Celine Dion's Let's Talk About Love and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

Vous voulez voir cette page en français ? Cliquez ici.


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading Celine Dion's Let's Talk About Love on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

Celine Dion's Let's Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste (33 1/3) [Paperback]

Carl Wilson
5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
List Price: CDN$ 16.95
Price: CDN$ 12.24 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
You Save: CDN$ 4.71 (28%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Usually ships within 1 to 2 months.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition CDN $9.53  
Paperback CDN $12.24  
Join Amazon Student in Canada


Book Description

Dec 1 2007 33 1/3 (Book 52)
Non-fans regard Céline Dion as ersatz and plastic, yet to those who love her, no one could be more real, with her impoverished childhood, her (creepy) manager-husband's struggle with cancer, her knack for howling out raw emotion. There's nothing cool about Céline Dion, and nothing clever. That's part of her appeal as an object of love or hatred — with most critics and committed music fans taking pleasure (or at least geeky solace) in their lofty contempt. This book documents Carl Wilson's brave and unprecedented year-long quest to find his inner Céline Dion fan, and explores how we define ourselves in the light of what we call good and bad, what we love and what we hate.

Frequently Bought Together

Celine Dion's Let's Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste (33 1/3) + The Look of Architecture
Price For Both: CDN$ 23.88

One of these items ships sooner than the other.

  • The Look of Architecture CDN$ 11.64

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details


Product Description

Review


(Title mention in Sue Baker's Selection of forthcoming titles - Jan 07 Publishing News)

"Let's Talk" about one of the most interesting music books you'll read this year...The always critical and erudite Mr. Wilson actually approached Let's Talk About Love as a non-fan grappling with questions of "good" and "bad" taste... It's almost certainly the only installment in the series to discussFrench-Canadian race relations, rockism, and Milan Kundera's thoughtson kitsch."
—Idolator.com


"This could be the best book of the series...razor-sharp and unerringly intelligent." —John Wenzel, The Denver Post (John Wenzel)

"This book seriously explores the wide divide between mainstream pop that is mass-marketed and purchased, and the critics who usually sneer at it for those very reasons. It's a heady work that examines everything from 'reductive Marxist theories of culture' to why critics value restrained singing while 'American Idol' fans embrace 'show-offy' technical power." -Las Vegas Review Journal (Mike Weatherfork)

"A book pondering the aesthetics of Céline risks going wrongin about 3,000 different ways...Instead, this book goes very deeply right."
New York Magazine (Sam Anderson)

"Let's Talk About Love is a rigorous, perceptive andvery funny meditation on what happens when you realize that there's more tolife than being hip, and begin to grapple with just what that "more"might be." —MontrealGazette

"A bit of a departure for Continuum's 33 1/3 series exploringclassic records...readers of the dizzingly dweeby intellectualizing that oftenmakes Wilson's blog an exhausting pleasure to read will not be surprised that,for him, a discussion of the love theme from Titanic must encompass an examinationof Quebecois culture, the history of parlour entertainment as it relates to theimmigrant experience, the philosophies of Hume and Kant and the sociologicalexperiments of Pierre Bordieu." —Eye Weekly (Edward Keenan)


"By exploring taste, kitsch, culture, fans, the state ofcontemporary criticism, Quebec nationalism, and economics in Celine Dion's Let'sTalk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste, Carl Wilson manages to produceone of the most interesting and erudite books on why people love and hatecertain kinds of art...Readers will find themselves evaluating their views onarts with added scrutiny after reading this surprising and provocative book —HipsterBook Club


"A wide-ranging book, one predicated on the possibility that what repels us may say more about us than what attracts us...[an] insightful, engaging, and unexpectedly moving book." -Jason Anderson, The Globe and Mail (Jason Anderson)

"An important study- not just of Dion and pop music but also of the changing nature of criticism in the popular realm." —Andy Battaglia, Bookforum (Andy Battaglia)

"As refreshing a music book I have read in a long time." —Largehearted Boy, Book Notes (David Gutowski)

