they lack by enduring the inappropriate behaviors inflicted upon them.
Take the age old sibling rivalry for Mommy's attention together with New Age mindsets and add the isolation of homeschooling and the combination is just right for abuse and the tolerance of abuse.
V.C.Andrews'family did the right thing by continuing the legacy of works about rich people with tragic tales to tell;and certainly chose the right author to do the job. The story picture is filled in with well researched details and believable dialogue as well as enlightening the reader --without knowing it-- about great vocabulary words and interesting tidbits of trivia on a host of practical as well as engaging topics.
I could say that reading this latest offering reminded me of early VC books or was something like "Rosemary's Baby" and "Mommy Dearest" rolled into one but I think this brand of storytelling stands on its own without readers feeling the need to compare it to other works.
I look forward to the next dark soap opera installment in the Gemini series coming out in October. Can't wait!
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.
By Gerdie on April 15 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Don't be so harsh. Personally, I found Celeste to be much more of a novel than the latest books prior to this one. The GW seemed to have spent more time writing Celeste. The old "formula" was not used quite as fluent as it is in all of the family series (poor beautiful girl finds out she's really a rich beautiful girl with a dysfunctional family of greedy people; she is always tortured by the mean ones and always has a man madly in love with her). In this story there is more of a mystery. Some things surprised me here. Celeste's character was bit different. She was quite the little wimp, but it's understandable coming from her backround, though I was always hoping she'd turn around, slap her psychotic mother and run away. At least here the girl can stomach a few lies and disobey orders occasionally. The insanity of her mother was interesting at times as well, like the way she goes completely psycho when something disturbes her or "the voices" tell her something is wrong. A different range of characters appear, and I'm so glad there is not sight of one of the GW's most favorite character: the beautiful woman who is obsessed with beauty and looking young. Those women all say and act the same, making you feel like the same character is appearing in all sorts of books under a different name. Celeste's posing as her brother is creepy and strange, reminding me of My Sweet Audrina, VCA's finest work. Though this book would never add up, it too had aspects of the late-VC's masterpiece.
This book took me a while to read because I never found time to read it all at once, but once I did I was hardly satisfied.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most recent customer reviews



Feedback