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Celestis Paperback – Mar 15 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (March 15 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312862857
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312862855
  • Product Dimensions: 20.6 x 14 x 2 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 340 g
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #620,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


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3.8 out of 5 stars
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By John Wayne on May 3 2001
Format: Paperback
Paul Park definatly made an impression on me about the way our country and our life form lives our lives. We all depend on wanting to be something we are not. Here we've got Simon and Katherine,a human working for the diplomats on Celestis and the other an alien that takes drugs and has surgery so she can be more human physically and mentally. Park definately shows detail in how Katherine develops sexual tendancy, almost too much detail. When these two are kidnapped all her forms of drugs are no longer available and that is where the book becomes very exciting.
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Format: Paperback
Casual readers won't find this a fun ride at all, this is a book that makes a grab for literary status and just about succeeds. I'm not familiar with Paul Park's other works but this definitely impressed me and showed that science fiction can be more than just people shooting at each other with laser guns, it can be a frank examination of what we are and where we're going, just because the setting is another planet and the characters can't all be called "human", means nothing. Here we've got Simon and Katherine, the former a human working for the diplomats on Celestis and the other an alien that has taken drugs and had surgery so that she can be more "human" in both look and thoughts. But when they get kidnapped by rebels, Katherine is cut off from her medicine and starts to go back to what she was originally . . . her slow descent (or ascent, depending on your will) into her basic "alieness" is well handled and Park strings us along like a master? Does the book move slowly? Yeah, it does and the dream sequences at first glance appear to only be there as a literary exercise, something to fill space with. But when examined you can see that they're key pieces to the stories, like all dreams they have a bit of truth and a bit of nonsense to them but like the best dreams they reverberate. This isn't a happy book by any stretch of the imagination, the planet is shackled, the people don't want to be there, hope isn't in high quantities. But yet everyone survives and through Park's mastery of detail we get to see it all, he makes his aliens seem like aliens and his people, while they're people you might know, sometimes they don't seem too far from aliens themselves. Like I said, not an easy book but one of the more important SF works of the nineties and not one you can easily ignore.
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Format: Paperback
I was not impressed. The plot was virtually non-existant and could have been told in much less space. The dream sequences from Katharine for the most appeared to be irrelevant or, at best, unclear as to how they fit in with the story. The relationship between the humans, aboriginals, and demons was difficult to follow. And the overt sexual content was a bit much.
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