"An illustration of the best side of music criticism." —Erasing Clouds

"Wilsonuses Dion's record as a crowbar, and pries open the assumptions and prejudiceswhich shape our tastes in the first place. Despite our preconceptions surrounding Wilson's ostensible subject (or perhaps,because of them), the results are subtle, and startling enough to give the mostjaded of readers pause." —Flavorpill NYC
(Alex Abramovich)

"I still don't like what I know of Dion's music and probablynever will. But Wilson's efforts toexamine the rote critical assumption that Celine Dion's music blows digs up allkinds of fascinating issues about the nature of taste and the hierarchy of popculture." —Bohemian.com

"An insightful,engaging and unexpectedly moving book." -Globe and Mail (Jason Anderson)

"Brilliant." —Alex Ross, author of The Rest is Noise

"Consistently thought provoking" —Express: A Publication of The Washington Post (Matthew Siblo)

"This book is especially interesting on Dion's background... His book is intelligent and often moving."
-The Daily Telegraph


"Music criticism is often just guy-world. Wilson'sthe real thing. I can't praise thissmall book enough. Smart, but humane." —HeatherMallick, CBC News: Analysis and Viewpoint (Heather Mallick)

"It's fascinating stuff...By turns hilarious and heartwarming."—Guardian Unlimited Arts blog
(Dave Stelfox)

Mention on Offbeat.com

(Alex Rawls)

Carl Wilson was interviewed by The Onion's A.V. Club (Steven Hyden)

"Framed by an irresistableconcept...Wilsonturns the [33 1/3] series on its head by seriously considering a blockbusterhit by Celine Dion." —ChristopherGray, Portland Phoenix (Christopher Gray)

"Wilson's approach to Celine Dion...stands out. Wilson examines why he loathes it, its creator and everything about her— and what inspires devotion in her bast army of followers around the world...Clever and witty, it almost make me seek out the album. But not quite." —The Herald, Glasgow (Keith Bruce)

"Constantlyinteresting and thought-provoking...and I think he can teach us a few valuablethings about criticism, for what it's worth." —Uncut, UK (John Mulvey)

Mention in Today's Books / Bookweek
The A-List


"Wilsoncovers a lot of ground in his 161-page quest; the second half of the book readslike a Cultural Studies power ballad, invoking Roland Barthes, Theodor Adorno,Immanuel Kant, Clement Greenberg, Arthur C. Danto, and scores of othercontemporary critics in rapid succession. Perhaps most impressively, Wilson condenses Frenchsociologist Pierre Bourdieu's mammoth (and seminal) tome Distinction: A SocialCritique of the Judgment of Taste into one spry little chapter." -Rain Taxi

"It's said there's no accounting for taste, but Canadianmusic critic Carl Wilson certainly makes a Herculean effort in this latestentry in Continuum's 33 1/3 series...En route, Wilson finds plenty of fellowdetractors, generously hashes out a lengthy definition of "schmaltz," and dragsElliott Smith, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Clement Greenberg, Pierre Bourdieu,and a gaggle of shameless starry-eyed Dion fanatics into his intellectual andaesthetic morass." —Baltimore City Paper
(Raymond Cummings)

"'Morally you could fairly ask, Wilson writes, 'what is more laudable about excess in the name of rage and resentment than immoderation in thrall to love and connection?' That is, indeed, a fair and moral question, and it leads Wilson to wonder 'if anyone's tastes stand on solid ground, starting with mine.' He doesn't reach any definite conclusions, but the conversation he carries on through the centuries with everyone from philosophers David Hume and Immanuel Kant to sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, is by turns enlightening, provocative and unexpectedly moving. Wilson aptly calls Let's Talk About Love 'an experiment in taste,' and maybe as much as anything else, the book argues that such an experiment is one we'd all do well to conduct." —No Depression (David Cantwell)

"The 33 1/3 of pocket books ... are superb little volumes devoted to classic albums. What unites them is not so much their subject as the standard of the writing and imagination that the authors have brought to their task... every one I've read has been well worth the attention. Wilson's approach to Celine Dione, however, stands out ... Clever and witty."
Keith Bruce, The Herald (Glasgow), Saturday 8th March 2008.


