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Charleston, SC 1966


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Charleston, SC 1966 + True Believers + Learn To Live
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (Oct. 12 2010)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Universal Music Canada
  • ASIN: B003PON2GM
  • In-Print Editions: Audio CD
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #17,661 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Come Back Song
2. The Craziest Thing
3. Things I'd Never Do
4. I Don't Care
5. I Got Nothin'
6. In A Big Way
7. Love Will Do That
8. Might Get Lucky
9. Beautiful Like That
10. Southern State Of Mind
11. This
12. We All Fall Down
13. Whiskey And You

Product Description

2010 sophomore solo album from the former Hootie & The Blowfish vocalist and Country superstar. Darius Rucker signed with Capitol Records Nashville in 2007 and has since been embraced by the country music community with his chart-topping 2008 debut, Learn to Live. His second album, Charleston, SC 1966, features the single 'Come Back Song'.


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Customer Reviews

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Most helpful customer reviews

By Saltwater J on Jan. 13 2011
Format: Audio CD
This CD is truly a joy to listen to. The lyrics are clever (when they need to be), thoughtful, and honest. His melodies are authentically Rucker, catchy and memorable. The strength of this album, though, is the voice - a unique expression of the essence of all the music on the album. Definitely worth listening to - over and over...
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By BrookyGirl on Dec 31 2010
Format: Audio CD
This CD doesn't disappoint the people who loved his first CD, He is growing and becoming even more awesome as a singer, i can't wait for what he has coming in the future!
This CD appeals to everyone, there is fast, slow, sad, happy, absolutely amazing songs on this CD!
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By Natasha Reichlin on Dec 20 2013
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Great cd, one great song after another! His voice is incredible and the songwriting is great, too. Good buy and fast shipping!
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By Leigh A. St Louis on Jan. 1 2015
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
great delivery and product is excellent
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 154 reviews
31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
Darius' Radio Friendly Tour Across "Charleston, SC 1966" Oct. 12 2010
By Timothy Yap - Published on Amazon.com
Prime Cuts: We All Fall Down, Come Back Song, She's Beautiful

Hootie who? Despite being the front man of Hootie and the Blowfish, Darius Rucker has made himself such a name in country music that has made his days with the Hootie a distant memory. Not since Charley Pride has another African American country artist made such a squall on the country music front. Three consecutive number ones from his debut disc "Learn to Live" and garnering the New Artist Award at CMA have certainly firmly established Rucker as one of the mainstays of the genre. Sophomore follow -up "Charleston, SC 1966" ought to continue to give Rucker the same red carpet treatment of more awards and number one hits. Like his solo debut, "Charleston, SC 1966" continues on the same radio ready path of pop country with that occasional touch of southern charm. And just like his predecessor, Rucker has a hand in co-penning all these cuts with some of Nashville finest scribes including Brad Paisley, Ashley Gorley, Frank Rogers, Kara DioGuardi among many others.

Inspired by Radney Foster's 1992 landmark "Del Rio, TX 1959" where Foster names his Arista debut under the name of his hometown and date of birth, "Charleston, SC 1966" follows suit for Rucker. While Foster's release was a masterpiece of creative ingenuity, Rucker's counterpart is less adventurous. Not that it's a ropey effort. Rather, the songs are mostly safe and radio-targeted. Best tailored towards radio is lead single "Come Back Song" a sensitive mid-tempo acoustically driven ditty telling the story of a mildly depressed man trying to win back his paramour after committing some foolish mishaps. While the age-appropriate "Might Get Lucky" tells of a frustrated middle-aged husband trying to juggle between the kids and some fun time with the Mrs.. Brad Paisley joins Rucker in penning the randy "I Don't Care" that bares all the marks of Paisley's patented humor over a light-hearted but catchy tune.

There are a couple of soul-searching numbers including the hymn-like ballad "We All Fall Down." "We All Fall Down" truly showcases what a fine singer Rucker is especially in his impeccable delivery and his ability to emote the feelings of the song. "She's Beautiful" is another gorgeous ballad that testifies to man's contentment with his life and wife. Harkening back to his roots, "Southern State of Mind" is a ode to southern living (such as sweet tea and opening the door for the ladies) that ought to put a smile on anyone who has ever graced the south before. Nevertheless, the breakup song "I Got Nothing" and the dark bluesy "Whiskey and You" border on acceptable without being memorable. Although the Alan Jackson-influenced "The Craziest Thing" has a tad of added Cajun spice to it that ought to get our feet grooving to its infectious melody.

At the end of the day "Charleston, SC 1966" is a smooth, polished and enjoyable endeavor. And the songs all have a distinct southern feel to it that truly makes this as country as radio allows it. Nevertheless, the tracks are far too safe. It would have worked even better if Rucker loosen his grip on his pen a little--a few songs from other Nashville writers may elevate this from being relegated as a kiss radio effort.
17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
Darius makes me like country music again. Oct. 12 2010
By Robert G Yokoyama - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
I love this new music from Darius Rucker. "Charleston SC, 1966" is a reference to Darius Rucker's birth place and birth year.

My favorite track is the duet with Brad Paisley. "I Don't Care". This is a fun song is about living a carefree life drinking beer and looking at pretty women.

My other track is "Come Back Song". This song is about trying to get back together with someone. I love his vocals on this song. The mandolin playing by Sam Bush is excellent on this song.

