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Chasing Darkness: An Elvis Cole Novel Hardcover – Jul 1 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1 edition (July 1 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0743281640
  • ISBN-13: 978-0743281645
  • Product Dimensions: 24.3 x 16.2 x 2.6 cm
  • Shipping Weight: 476 g
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #626,448 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

Crais is on cracking form, with a fast moving plot with enough twists and turns to keep readers guessing GOOD BOOK GUIDE A fast-paced satisfying thriller HUDDERSFIELD DAILY EXAMINER --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Robert Crais is the author of many novels, including the New York Times bestsellers The Last Detective, Hostage, and L.A. Requiem. Learn more about his work at www.robertcrais.com.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jenifer Mohammed, Author of Resurrecting Cybele TOP 500 REVIEWER on Aug. 6 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another exciting story with lots of twists and turns that will keep you guessing to the very end. Cole must investigate a suicide to see if a man he helped clear of murder was actually a serial killer. Great mystery!
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By DGC on Sept. 6 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Good book.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Aug. 14 2008
Format: Paperback
Stephen King teaches novelists to think of an unusual situation to start the book and then let the book write itself from there. Chasing Darkness proves that formula isn't surefire advice. Despite a very interesting and unusual beginning, Chasing Darkness manages to end up feeling all too pedestrian at the end.

Elvis Cole and Joe Pike are inspired characters who have provided their fans hours of amusement, entertainment, and dark humor. When those two are at it, the rest of the story doesn't matter so much.

What do we make of this book which crowds out Joe almost entirely and gives us relatively little amusement, entertainment, and dark humor from Elvis? The plot had better be pretty good. And it starts off like that, until it twists into dry gulch you've been down far too many times before. As a result, the book ends with a whimper rather than a bang. It's definitely deflating for the reader.

But if you are a dyed-in-the-wool fan of this series, you'll want to read the book. It's good enough not to skip. Keep your expectations low and you'll enjoy the book more than I did.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on Aug. 14 2008
Format: Hardcover
Stephen King teaches novelists to think of an unusual situation to start the book and then let the book write itself from there. Chasing Darkness proves that formula isn't surefire advice. Despite a very interesting and unusual beginning, Chasing Darkness manages to end up feeling all too pedestrian at the end.

Elvis Cole and Joe Pike are inspired characters who have provided their fans hours of amusement, entertainment, and dark humor. When those two are at it, the rest of the story doesn't matter so much.

What do we make of this book which crowds out Joe almost entirely and gives us relatively little amusement, entertainment, and dark humor from Elvis? The plot had better be pretty good. And it starts off like that, until it twists into dry gulch you've been down far too many times before. As a result, the book ends with a whimper rather than a bang. It's definitely deflating for the reader.

But if you are a dyed-in-the-wool fan of this series, you'll want to read the book. It's good enough not to skip. Keep your expectations low and you'll enjoy the book more than I did.
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 384 reviews
184 of 196 people found the following review helpful
Next Title: Elvis Cole and Sunset Living? July 9 2008
By Gary Griffiths - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
So I'm beginning to feel like all of the big names in pop thriller/crime fiction - Lee Childs, James Lee Burke, James Patterson, and now Robert Crais, are getting either bored or lazy, or have somehow managed to misplace the passion and fiery writing that placed them in their well deserved positions (well, except perhaps Patterson) on the big best seller lists. Yes, I'm a Robert Crais fan. The early Elvis Cole was smart, funny, and in your face - definitely an updated, more hip, and slightly more irreverent version of the venerable Raymond Chandler's Phillip Marlowe and today's answer to the hard boiled LA that Chandler invented. And Joe Pike? In Crais' prime, can you think of a supporting cast member more menacing - a more cleverly and intelligently rendered butt-kicker - the hands down candidate for the guy you'd least want to have on the other side of a street fight - or any kind of fight? Leaves me yearning for "LA Requiem", "The Monkey's Raincoat", or Crais' outstanding stand alone effort, "The Hostage".

To be fair, "Chasing Darkness" is by no means a bad read. In fact, it starts out with an intriguing "murder in a locked room-like" premise that is genuinely gripping, and definitely held my attention. And without the distraction and baggage of Cole's annoying girlfriend Lucy hanging around to mush up the action, I was getting ready to declare that "Crais is back" after what a thought were a couple of sub-par installments. But before long it starts feeling a bit tired with crooked cop conspiracy theories and all too familiar themes. And the intimidating Pike is relegated to a near cameo role, emerging with only enough adrenaline to help Elvis beat up some kids. At the end of the day, the enigma unravels too easily, and if you devote more than a few seconds to dissecting the mystery, you'll find a hole big enough for Cole's 'vette and Pike's Jeep to drive through - side-by-side.