"Let's Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste is Canadian journalist Carl Wilson's Celine Dion contribution to Continuum's inspired 33 1/3 series of short books ... Music criticism is often just guy-world. Wilson is the real thing. I can't praise this small book enough. Smart, but humane."
Heather Wilson, CBC, Monday 25th February 2008.


"[A] fascinating new book"
Dave Stelfox, Guardian Unlimited [Web], Thursday 6th March 2008.


"I teach in a university drama programme and I plan tointegrate the book into our first-year Critical Theories course as a way tointroduce students to principles of aesthetics, and to the discourse aroundpop/high culture. It's difficult to make Kantian aesthetics accessible to 18year olds. Let's Talk About Love is arare instance of the transmission of complex and sophisticated ideas inlanguage that is accessible without being dumbed-down."
-Karen Fricker, Lecturer in Contemporary Theatre, Royal Holloway, University of London

"Let's Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste offersa rare combination of compelling research and enormously entertaining writing,a real find for students of popular culture. It's a compact little volumepacked with keen insights into the ideologies that have shaped music criticismand scholarship, thought-provoking commentary on problems of aesthetics, andsensitive reflexive analysis. That reflexivity, along with a carefulbalance of critical theory and field research, makes this work particularlyappropriate for courses with an ethnomusicological angle. And asethnomusicologists continue to cultivate a growing sub-field in popular musicstudies, Let's Talk About Love is a timely and valuable resource."
-Katherine Meizel, Lecturer in Ethnomusicology,University of California, Santa Barbara

"written keenly and with great generosity"
Reviewed in Idolator, 24 December 2008


"The book [is] an engaging and intelligent study of taste and critiism framed by Celine Dion's tragic music."
EyeWeekly, 24 February 2009


"...a brilliant read and a total eye-opener. Unlike other contributors, Wilson doesn't shore up another crumbling wall of the canon but dives into a world of kitsch to ask what makes us hate music. How can we know that 'bad' music really is bad, and what is taste anyway? It'll shake all your critical certainties, which is not a very good idea when you're in my line of work."
-The Word Magazine


"Blending pop culture, cultural history, music criticism with Wilson's eclectic sensibility, the book is a fascinating look at how highbrow, middlebrow and nobrow rub meaningful observations along the way, moving on to the next without ever belabouring a point. The book is clever without the writer himself ever coming across as trying to be clever...It's like having an interesting conversation with a friend whose opinions you respect."
Toronto Star Online, November 2009


"This erudite and eye-opening book attempts to explore not only Dion's polarizing appeal but also the very concept of "taste." Along the way, Wilson traces his loathing for Dion back to her Oscars performance alongside Elliott Smith, examines the meaning of "schmaltz" and Dion's French-Canadian roots, meets her adoring fans, sees her Vegas show, reviews the album (it's the one with that Titanic song), and analyzes theories on taste from David Hume, Immanuel Kant, and Pierre Bourdieu (turns out social distinction plays a big part). By the end, Wilson has set the blueprint for a kind of music criticism that "might put less stock in defending its choices and more in depicting its enjoyment, with all its messiness and private soul tremors— to show what it is like for me to like it, and invite you to compare." In other words, let's talk about love."
-Pitchfork feature "Our 60 Favorite Music Books"


Erudite and eye-opening (Reviewed as part of Pitchfork's "Our 60 Favorite Music Books" feature)


(Sanford Lakoff Publishing News)

"This could be the best book of the series...razor-sharp and unerringly intelligent." —John Wenzel, The Denver Post (Sanford Lakoff)

"This book seriously explores the wide divide between mainstream pop that is mass-marketed and purchased, and the critics who usually sneer at it for those very reasons.  It's a heady work that examines everything from 'reductive Marxist theories of culture' to why critics value restrained singing while 'American Idol' fans embrace 'show-offy' technical power." -Las Vegas Review Journal (Sanford Lakoff)