"Might Get Lucky" is a song about trying to rekindle the romance in a relationship while hoping to get lucky. A lot of married people will relate to the lyrics of this song.

"Southern State of Mind" and "In A Big Way" are two songs about what a huge influence growing up in the South has on his personality. I love these two tunes. "Whiskey And You" is the prettiest song about alcohol I have ever heard. I love the musical arrangements on the song "The Craziest Thing". All the instruments on this song are excellent. I love the piano playing by Gordon Mote and banjo playing by Bela Fleck.

"We All Fall Down" is a reminder that people make mistakes and fall short sometimes. The mandolin playing is played beautifully on this song. "I Got Nothin" is another song about trying to prevent a loved one from leaving. The lyrics of this song sound very honest. I like it a lot. This is a song about learning lessons throughout life. This is a very upbeat and fun song.

"She's Beautiful" is a song learning to love the inner beauty of a woman. I like this song very much. Darius makes me like country music again. The music on this disc is so much fun.
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
Still a Southern boy Oct. 12 2010
By Nse Ette - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Former Hootie & The Blowfish frontman Darius Rucker reinvented himself as a Country singer, after the dismal showing of his brilliant but overlooked Neo-Soul debut "Back To Then". It paid off as his sophomore CD "Learn To Love" went on to sell over a million in the US.

His new CD "Charleston, SC 1966" pays homage to his hometown and year of birth, as well as his friend and biggest influence Radney Foster. It is, he says, a continuation of its predecessor but I think the songs are even catchier this time around. Opening is the upbeat Rock-tinged "This" with a chorus reminiscent of Hootie & The Blowfish's "Only Wanna Be With You". Other catchy upbeat songs are "Might Get Lucky", the jangly banjo/fiddle-driven "Love Will Do That", and the traditional sounding "I Don't Care" (featuring Brad Paisley).

However, it's the albums ballads that are a revelation; "Come Back Song", "Whiskey & You" (with quivering guitars and a nice pedal steel guitar solo), "Southern State Of Mind" (in which he tells us he's a well-mannered southern gentleman who holds the door open for ladies), "Things "I'd Never Do", "She's Beautiful", "I Got Nothing" and the retro "In A Big Way". My favourite is "We All Fall Down", a truly spectacular ballad with powerful lyrics offering hope and redemption.

When Rucker veered into Country, I didn't expect to like it but surprisingly I do, and his latest should see his star continue to ascend.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
A Bit Stronger Than His Debut Oct. 15 2010
By Emgee - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Darius Rucker's debut album Learn To Live was very strong, and even the couple of filler tracks were easy to listen to and enjoy. Filler material is virtually absent on his new album.

Each track is unique, again exploring a variety of themes. Rucker finds himself acting the way he's always acted, despite locational displacement ("Southern State of Mind"), doing what he promised he wouldn't ("Things I'd Never Do") and kicking back and drinking with Brad Paisley ("I Don't Care").

A great sophomore album.

Standout tracks:
"The Craziest Thing"
"Whiskey and You"
"Southern State of Mind"
"Things I'd Never Do"
"I Don't Care"
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Another Great Album Oct. 13 2010
By Eric Stevens - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
First of all, I have been a loyal Darius follower since the beginning of the Hootie days through the good and the bad. I have every album he has created, including the R&B solo album. His success in country music is amazing to watch as a true fan. I think Darius has proven over the years that he can sing anything.

When I think of a really good album, it is one of those albums that you can listen to all the way through, not want to skip songs, and can listen to for weeks at a time in your car. Charleston, SC 1966 is like that for me. Some critics do not like this album because it is "radio-ready" or "country pop" or "familiar" but these are the songs that people want to hear and request. Any given song on Charleston SC, 1966 can be a hit on country radio, and to me that makes it a solid album. I thought the same thing about Learn to Live when I first heard it, every song on the album would have been a hit if it were released. He will ALWAYS be criticized for being Hootie but he has made two great country albums, and I am very excited to see Charleston, SC 1966 performed live.

My struggle now is trying to determine if Charleston, SC 1966 is a better album than Learn to Live. It is a very tough call since there are so many good tracks collected on one album. My favorite tracks on this album are "In A Big Way," "This," "Might Get Lucky," "Whiskey and You," "Southern State of Mind," "The Craziest Thing," "Things I'd Never Do," and "Love Will Do That." Many of the songs I listed are upbeat and fun which is the kind of music that Darius likes to make. The slower songs are powerful and convincing especially "Whiskey and You" and "Things I'd Never Do." "Come Back Song" isn't the strongest song on the album for those hesitant to purchase. If you purchased Learn to Live based on "Don't Think I Don't Think About It" you will be blown away by the rest of the album once again. "I Don't Care" is a typical Brad Paisley style song which is a sure fire number one summer song. For me, the weakest track on the album is "We All Fall Down" it reminds me of "If I Had Wings" on Learn to Live which was the only song I skipped regularly. If you liked Learn to Live, you will love this album just the same, it is hard to pick between the two. The new RollingStone review made a great point that I will close with. "Say what you will about Hootie and the Blowfish's profound mediocrity -- their massive success was merely the launching pad for Darius Rucker's true calling: country." - Mark Kemp, RollingStone.

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