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Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Unknown Binding – 1973


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Puffin 1973 (1973)
  • ASIN: B003AKG50G
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (276 customer reviews)

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most helpful customer reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 26 2005
Format: Hardcover
I have seen a lot of people talk of this book since the movie came out... I love this book an I have read this book many times still I was 12 years old and it teaches a lot of things including tips on parenting... This is one of those books that children should read often because it is not only a fun book but it does make you think... Event though children don't see this they will learn from this book after a while... Its like the litle prince... children see the magic first then as they read again later in their lives they see that this book has many layers!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on Nov. 6 2001
Format: Paperback
What is the probability of you getting one of five golden tickets in the world? Not very big. That is exactly what Charlie thought. But, every time he bought the one and only 'Wonka Bar' he felt a feeling that he was going to win. He never gave up, that is what made him a winner.
I am a lot like Charlie in some ways. Charlie never gave up until he knew that there was no possible chance of him wining, just like me. I liked this book, because I can relate to most characters, and recommended it to people of all ages.
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Format: Paperback
Instant classic this Roald Dahl story is. Indeed, this novel details how the little pauper Charlie Bucket wins a contest to visit the chocolate factory of the reclusive Mr.Willy Wonka. Alongside four other children and their parent, Charlie, with his grandfather, uncovers a world of sweets and danger that will test each of the boys and girls in their group. A story that also continues in the sequel, Charlie and the Glass Elevator, in which Charlie's family has a more serious involvement in.

Through this story, Roald Dahl displays to us different rotten behaviors children can exhibit. Gluttony, insolence, greed, and a craving for violence. Attitudes that parents are in general responsible for various reasons, either out of irresponsible parenting or by displaying such actions to their children. Which the author condemns through the Oompa-Loompas excellent songs as the factory's inventive machines and candies reveal the true nature of those who succumb to their temptations which I think even adults would want to eat for themselves if they were in that company.

Alongside Quentin Blake's awesome illustrations, the fantastical imagination of Roald Dahl becomes complete and turns into a world that is unlike what most children literature promotes. A story where the bad guys are not adults, but children. A moralistic classic that gave the author hostile reactions, including one vicious criticism from Ursula K LeGuin who accused him of making her daughter mean through this book she adored to reread. Fortunately, praises have overturned the majority of negative criticisms; geniuses like J K Rowling herself have promoted it as an important read for all children while the magnificent Tim Burton did a wonderful adaptation.
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Format: Paperback
There's plenty that adults can learn from children's books. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is such a book. Not only is it a great read, it says something about greed, gluttony, and the dangers of the fantastic.
The story is probably familiar to many (thanks to the 1971 film adaptation), but the basic plot is this: Willy Wonka, a reclusive, famous (almost Howard Huges-like) owner of the largest candy factory in the world wraps five golden tickets in candy bars and distributes them to the world. No one has been in or out of Wonka's factory in years, but these tickets allow the ticket finders access to it for one day, as well as a lifetime supply of world-famous Wonka candy. Four tickets are quickly found by families who have the money and the means to do so (one of the finder's father even stops production in his factory so that his voluminous workers can unwrap the thousands of candy bars he's purchased in hope of finding one of the tickets). This is discouraging to Charlie Bucket, who comes from a destitute family who eat mostly watery cabbage and boiled potatoes. Charlie only gets one chocolate bar a year for his birthday - his father's job screwing on the tops of toothpaste tubes doesn't bring much income. Charlie's luck changes when he finds a dollar bill in the snow (after his father loses his job in the toothpaste factory the family begins to starve, and Charlie conserves energy by walking slowly, which helps him find the dollar). Luck leads to luck, as Charlie buys two candy bars and the second one contains a golden ticket. Charlie's 95 year-old (wow!) grandfather agrees to accompany Charlie. So, Along with four other spoiled brats and their families, Charlie and Grandpa Joe tour the Wonka factory.
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Format: Hardcover
I actually picked this book up to read for myself, but after reading the first chapter I thought it might be something my two girls who are 5 and 7 might be interested in as well. "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory" is one of the movies we own and love, and they were already familiar with all of the characters. We sat down on the couch late this past Saturday afternoon and I began to read it to them. After the first chapter I asked them if they wanted me to stop, and instead they begged for more. I read another, and another, and another, and finally after the eighth chapter in a row I told them I had stop since it was time for them to go to bed. They were very disappointed, and they made me promise I would read more of it for them the next day. Believing it was just a ploy so that they could stay up later I didn't take it very seriously, but sure enough right the next morning they were up and had me start reading it to them right away. They didn't even want to watch any early morning cartoons, or play on their Playstation II. Before you knew it we had gotten through the first hundred pages in no time at all. I've never seen them love a book so much. The illustrations by Quentin Blake throughout the book, and especially right at the beginning, were wonderful. They grabbed my kids imaginations and kept them long enough to get into the words. Then once the story line kicked in they were hooked.
We loved all of the characters. There's the eccentric candy making genius Willy Wonka who has locked himself away in his chocolate factory so that the other candy makers can no longer steal his inventions. The gates are always locked, and nobody goes in and nobody comes out. Mr. Wonka holds a contest, which seems to just be a promotion to generate sales, but Mr.
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