"A book pondering the aesthetics of Céline risks going wrongin about 3,000 different ways…Instead, this book goes very deeply right.”
New York Magazine (Sanford Lakoff)

“A bit of a departure for Continuum’s 33 1/3 series exploringclassic records…readers of the dizzingly dweeby intellectualizing that oftenmakes Wilson’s blog an exhausting pleasure to read will not be surprised that,for him, a discussion of the love theme from Titanic must encompass an examinationof Quebecois culture, the history of parlour entertainment as it relates to theimmigrant experience, the philosophies of Hume and Kant and the sociologicalexperiments of Pierre Bordieu.” –Eye Weekly (Sanford Lakoff)


“By exploring taste, kitsch, culture, fans, the state ofcontemporary criticism, Quebec nationalism, and economics in Celine Dion’s Let’sTalk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste, Carl Wilson manages to produceone of the most interesting and erudite books on why people love and hatecertain kinds of art…Readers will find themselves evaluating their views onarts with added scrutiny after reading this surprising and provocative book —HipsterBook Club


"A wide-ranging book, one predicated on the possibility that what repels us may say more about us than what attracts us...[an] insightful, engaging, and unexpectedly moving book." -Jason Anderson, The Globe and Mail (Sanford Lakoff)

"An important study- not just of Dion and pop music but also of the changing nature of criticism in the popular realm." —Andy Battaglia, Bookforum (Sanford Lakoff)

"As refreshing a music book I have read in a long time." —Largehearted Boy, Book Notes (Sanford Lakoff)

Wilsonuses Dion’s record as a crowbar, and pries open the assumptions and prejudiceswhich shape our tastes in the first place. Despite our preconceptions surrounding Wilson’s ostensible subject (or perhaps,because of them), the results are subtle, and startling enough to give the mostjaded of readers pause.” –Flavorpill NYC
(Sanford Lakoff)

“I still don’t like what I know of Dion’s music and probablynever will. But Wilson’s efforts toexamine the rote critical assumption that Celine Dion’s music blows digs up allkinds of fascinating issues about the nature of taste and the hierarchy of popculture.” –Bohemian.com

“An insightful,engaging and unexpectedly moving book.” -Globe and Mail (Sanford Lakoff)

"Consistently thought provoking" —Express: A Publication of The Washington Post (Sanford Lakoff)

"Music criticism is often just guy-world. Wilson’sthe real thing. I can’t praise thissmall book enough. Smart, but humane.” –HeatherMallick, CBC News: Analysis and Viewpoint  (Sanford Lakoff)

“It’s fascinating stuff…By turns hilarious and heartwarming.”—Guardian Unlimited Arts blog 
(Sanford Lakoff)

Mention on Offbeat.com

(Sanford Lakoff)

"Framed by an irresistableconcept...Wilsonturns the [33 1/3] series on its head by seriously considering a blockbusterhit by Celine Dion." —ChristopherGray, Portland Phoenix (Sanford Lakoff)

"Wilson's approach to Celine Dion...stands out.  Wilson examines why he loathes it, its creator and everything about her— and what inspires devotion in her bast army of followers around the world...Clever and witty, it almost make me seek out the album.  But not quite."  —The Herald, Glasgow (Sanford Lakoff)

“Constantlyinteresting and thought-provoking…and I think he can teach us a few valuablethings about criticism, for what it’s worth.” –Uncut, UK (Sanford Lakoff)

Wilsoncovers a lot of ground in his 161-page quest; the second half of the book readslike a Cultural Studies power ballad, invoking Roland Barthes, Theodor Adorno,Immanuel Kant, Clement Greenberg, Arthur C. Danto, and scores of othercontemporary critics in rapid succession. Perhaps most impressively, Wilson condenses Frenchsociologist Pierre Bourdieu’s mammoth (and seminal) tome Distinction: A SocialCritique of the Judgment of Taste into one spry little chapter.” -Rain Taxi

