Quantity:1

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
      

Cello Son/Str Qrt Import


Price: CDN$ 19.12 & FREE Shipping on orders over CDN$ 25. Details
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.ca. Gift-wrap available.
11 new from CDN$ 13.20 2 used from CDN$ 14.24

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product Details

  • Audio CD (June 1 2010)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: Erato
  • ASIN: B00005RFSM
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)

1. Cello Sonata in A minor Op. 36: Allegro agitato
2. Cello Sonata in A minor Op. 36: Andante molto tranquillo
3. Cello Sonata in A minor Op. 36: Allegro-Allegro molto e marcato
4. String Quartet in G minor Op. 27: Un poco Andante-Allegro molto ed agitato
5. String Quartet in G minor Op. 27: Romanze: Andantino
6. String Quartet in G minor Op. 27: Intermezzo: Allegro molto marcato
7. String Quartet in G minor Op. 27: Finale: Lento-Presto al Saltarello

Product Description

Product Description

Amazon.ca

If you're familiar with Grieg's piano concerto, you'll hear its melodic fingerprints (influenced by Norwegian folk dance tunes) throughout the present chamber works, notably in the Cello Sonata's first movement and the G Minor String Quartet's Intermezzo. The Sonata stands out for Truls Mørk's seamless bow arm, cutting edge fortes that never take a vulgar leap, and soft playing that whispers with fullness of body. His pianist, Håvard Gimse, proves an incisive equal partner, rather than deferential accompanist. For all its fullness of texture and quasi-orchestral scope, the quartet's abundant lyrical ideas linger longest in your inner ear. Mørk and colleagues offer a hard-nosed, terse performance characterized by gaunt, slashing double-stops and a less genial mindset than the Auryn Quartet's wistful slides and looser-limbed phrasing (on the CPO label). The quartet is well engineered in a resonant space, but the Sonata's drier sonics, by contrast, sound comparatively constricted. --Jed Distler

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See the customer review
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 26 2004
Format: Audio CD
It's not hard to see why this recording has garnered so much critical attention. Besides the ardent and highly disciplined playing of Truls Mork and his accomplices--notably the excellent pianist Havard Gimse, a Grieg specialist--there is the music: Grieg's chamber works are rarely given their due, but here are two of his finest in performances that are bound to make believers out of all but the most skeptical listeners. Perhaps the cello sonata is the better piece (the notes to this CD seem to indicate such), but I'm more impressed with Grieg's lone string quartet, whose quasi-symphonic sound and slightly off-kilter saltarello last movement (Bergamo by way of Bergen!) make for memorable listening. Add to this a scherzo as finely wrought as just about any by Dvorak and an overheated first movement that gives the lie to those who feel Grieg's emotional range is limited, and you have a work that demands to be heard again. And again, if only to see whether or not the very interesting parts add up to a credible whole. I'm still trying to figure this out myself, but the String Quartet is nonetheless a fascinating composition.
Even if I feel the Cello Sonata is less adventurous, more typical of Grieg in his folky vein--especially the bounding last movement--clearly it is a work of stature as well. And it probably hangs together better. The first movement has much of the grand drama of the comparable movement of the string quartet, while the slow movement, based on Grieg's own march from Sigurd Josalfar, is Grieg at his most introspective, rising to a fever pitch in the minor-key central episode.
Besides the fervent playing of Mork and the other young musicians involved, there are additional attractions, including a powerful, you-are-there recording of the sonata made at the Grieg House in Bergen and an even more atmospheric one of the quartet made at a church in Oslo, plus fine liner notes and lovely color photos of the Grieg House and grounds. Highly recommended.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 2 reviews
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Grieg as We All too Rarely Hear Him April 26 2004
By A Customer - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It's not hard to see why this recording has garnered so much critical attention. Besides the ardent and highly disciplined playing of Truls Mork and his accomplices--notably the excellent pianist Havard Gimse, a Grieg specialist--there is the music: Grieg's chamber works are rarely given their due, but here are two of his finest in performances that are bound to make believers out of all but the most skeptical listeners. Perhaps the cello sonata is the better piece (the notes to this CD seem to indicate such), but I'm more impressed with Grieg's lone string quartet, whose quasi-symphonic sound and slightly off-kilter saltarello last movement (Bergamo by way of Bergen!) make for memorable listening. Add to this a scherzo as finely wrought as just about any by Dvorak and an overheated first movement that gives the lie to those who feel Grieg's emotional range is limited, and you have a work that demands to be heard again. And again, if only to see whether or not the very interesting parts add up to a credible whole. I'm still trying to figure this out myself, but the String Quartet is nonetheless a fascinating composition.
Even if I feel the Cello Sonata is less adventurous, more typical of Grieg in his folky vein--especially the bounding last movement--clearly it is a work of stature as well. And it probably hangs together better. The first movement has much of the grand drama of the comparable movement of the string quartet, while the slow movement, based on Grieg's own march from Sigurd Josalfar, is Grieg at his most introspective, rising to a fever pitch in the minor-key central episode.
Besides the fervent playing of Mork and the other young musicians involved, there are additional attractions, including a powerful, you-are-there recording of the sonata made at the Grieg House in Bergen and an even more atmospheric one of the quartet made at a church in Oslo, plus fine liner notes and lovely color photos of the Grieg House and grounds. Highly recommended.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
wonderful stuff May 15 2008
By jsa - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
What a great find - two eminently listenable chamber music masterpieces from Grieg, passionately played and beautifully recorded. I was very familiar with the quartet from a recording by the Oslo Quartet (Naxos) in my collection, but I had never heard the cello sonata. I was immediately won over by it, a really great piece of music. And the quartet performance is truly distinguished, full of passion but never frenetic. Just wonderful.

Both works contain Norwegian folk material and are recognizable as Grieg compositions, but in no way do they contain "too much folksiness," a concern Grieg expressed prior to embarking on the quartet. On the other hand, the composer wrote music that people could identify with and would listen to, therefore the distinctive national flavor is very much embedded in both works.

This is an essential acquisition for Grieg lovers; and who doesn't love Grieg?

Very highly recommended!


Feedback