Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Pets Music Deals Store Fall Tools
Buy Used
CDN$ 5.88
+ CDN$ 6.49 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: A sound copy with only light wear. Overall a solid copy at a great price! All orders guaranteed and ship within 24 hours. Your purchase supports More Than Words, a nonprofit job training program for youth, empowering youth to take charge of their lives by taking charge of a business.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Chaucer's Sexual Poetics Paperback – Feb 15 1990

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
"Please retry"
CDN$ 158.03
"Please retry"
CDN$ 53.99 CDN$ 5.88

The Mountain Shadow by Gregory David Roberts The Mountain Shadow by Gregory David Roberts

No Kindle device required. Download one of the Free Kindle apps to start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, and computer.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your e-mail address or mobile phone number.

Product Details

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on (beta) 2 reviews
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
Chaucer Exhumed and Explained July 28 2007
By Christine Hamm - Published on
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dinshaw's book is mandatory reading for anyone interested in the new critiques of Medieval writers. Her ideas are clearly elucidated and thought out. She explores the most important of Chaucer's works from a feminist position that takes the whole of the middle ages into consideration. Her elucidation of "Adam, The Scribe" was especially helpful.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Important work for medieval scholarship July 5 2014
By Anne Babson - Published on
Format: Paperback
This text may be out of fashion right now, but its importance to late medieval scholarship will endure. She's a post-modernist and believes that "reading like a woman" is not an essentialist expression. Given the establishmentarian patriarchal environment in which she was reading medieval literature, how could she not see gender as a material issue in textual analysis and the issue of authorship in Chaucer's work?

She writes fluently and passionately. Read this, and even if you reject her approach, you will learn something.