When all is said and done, "Chasing Darkness" is mostly an entertaining ride, but essentially flat - a journeyman's effort that had that "got-to-do-this-to-meet-my contract" feel to it. The Crais aficionado - like me - will want to read it, but it is far from his best effort, and a sure sign that the talented Mr. Crais should take the hint from Dennis Lehane and William Lashner, and take some well deserved time off to recharge his classic crime-busting mojo. And should he take this hiatus, Crais fans take heart - their are plenty of great new writers - Huston, Swierczynski, Gischler, McKinty, Doolittle and more - to fill the gaps while the old guys like Crais and Child take a vacation to remember the kind of writing that got them to the top.
90 of 99 people found the following review helpful
Elvis' Story July 4 2008
By Richard B. Schwartz - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Joe PIke is along as well and so is Carol Starkey, but this is Elvis' story. A putative suicide is found as the result of a fire, a man exonerated by Elvis in the past. Now it appears that the man was a serial killer and Elvis was responsible for providing him the freedom to kill others. Elvis goes to work, sorting things out. The result is a classic novel of detection, in which the protagonist knocks on doors, asks people questions, knocks on more doors, asks more questions and does not stop (no matter how many obstacles are placed in his path) until he has the answers he seeks.

While Elvis gets off a few good one-liners this is less the wisecracking Elvis Cole of the early novels and more the serious one of the more recent books. The plot is suitably complex, but the pace is perfect--a driving narrative that hurtles toward a plausible but unexpected conclusion. The ethos is pure Chandler, with apparent villainy in high places and a complete tour of L.A. from the dark booths of the Pacific Dining Car to the gritty, sad cottages of Sylmar and the sunny, but blood-soaked lawns of Santa Monica.

It is hard to say if this is Crais's best book, because he consistently sets and meets a high standard. Suffice to say it is an excellent one, one of the best of the summer. It is exceptionally well-written, with memorable observations and descriptions that are delivered economically and with great skill. The polish on the individual sentences gleams. Highly recommended.
21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
Phoning it in Aug. 11 2008
By Nora - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Where's the spark? Elvis Cole is nothing close to his chirpy, irreverant self, Pike is a pale shadow of his usual formidable presence and Starkey seems like a caricature of herself. Towards the end, the book becomes mildly interesting when Cole finally figures out whodunit, but then Crais cheats his audience with the ending. After a break from Cole in which Crais penned two other novels, I'd a-thunk he'd have brought Elvis back well rested and in fine form, but Elvis Cole seems as bored as I was in this latest addition to the series.
34 of 41 people found the following review helpful
Released too soon July 6 2008
By Savvy Spender - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Let me preface this by saying I am a huge Robert Crais fan; I have read all of his previous books, and with the exception of Demolition Angel, I thought they were all five star material. This is not five star material. It is more like a first draft; I felt like I was reading the outline not the book. There was no depth to the characters in this book, which R.C. usually provides in abundance. He tries to surprise us with the true identity of the villain, but I was only half surprised. In this case, I think he could have made the book more interesting by giving us a first person glimpse of the perpetrator(s), even if he wanted to keep the characters anonymous. Elvis' meager observations of the criminal(s) did little to peak my interest, and I think Elvis was frustrated with his lack of ingenuity as well. All in all, the book was as flat as week old ginger ale. I have seen this happen with several of my favorite authors, and perhaps it is because their publishers push too hard for that next book to be released and the next book tour to begin. I say let the book age properly and don't release it too soon.
14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
An absolute must-read for Elvis fans; a terrific book for any fan of the genre July 3 2008
By Brian Baker - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
A fire in the hills and canyons above Los Angeles leads to the discovery of the body of a man detective Elvis Cole had, years before, shown to be innocent of the murder accusations leveled against him.

But evidence found with the body seems to indicate that Cole may have made the biggest mistake of his career, and helped set a serial killer free to kill again.

This is a darker and more brooding novel than that which we typically associate with Crais's Elvis Cole character, and given the nature of the issues at stake, that's entirely appropriate and actually welcome. It adds another layer of humanity and complexity to the character, and makes it all too clear that though Elvis is usually the master of the arch wisecrack, he does take his work and life seriously when the bottom line is reached.

The complexities of the case are masterfully addressed; a blend of LA politics thrown into the mix with dogged detective work. The characterizations are richly realized with the deft strokes Crais has mastered so well: the telling movement, the revealing phrase, the details of place and setting. Few do it as well as Crais, and he brings all his skills and talents to bear in this book.

Of course, Joe Pike is there to cover Elvis's "six", as well as former LAPD bomb expert Starkey to lend a much-needed hand.

But the real joy was in seeing this other side of Elvis; as much fun as the character's always been, he's now so much more.

A very strong five stars. Read this book.


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