“It’s said there’s no accounting for taste, but Canadianmusic critic Carl Wilson certainly makes a Herculean effort in this latestentry in Continuum’s 33 1/3 series…En route, Wilson finds plenty of fellowdetractors, generously hashes out a lengthy definition of “schmaltz,” and dragsElliott Smith, David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Clement Greenberg, Pierre Bourdieu,and a gaggle of shameless starry-eyed Dion fanatics into his intellectual andaesthetic morass.” –Baltimore City Paper
(Sanford Lakoff)

“’Morally you could fairly ask, Wilson writes, 'what is more laudable about excess in the name of rage and resentment than immoderation in thrall to love and connection?’ That is, indeed, a fair and moral question, and it leads Wilson to wonder 'if anyone’s tastes stand on solid ground, starting with mine.’ He doesn’t reach any definite conclusions, but the conversation he carries on through the centuries with everyone from philosophers David Hume and Immanuel Kant to sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, is by turns enlightening, provocative and unexpectedly moving. Wilson aptly calls Let’s Talk About Love 'an experiment in taste,’ and maybe as much as anything else, the book argues that such an experiment is one we’d all do well to conduct.” —No Depression (Sanford Lakoff)

“I teach in a university drama programme and I plan tointegrate the book into our first-year Critical Theories course as a way tointroduce students to principles of aesthetics, and to the discourse aroundpop/high culture. It's difficult to make Kantian aesthetics accessible to 18year olds. Let's Talk About Love is arare instance of the transmission of complex and sophisticated ideas inlanguage that is accessible without being dumbed-down.”
-Karen Fricker, Lecturer in Contemporary Theatre, Royal Holloway, University of London

Let's Talk About Love: A Journey to the End of Taste offersa rare combination of compelling research and enormously entertaining writing,a real find for students of popular culture.  It's a compact little volumepacked with keen insights into the ideologies that have shaped music criticismand scholarship, thought-provoking commentary on problems of aesthetics, andsensitive reflexive analysis.  That reflexivity, along with a carefulbalance of critical theory and field research, makes this work particularlyappropriate for courses with an ethnomusicological angle. And asethnomusicologists continue to cultivate a growing sub-field in popular musicstudies, Let's Talk About Love is a timely and valuable resource.”
-Katherine Meizel, Lecturer in Ethnomusicology,University of California, Santa Barbara

"Blending pop culture, cultural history, music criticism with Wilson’s eclectic sensibility, the book is a fascinating look at how highbrow, middlebrow and nobrow rub meaningful observations along the way, moving on to the next without ever belabouring a point. The book is clever without the writer himself ever coming across as trying to be clever...It’s like having an interesting conversation with a friend whose opinions you respect."
Toronto Star Online, November 2009

About the Author

Carl Wilson is a writer and editor at The Globe and Mail, Canada's national newspaper, and his work also has appeared in Pitchfork, Slate, The New York Times, Blender and many other publications. His pieces were selected for two of Da Capo Books' annual Best Music Writing collections, in 2002 and 2007, by guest editors Jonathan Lethem and Robert Christgau. He runs the popular music blog Zoilus.com and is part of the team behind Trampoline Hall, Toronto's acclaimed nightclub series of lectures by non-experts, which toured America in 2002.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
5.0 out of 5 stars
5.0 out of 5 stars
Most helpful customer reviews
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the end of taste is a very good place to visit Jan. 2 2008
By Evan W
Format:Paperback
This is exceptionally thoughtful criticism worked into a compelling personal narrative about how experience and judgment shape and reshape each other. It's full of easy intelligence and openness, depth of research and commitment. An inspiring and surprisingly moving work. I'd italicize the "surprisingly" if I could; who would have thought? I wish more art criticism was this good. Actually, I wish more books that I read were this good.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.8 out of 5 stars  19 reviews
38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Let's talk about a little book that packs a powerful punch... Dec 11 2007
By Cliff Milledge - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
When I took Introduction to Aesthetics in college, I wish we had a text as smart, accessible, funny, and just plain awesome as this little book on Celine Dion to introduce us to the material. What Wilson has done here with his approach to the subject of taste and tackiness is nothing less than stunning. It is a must read for people who write about music and those that love to read about it.

