Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage giftguide Cyber Monday Deals Week in Home & Kitchen Kindle Music Deals Store SGG Tools
Cello Sonatas Vol. 2 has been added to your Cart

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Cello Sonatas Vol. 2 Import

Price: CDN$ 26.84 & FREE Shipping. Details
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Ships from and sold by Gift-wrap available.
10 new from CDN$ 22.12 1 used from CDN$ 205.00

Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 20 2003)
  • SPARS Code: DDD
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Import
  • Label: MD&G Records
  • ASIN: B00008MLVE
  •  Would you like to update product info, give feedback on images, or tell us about a lower price?

1. Allegro
2. Allegrettto Siciliano
3. Allegro
4. Praeludium. Andante
5. Allegretto Quasi Andante
6. Andantino
7. Poco Allegro E Scherzando
8. Allegro
9. Scherzo. Vivo
10. Andante Con Moto
11. Allegro Molto

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on (beta) 1 review
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Brahmsian Cello Music by an Otherwise Unknown Composer Jan. 15 2005
By J Scott Morrison - Published on
Who is Friedrich Kiel, you ask? He was a German composer and teacher, based in Berlin, who in his day was a good deal better known than today. Among his students were Charles Villiers Stanford and Ignaz Paderewski. He has the odd distinction that in the days before the automobile he nonetheless died in Berlin as the result of a traffic accident. His works are perhaps the best compared to those of Brahms. I discovered him quite by accident a few years ago and have since obtained most of what I could find of his music, including this second volume of his cello and piano music recorded by Hans Zentgraf, cello, and Christoph Ulrich, piano. The CD contains his 'Little Suite,' (the cello version of a piece originally for violin and piano) and the Opus 67 Sonata that was originally for viola and piano. The other cello sonata here (and without opus number) was indeed written originally for cello/piano duo. All three pieces are infused with Brahmsian warmth and although they may not be quite as inspired as similar pieces by Brahms they could easily be mistaken for his music. That is high praise indeed.

The performers, known to me only from their earlier first volume of his cello/piano music, are really quite good, and they are given warm, lifelike sound. I would strongly suggest that if you like cello/piano music and you love Brahms you'll thank me if you buy this one.


Scott Morrison