Nota bene: You need not be a fan of Celine Dion to love this book.
26 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best books I've ever read! Feb. 28 2009
By Phil the Hypothetical - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
It took over a year of hearing about this book before I finally caved in and bought it, and now I'm kicking myself that I didn't buy the book when it first came out! It's hard to do Carl Wilson's book justice when it has so much to say, and says it so beautifully. So let's start with the obvious: DO NOT LET THE SUBJECT MATTER TURN YOU OFF! Yes, it's a book about Celine, but it's so much more than that. It's warm, erudite, smart, funny, insightful, provocative, kind, approachable, and ultimately moving. Sure, I can see the argument that the whole concept is a bit of a stunt ("Look, everyone, I'm going to write a book about something I hate!") but when it's done this brilliantly, who cares? This is the kind of book that should be a best seller, and I really hope the author publishes another book soon.
21 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Highlight of the 33 1/3 Series! April 1 2008
By Wendy Raffel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I've read all of the 33 1/3s, and most of them are great books, each in their own way. So when I say Let's Talk About Love is my new favorite, you should trust me, b/c I know what I'm talking about. And I don't care one whit for Celine Dion... can't stand her. But Carl Wilson is an amazing writer. Maybe the best music critic we've got (visit his blog, Zolius!) and this book is truly a brilliant piece of work that waaaaay exceeds the parameters of its subject.

Check it out - you'll be glad you did, I swear.
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thoughtful discussion of taste and Céline Dion March 6 2009
By Bradley G. Bechtel - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
Why is someone like Céline Dion so popular? What does her popularity say about those who love her music, and more importantly, those who are critical of her career? Carl Wilson takes on these subjects and others in thoughtful, appreciative look at taste, criticism, and almost incidentally her 1997 best-selling release, featuring "My Heart Will Go On".

This is thoughtful, erudite reading, one of my favorite books I've read this year. I'd recommend it for anyone who is into music of whatever kind. Sure, Wilson throws big words around. If that bothers you, get a dictionary and look them up.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A thoughtful, fun book on taste Dec 27 2011
By Lee - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This is an interesting, thoughtful, and humane book with a touch of humor by a prominent music critic. Carl Wilson takes his best shot at redeeming Celine Dion from the critical consensus that she is supremely kitsch and uncool. He does this as an exercise, in order to demonstrate how that seemingly solid judgment can actually rest on snobbery, nationalism, ignorance, and class anxiety. The details are very interesting: we learn about the political history of Quebec, the turn against sentimentality in art, and how improvements in microphone technology led to the denigration of "big voice" style.

Wilson's fresh summary of Pierre Bourdieu's *Distinction* and some more recent empirical work is very good and benefits greatly from his pop-culture examples. I was surprised to learn of the survey results demonstrating that people with greater musical tolerance easily learn to appreciate the music associated with racial minorities (jazz, latin, etc.), but only extremely tolerant listeners do not shun heavy metal, gospel, and other music associated with low education. I suspect Wilson is on to something when he suggests that critics' extreme distaste for Celion Dion is partly motivated by a desire to distance themselves from low education / "white trash" culture.

The author also name-checks Hume, Kant, and other deep thinkers on the nature of taste, but these philosophical parts of the book are the shortest and least enlightening.

Later in the book Wilson meets with some fans of Dion to discuss why they like her music and what she means to them. This section cashes out the more speculative, sociological/philosophical passages. Wilson displays a deep humanity in these chapters. The fans have their own complicated backgrounds, as everyone does, and their admiration for Dion rings true in the context of their convictions, affiliations, bonds, heritage, and ways of living. These portraits make apparent how easily a critic could denigrate their musical tastes in the course of thoughtless social jockeying.

The book ends with a review of the album *Let's Talk About Love*, informed by what Wilson has learned in the course of his research. It's very charitable, but it wouldn't convince me to buy the album. Almost, though.
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews

Look for similar items by category


Feedback